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Still Waters

Evidence of 55 new chemicals found in people

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Still Waters

Scientists at UC San Francisco have detected 109 chemicals in a study of pregnant women, including 55 chemicals never before reported in people and 42 "mystery chemicals," whose sources and uses are unknown.

The chemicals most likely come from consumer products or other industrial sources. They were found both in the blood of pregnant women, as well as their newborn children, suggesting they are traveling through the mother's placenta.

"These chemicals have probably been in people for quite some time, but our technology is now helping us to identify more of them," said Tracey J. Woodruff, Ph.D., a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at UCSF.

https://phys.org/news/2021-03-evidence-chemicals-people.html

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OverSword

Holy smokes.  And we wonder about crashing testosterone levels, skyrocketing autism rates, unprecedented digestive issues, etc....  

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Eldorado
3 hours ago, OverSword said:

Holy smokes.  And we wonder about crashing testosterone levels, skyrocketing autism rates, unprecedented digestive issues, etc....  

First, autism is increasing because we are diagnosing milder forms. This is reflected in the term autism spectrum disorders because it includes such a broad spectrum of children that we, in the medical profession, never would have included before.

At first, only children with ‘classic autism’—no words, in their own world, and focused solely on repetitive behaviors—would have been diagnosed. Then we included children with some language but with serious problems socializing whose special interests—cars, trains, wheels, Toy Story, LEGOs, YouTube—took them out of social interaction.

Now we have expanded the spectrum to include those who have normal language but who have trouble functioning in school, can’t make or keep friendships, and have dominating intellectual interests like knowing all the sports stats for the Tigers or the train schedules for the B&O.

No question, expanded diagnostics is a major puzzle piece that explains autism’s increase.

https://playproject.org/why-is-autism-increasing-so-much/

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Seti42

I dislike 'articles' like this because they don't actually say anything, and they fuel the paranoid delusions/conspiracy theories of the entire anti-science and anti-medicine crowd.

OMG! CHEMICALS!

Yeah, and dihydrogen monoxide is highly corrosive and fatal if inhaled.

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mesuma
2 hours ago, Seti42 said:

Yeah, and dihydrogen monoxide is highly corrosive and fatal if inhaled.

Sounds dangerous.  Cheers for the warning.

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Hyperionxvii
8 hours ago, Still Waters said:

These chemicals have probably been in people for quite some time, but our technology is now helping us to identify more of them," said Tracey J. Woodruff, Ph.D., a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at UCSF.

Sounds reasonable to me. 

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qxcontinuum

I think our entire body has all the chemicals found on earth and universe hence where the our bodies are just star dust is coming from.
Also our bodies do emit radiation non stop, so exposure to x rays a couple of time in life would be just a spec comparing to the levels we live every day.

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