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Eldorado

There are mermaids in the Pacific Northwest

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Eldorado

The Pacific Northwest might seem like an unlikely place for mermaids and mermaid culture to catch on given the cold water here.

Yet, putting on an eye-catching tail and pretending to be a mythical sea being is a thing across the Northwest.

There's even a brand new mermaid museum near Aberdeen, Washington.

The museum's grand opening this past week accounted for multiple mermaid sightings in Grays Harbor County on the central Washington coast.

One was spotted playing a harp. People observed another with a gray and white tail reclining on a mermaid throne.

Yet another, get this, appeared at a book signing.

Full story & pics at NPR: KUOW

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newbloodmoon

As someone who had lived in the pacific NW of the US, I can categorically confirm mermaid sightings. Well sort of, the “tails” are unshaved leg hairs that have matted in to a tail like appendage. And there are cities such as Eugene and Portland that allow women to walk topless if they so choose. That should clear up any confusion,

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Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, newbloodmoon said:

As someone who had lived in the pacific NW of the US, I can categorically confirm mermaid sightings. Well sort of, the “tails” are unshaved leg hairs that have matted in to a tail like appendage. And there are cities such as Eugene and Portland that allow women to walk topless if they so choose. That should clear up any confusion,

I lived in Lakewood, Wa for many years when I Stationed at Ft. Lewis. I did a lot of diving in Puget Sound, and I was around 70 feet down under the Narrows Bridge, and I saw something maybe 10 feet below me. To this day I can't explain what it was, but it looked like a human form moving faster than any diver could move, plus the only time you can dive that site is at Slack Tide. While I realize that I must have mistaken what I think saw, because Mermaids don't exist, I still to this day can't explain it and .I can still clearly picture it in my mind and it happened almost 20 years ago.:unsure:

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Earl.Of.Trumps

Well, we can dream  :su

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DieChecker
22 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

I lived in Lakewood, Wa for many years when I Stationed at Ft. Lewis. I did a lot of diving in Puget Sound, and I was around 70 feet down under the Narrows Bridge, and I saw something maybe 10 feet below me. To this day I can't explain what it was, but it looked like a human form moving faster than any diver could move, plus the only time you can dive that site is at Slack Tide. While I realize that I must have mistaken what I think saw, because Mermaids don't exist, I still to this day can't explain it and .I can still clearly picture it in my mind and it happened almost 20 years ago.:unsure:

Maybe a big harbor seal? Those guys are usually pretty chubby, but in lean times they can thin down.

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DieChecker
On 4/7/2021 at 4:29 AM, Eldorado said:

The Pacific Northwest might seem like an unlikely place for mermaids and mermaid culture to catch on given the cold water here.

Yet, putting on an eye-catching tail and pretending to be a mythical sea being is a thing across the Northwest.

There's even a brand new mermaid museum near Aberdeen, Washington.

The museum's grand opening this past week accounted for multiple mermaid sightings in Grays Harbor County on the central Washington coast.

One was spotted playing a harp. People observed another with a gray and white tail reclining on a mermaid throne.

Yet another, get this, appeared at a book signing.

Full story & pics at NPR: KUOW

The only mermaids I've seen were on Starbucks signs and cups. They'd have to be chubby as a sea cow to swim in these coastal waters.

1200px-Starbucks_Corporation_Logo_2011_svg.thumb.png.91e281050da37f99248365ab3df162fb.png

Edited by DieChecker
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Manwon Lender
25 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

Maybe a big harbor seal? Those guys are usually pretty chubby, but in lean times they can thin down.

That would make sense except they don't have them in Puget Sound. 

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DieChecker
32 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

That would make sense except they don't have them in Puget Sound. 

Really, I had no idea. :nw:

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DieChecker
34 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:
Quote

Maybe a big harbor seal?

That would make sense except they don't have them in Puget Sound. 

A quick Google search seems to indicate otherwise.

https://www.seattleaquarium.org/animals/harbor-seals

Quote

Harbor seals are a familiar sight in the Puget Sound region. Their heads pop out of the water while we walk along the shore, cross the Sound by ferry, sit in a waterfront restaurant, or gaze out over Elliott Bay when visiting the Aquarium's harbor seal exhibit! 

 

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Manwon Lender
14 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

A quick Google search seems to indicate otherwise.

https://www.seattleaquarium.org/animals/harbor-seals

 

You posted a link to an aquarium, so yes they there are seals there, oh and I forgot there are also Easter Seals. You don't have any idea how big Puget Sound is, I have never seen a seal in the South Sound, and lived by it for more than 15 years. The seal populations are not located where I use to dive, I should have been more clear. Look at a map I was diving under the Narrows Bridge when I saw whatever I saw, I have never seen a seal in that area.

Edited by Manwon Lender

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DieChecker

This guy says they have harbor seals at Budd Inlet at Olympia. Which is way past the Narrows Bridge.

https://www.thurstontalk.com/2017/09/11/kayaking-budd-inlet-with-salmon-and-seals/

 

This site says the same...

https://outdoor-society.com/the-best-salmon-watching-in-olympia-washington/

MP7A3080.jpg

Thats clearly a harbor seal.

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DieChecker

https://www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/exhibits/marine-panel/harbor-seal/

Quote

Harbor Seals are the most commonly seen marine mammal in Puget Sound. They float at the surface with only the upper part of their head visible,

https://www.eopugetsound.org/magazine/is/managing-seals

14630242564_18fb06e9f9_b.jpg

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Manwon Lender
2 minutes ago, DieChecker said:

This guy says they have harbor seals at Budd Inlet at Olympia. Which is way past the Narrows Bridge.

https://www.thurstontalk.com/2017/09/11/kayaking-budd-inlet-with-salmon-and-seals/

 

This site says the same...

https://outdoor-society.com/the-best-salmon-watching-in-olympia-washington/

MP7A3080.jpg

Thats clearly a harbor seal.

Well if they are in Olympia I am obviously wrong, I had two homes in Lakewood, Wa between 1989 and 2014, and I still own one  even though we are living in Korea. This is embarrassing but I suffered a TBI in Iraq in 1991, and sometimes I have memory issues.  But dam, I don't know how I could forget something like this. 

Take Care

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