Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Eldorado

Particle is disobeying the known laws of physics

Recommended Posts

Eldorado

Particle mystery deepens, as physicists confirm that the muon is more magnetic than predicted

Science Mag

BBC

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Earl.Of.Trumps

This is the good stuff. The itsy-bitsy muon.

Between black matter, gray matter, and now this,. I'd have to say there is an awful lot about this universe we don't know.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stiff

Papa was right all along! 

  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cookie Monster
On 4/7/2021 at 8:49 PM, Eldorado said:

Particle mystery deepens, as physicists confirm that the muon is more magnetic than predicted

Science Mag

BBC

Your article is outdated.

Its up to 1 in 2.4 million chance its a fluke and once it hits 3 million its official - there is at least one unknown atomic particle.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
XenoFish
1 hour ago, Stiff said:

Papa was right all along! 

If this is a reference to who I think it is, this statement should 99.9999999% never exist.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jon the frog

We always have a lot to learn...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bison

Interesting. We've known for some time that quantum mechanics and relativity theory are both inadequate, because, while appearing largely correct, neither can account for some of the implications of the other.

Since, unlike the other three basic forces of nature, there is no quantum solution for gravitation, I wonder if this suspected 'new force' could, instead, be the quantum basis of gravitational fields. It's seeming magnetic interaction with muons may signal a unification of gravity and electromagnetism. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cookie Monster
1 minute ago, bison said:

Interesting. We've known for some time that quantum mechanics and relativity theory are both inadequate, because, while appearing largely correct, neither can account for some of the implications of the other.

Since, unlike the other three basic forces of nature, there is no quantum solution for gravitation, I wonder if this suspected 'new force' could, instead, be the quantum basis of gravitational fields. It's seeming magnetic interaction with muons may signal a unification of gravity and electromagnetism. 

The problem between both of them is that the maths they each use is incompatible with the other.

The Muon Electron G-2 evidence is that they know how all other atomic particles affect its spin. Yet, combined, its spin is affected slightly more that it should be indicating either a problem with the experiment or an unknown atomic particle. They are almost at the 1 in 3,500,000 probability of it not being an error. Thats the threshold for the declaration of a new particle.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Earl.Of.Trumps
22 hours ago, bison said:

Interesting. We've known for some time that quantum mechanics and relativity theory are both inadequate, because, while appearing largely correct, neither can account for some of the implications of the other.

Since, unlike the other three basic forces of nature, there is no quantum solution for gravitation, I wonder if this suspected 'new force' could, instead, be the quantum basis of gravitational fields. It's seeming magnetic interaction with muons may signal a unification of gravity and electromagnetism. 

 

"Beddy beddy interestink", bison. :cat:  A quantum solution to gravity - and maybe a lot more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bison

Given the relative weakness of gravitation, compared to the other forces, it seems reasonable that gravitons, if they exist, would have a very small effect on the measurement of the magnetic moment of muons. This is, of course, just the sort of effect they have found, repeatedly. If gravity can affect a particle with a magnetic charge, it would. it seems  open up the possibility of a means of unifying gravity with electromagnetism. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.