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Eldorado

Masculine men make better fathers

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Eldorado

In some men, having traditional masculine characteristics such as competitiveness and adventurousness was linked to being better fathers to infants, a new study found.

But the men in this study -- highly educated and from dual-earner couples -- combined those stereotypically masculine traits with the belief that they should be nurturing, highly involved fathers.

The researchers were surprised that traits often seen as old-fashioned male stereotypes were linked to more positive parenting behaviors, said study lead author Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan, professor of psychology at The Ohio State University.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210409104501.htm

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spartan max2

Oh they were suprised were they :rolleyes:

Quote

But the researchers were surprised to find that the more men said they fit the stereotypical definition of "real men," the more they were also rated as showing good parenting behavior.

 

"The fathers who see themselves as competitive and adventurous and the other masculine traits tended to be really engaged with their kids. They were not checked out," Schoppe-Sullivan said.

Morons.

 

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HandsomeGorilla

I think much of it stems from their fathers also wanting to see their kids compete. Not a bad thing at all, competitiveness is indeed a sign of higher testosterone. It boosts both the ego and confidence of the kid and father and 'prepares' them for later in life when competition can be cutthroat 

I'm speaking of this through the eyes of a son

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Tatetopa
5 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

Morons.

?

Seems reasonable, according to the write up, the men selected were in a somewhat special group of involved parents. Probably depends a lot on motivation.  Plenty of my friends growing up  had manly working dads who wanted to play with their own friends and who wanted nothing to do with their kids.  Kids, even  boys do notice and sometimes mention that stuff.  I got kinda lucky that my dad spent time with us and taught us.   He even taught one of my friends how to tie a tie for a date when that was a thing. 

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Michelle

My dad left when I was about ten. Before that I don't remember him being home much at all. I was always a tomboy though and competing with the guys in the neighborhood or my cousins who were all older by a few years. My mother would have had a heart attack if she has seen some of the things her youngest little daredevil did. :lol:

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Desertrat56

The title of this thread made me laugh out loud.

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OverSword

Men make the best fathers.  Who'da thunk?

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spartan max2
Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

?

Seems reasonable, according to the write up, the men selected were in a somewhat special group of involved parents. Probably depends a lot on motivation.  Plenty of my friends growing up  had manly working dads who wanted to play with their own friends and who wanted nothing to do with their kids.  Kids, even  boys do notice and sometimes mention that stuff.  I got kinda lucky that my dad spent time with us and taught us.   He even taught one of my friends how to tie a tie for a date when that was a thing. 

Sorry. It's probably just me. But I can't for the life of me figure out what you're trying to say or why you're saying it in connection to what I said?

Edited by spartan max2
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Xeno-Fish

My dad had me help him whenever he was doing stuff when I was a kid. Fixing the car, I was there. Building something, I was there. Going fishing, I was there (mostly). The only time I ever saw my father cry was when my brother was stillborn. He did the best he could to be a good dad. Now I do what I can for him. He taught me self-reliance, and determination. To honor my word and fulfill my promises. I did my best to do the same to my kids. If I was fixing or building something I asked them to help. But I also had my hair braded (when it was long) and had my nails painted by them, all because they wanted to. Plus several fridays of watching toonami with them. For what it's worth I tried to be a good father. 

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Xeno-Fish
29 minutes ago, HandsomeGorilla said:

I think much of it stems from their fathers also wanting to see their kids compete. Not a bad thing at all, competitiveness is indeed a sign of higher testosterone. It boosts both the ego and confidence of the kid and father and 'prepares' them for later in life when competition can be cutthroat 

I'm speaking of this through the eyes of a son

It wasn't competitiveness for me it was competency and capability. 

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Michelle
3 minutes ago, Xeno-Fish said:

It wasn't competitiveness for me it was competency and capability. 

My stepdad bought and sold cars fairly often. He was always tinkering with them and I usually had my head under the hood asking him what he was doing and why. By the time I bought my '78 Z28 I could fix almost anything that was wrong with it.

It's a very satisfying feeling.

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HandsomeGorilla
9 minutes ago, Xeno-Fish said:

It wasn't competitiveness for me it was competency and capability. 

I never played sports, I was an academic 

Just saying how it appears to be in many father and son and even father and daughter relationships 

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Xeno-Fish
1 minute ago, HandsomeGorilla said:

I never played sports, I was an academic 

Just saying how it appears to be in many father and son and even father and daughter relationships 

We're all different. I was just saying that mine was different. I didn't have the crazy sports dad. 

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Eldorado
Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Men make the best fathers.  Who'da thunk?

"...competitive, daring, adventurous, dominant, aggressive, courageous and stands up to pressure" men make for better fathers than self-absorbed, big girl's blouse men or violent selfish peckerhead men.

Edited by Eldorado
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OverSword
Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

Ego post is egocentric. Let's teach them to win at all costs. That's worked awfully well in the states, don't you think?

g

Believe it or not there are real men in Canada too.  The call them Hockey players.  they strive to win and dominate at all costs.  Criticize them.  Go ahead.

Edited by OverSword
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spartan max2
4 minutes ago, Eldorado said:

big girl's blouse men

What does this mean :blink: Lol

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Eldorado
Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

What does this mean :blink: Lol

Soft; chicken-livered and a tad effeminate.

Edited by Eldorado
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Hankenhunter
Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Believe it or not there are real men in Canada too.  The call them Hockey players.  they strive to win and dominate at all costs.

Yes, until their bodies are too broken to continue, and they die a painful death from accumulated injuries. Three shoulder dislocations playing, and no more hockey for me. What fun! Then there's watching the kids parents in the stands. Total lack of sportsmanship.

Edited by Hankenhunter
I'm punctuationally challenged today.

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OverSword
Posted (edited)

snip: It was too funny to leave up :w00t:

Edited by OverSword
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Xeno-Fish
2 minutes ago, OverSword said:

I'm going to buy some estrogen on my way home

So a steady diet of impossible whoppers it is.:lol:

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Tatetopa
1 hour ago, spartan max2 said:

Sorry. It's probably just me. But I can't for the life of me figure out what you're trying to say or why you're saying it in connection to what I said?

You are too kind.  It is certainly me be being obtuse.   I was not sure what your comment "morons" was aimed at. 

I thought the write up was aimed at being controversial and eye-catching. I think the study was confounded by having  two factors.   One factor was to select men who had working wives and wanted to be deeply  involved in their kids lives.  The other factor was to rate their masculinity so to speak.  Like many designed experiments with multiple factors, it is often the interactions between factors  that prove most significant. 

Masculine men who wanted to be involved with children were the most successful group in this survey.   The other groups those variables suggest are masculine men who don't want to be involved with their kids, men with a low level of masculinity who do, and finally men with a low level of masculinity who also do not want to be involved with kids..  No ratings reported for any of these.  Certainly no guarantee that masculine men who don't give a rip about their kids came in #2.

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spartan max2
Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

You are too kind.  It is certainly me be being obtuse.   I was not sure what your comment "morons" was aimed at. 

I thought the write up was aimed at being controversial and eye-catching. I think the study was confounded by having  two factors.   One factor was to select men who had working wives and wanted to be deeply  involved in their kids lives.  The other factor was to rate their masculinity so to speak.  Like many designed experiments with multiple factors, it is often the interactions between factors  that prove most significant. 

Masculine men who wanted to be involved with children were the most successful group in this survey.   The other groups those variables suggest are masculine men who don't want to be involved with their kids, men with a low level of masculinity who do, and finally men with a low level of masculinity who also do not want to be involved with kids..  No ratings reported for any of these.  Certainly no guarantee that masculine men who don't give a rip about their kids came in #2.

Ah yes, masculine and less masculine men who were not around and involved were not included in the study.

It would be interesting to see a study on if traditional masculine men were more or less likely to be involved in the first place than less masculine. 

I was calling the researchers morons because I found that they were "suprised" a little insulting. The idea that it's suprising traditionally masculine men make good father's kind of is saying that they don't think most men make good fathers and that masculinity is inherently a bad thing.

From my time working with at risk youth that type of stuff angers me because I find the messaging to be harmful to young kids. 

 

Edited by spartan max2
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the13bats

This is why i never had kids.

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Tatetopa
1 hour ago, spartan max2 said:

It would be interesting to see a study on if traditional masculine men were more or less likely to be involved in the first place than less masculine. 

That would have indeed been good.  I know it is my personal bias, but engineers sometimes belittle social workers studies and statistics as being  too undisciplined.  Admittedly it is so much easier with physical processes than behavior. 

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Cookie Monster
4 hours ago, Eldorado said:

In some men, having traditional masculine characteristics such as competitiveness and adventurousness was linked to being better fathers to infants, a new study found.

But the men in this study -- highly educated and from dual-earner couples -- combined those stereotypically masculine traits with the belief that they should be nurturing, highly involved fathers.

The researchers were surprised that traits often seen as old-fashioned male stereotypes were linked to more positive parenting behaviors, said study lead author Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan, professor of psychology at The Ohio State University.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/04/210409104501.htm

Is it really a surprise though?

Its the degradation of societies values by the left that has in part attacked masculinity. The drive for a feminised society with no identity, culture, or differences of any kind. The aim for a touchy feeling community where everyone is led by their emotions. The wise man can see through it and knows to ignore it.

Children need both parents as role models. Each brings something different to their development. The father teaches self-discipline, self-confidence, grit and determination, and inner strength. Something that has worked for 1000s of years, exists across all species, and results in well-balances offspring.

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