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My Grandfather's NDE

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By: C L Palmer | Location: Oakland, California

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After a major heart attack, my grandfather was taken to the Oak Knoll Navy Hospital in Oakland, California back in the late 1980s. There, his heart stopped and he was dead for a number of minutes. He later described what he experienced during that time to my mother and grandmother, who later related it to me.

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/stories/112423/my-grandfathers-nde

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preacherman76

Yeah NDE’s to me are nothing short of amazing. They have built my faith in a possible afterlife like nothing else. 
 

For people who work with the elderly they see this type of thing all the time. What both your grandparents experienced is actually very common. Thank you for sharing. 

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papageorge1

This reads like a quite typical NDE story. What I believe happens is that at times of life threatening physical trauma the astral body separates from the physical body and consciousness is then experienced through the astral body. Should the physical body not recover the astral body moves on to higher plane experiences and encounters other entities of the astral plane.

Years later, the grandfather on the astral plane visited the grandmother (as a kind of guide) as her physical body was losing its vitality and she sensed him through her astral senses.

The verifiable knowledge of the recovery effort the grandfather had during his out of body experienced is also often reported in Near Death Experiences and seems to argue against any 'imagination only' theory. 

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the13bats

This is another reason my 40 plus years study into paranormal has taken me down the path of how the brain functions.

Its very intriguing how intense shock trauma effects the mind, Sherapy on here works with the dying and didnt ever give me an impression she has seen anything to suggest NDE or life after death,

Either way, no life after death or life after death are terrifying.

 

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Hankenhunter
On 4/24/2021 at 8:18 AM, papageorge1 said:

This reads like a quite typical NDE story. What I believe happens is that at times of life threatening physical trauma the astral body separates from the physical body and consciousness is then experienced through the astral body. Should the physical body not recover the astral body moves on to higher plane experiences and encounters other entities of the astral plane.

Years later, the grandfather on the astral plane visited the grandmother (as a kind of guide) as her physical body was losing its vitality and she sensed him through her astral senses.

The verifiable knowledge of the recovery effort the grandfather had during his out of body experienced is also often reported in Near Death Experiences and seems to argue against any 'imagination only' theory. 

The near death experience, is just a foretaste of the afterlife according to past, and between lives hypnotherapy patients. The flip side doesn't really start until the life cord to your body is severed. Once cut, there's no going back. Also, once cut, all past life memories are back with you. The veil is gone, as well as your ego, which would have driven you insane with that much contradictory information. A being of light, not meat. Our true state.

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preacherman76

Did you have an experience last week?

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papageorge1
11 hours ago, the13bats said:

 

Either way, no life after death or life after death are terrifying.

 

What is terrifying about life after death? From reports it is a beautiful experience for almost everyone. And I trust it will be for me.

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Hankenhunter
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, preacherman76 said:

Did you have an experience last week?

Nope. Perhaps because of my absolute faith, I didn't need to see the flip side. I've seen it through others people's eyes often enough that the powers that be may have decided it was unnecessary. I use to wish I could have one, but then realized the amount trauma one has to go through to have one wasn't worth it. I can happily wait without all that trauma. Besides I'm already on the right path, no short trip needed. Glad you asked. Cheers,

Hank

Edited by Hankenhunter
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Xeno-Fish

Dead is dead. Near death ain't dead. 

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the13bats
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

What is terrifying about life after death? From reports it is a beautiful experience for almost everyone. And I trust it will be for me.

Fact is there is no proof of it so far and for those who count on it if they are will be let down  but not even know it.

Edited by the13bats

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papageorge1
1 hour ago, the13bats said:

Fact is there is no proof of it so far and for those who count on it if they are will be let down  but not even know it.

I guess I'm not clear that answers my question. What are you terrified about either way?

Your statement was: Either way, no life after death or life after death are terrifying.

I guess don't bother as it's not going anywhere constructive. I believe in life after death at 99+% on the Papameter from the quantity, quality and consistency of the evidence.

 

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the13bats
1 hour ago, papageorge1 said:

I guess I'm not clear that answers my question. What are you terrified about either way?

Your statement was: Either way, no life after death or life after death are terrifying.

I guess don't bother as it's not going anywhere constructive. I believe in life after death at 99+% on the Papameter from the quantity, quality and consistency of the evidence.

 

Dont post a statement at me them say "dont bother" makes you look like a baiting troll.

I posted my remark in a rhetorical way as any one who doesnt get it isnt going to, not a me problem or issue.

Im happy you believe in AF but as far as claims of NDE or afterlife goes all we have are stories which means no quantity, quality and stories are not evidence if anyone provides actual evidence not anecdotal ill take a look at it.

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Xeno-Fish

Look, my first nde was explained. The experience was based on my semi-lucidity with some fill in the blank. As for my second there was nothing. I got no warning because I didn't start that argument. 

I have no reason to think that nde's are nothing more than a head trip. Until something factual comes along that proves some afterlife, I'm sticking with dead is dead. Near death isn't dead. 

I don't care how many anecdotal stories there are. 

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Sherapy
17 hours ago, the13bats said:

This is another reason my 40 plus years study into paranormal has taken me down the path of how the brain functions.

Its very intriguing how intense shock trauma effects the mind, Sherapy on here works with the dying and didnt ever give me an impression she has seen anything to suggest NDE or life after death,

Either way, no life after death or life after death are terrifying.

 

I work for Hospice and I have not observed anything or any reason to think NDE’s are anything more than hallucinations. I think what touches my heart is the actual death journey it is one of great freedom and to share in this as the topper for a life well lived has been a great honor for me. 

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Sherapy
39 minutes ago, Xeno-Fish said:

Look, my first nde was explained. The experience was based on my semi-lucidity with some fill in the blank. As for my second there was nothing. I got no warning because I didn't start that argument. 

I have no reason to think that nde's are nothing more than a head trip. Until something factual comes along that proves some afterlife, I'm sticking with dead is dead. Near death isn't dead. 

I don't care how many anecdotal stories there are. 

Exactly, near death is not death the biological process of death once started cannot be reversed. The body in its own wisdom shuts down, starting with the kidneys and goes from there. 

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Hankenhunter
33 minutes ago, Xeno-Fish said:

Look, my first nde was explained. The experience was based on my semi-lucidity with some fill in the blank. As for my second there was nothing. I got no warning because I didn't start that argument. 

I have no reason to think that nde's are nothing more than a head trip. Until something factual comes along that proves some afterlife, I'm sticking with dead is dead. Near death isn't dead. 

I don't care how many anecdotal stories there are. 

Thank you for your clarification. I am quite confident that you will be pleasantly surprised to find out upon passing,  that you were wrong. Unless of course, you actually want the void. Careful what you wish for, you might get it. My interpretation is that you will still be a spirit, and still be aware in the void. Alone in the void for eternity.You do have free will, after all. Even in death. May you be blessed with enlightenment, before you curse yourself with oblivion.

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Hankenhunter
Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

I work for Hospice and I have not observed anything or any reason to think NDE’s are anything more than hallucinations. I think what touches my heart is the actual death journey it is one of great freedom and to share in this as the topper for a life well lived has been a great honor for me. 

Thank you. You honor us with your presence. Information is never bad. It's what you do with it that matters. I would like to ask though for clarities sake, would you ever tell  one of your patients that the afterlife doesn't exist? Would you except their beliefs even though they aren't yours?

Edited to add,

If I may, and you certainty don't have to answer, ask you if you fear death after all your experiences? Thank you.

Hank

Edited by Hankenhunter
I'm punctuationally challenged today.
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Xeno-Fish
9 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

Thank you for your clarification. I am quite confident that you will be pleasantly surprised to find out upon passing,  that you were wrong. Unless of course, you actually want the void. Careful what you wish for, you might get it. My interpretation is that you will still be a spirit, and still be aware in the void. Alone in the void for eternity.You do have free will, after all. Even in death. May you be blessed with enlightenment, before you curse yourself with oblivion.

I don't care what happens after everything in my body shuts down. 

There is still a life to live regardless of how long or short it'll be. 

If there's something I'll know, if nothing I won't. 

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Hankenhunter
1 minute ago, Xeno-Fish said:

I don't care what happens after everything in my body shuts down. 

There is still a life to live regardless of how long or short it'll be. 

If there's something I'll know, if nothing I won't. 

Thank you. 

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Sherapy
33 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

Thank you. You honor us with your presence. Information is never bad. It's what you do with it that matters. I would like to ask though for clarities sake, would you ever tell  one of your patients that the afterlife doesn't exist? Would you except their beliefs even though they aren't yours?

Edited to add,

If I may, and you certainty don't have to answer, ask you if you fear death after all your experiences? Thank you.

Hank

Never, I honor and respect the beliefs they have and am humbled to have the opportunity to learn from them, I am only there by luck. I am on a Hospice case now, the wife ( primary caregiver for 12 years, husband is late stage Alzheimer’s ) she is Pentecostal and it is a delight to see how she uses her faith to get her thru. I have no judgement just come with an open heart and curiosity. I will say her faith is at a level that I have not seen, she is not dogmatic though and her beliefs are undergirded by her Navajo upbringing. It is simply interesting to me. 

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Hankenhunter
30 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

Never, I honor and respect the beliefs they have and am humbled to have the opportunity to learn from them, I am only there by luck. I am on a Hospice case now, the wife ( primary caregiver for 12 years, husband is late stage Alzheimer’s ) she is Pentecostal and it is a delight to see how she uses her faith to get her thru. I have no judgement just come with an open heart and curiosity. I will say her faith is at a level that I have not seen, she is not dogmatic though and her beliefs are undergirded by her Navajo upbringing. It is simply interesting to me. 

Awesome answers. Thank you.

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Sherapy
Posted (edited)

@Hankenhunter

I have not feared the inevitability of my own death since my youth, I am actually more like a Viking in spirit, I am curious as to how I will go out and it seems the more someone lived the more they look forward to the end. My grandpa always said eventually you get enough life if you have actually lived yours. My two cents is live to the fullest, try things, experience it all, do the crazy things like up and move to your dream spot when everyone says your crazy to do so with your only 3 hundred dollars to your name and no jobs. Meet your beloved in the place everyone says not to, tee hee. I met the love of my life at a bar in my day there were supposedly no good men in a bar. Surprise, surprise. :P

Edited by Sherapy
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Hankenhunter
2 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

@Hankenhunter

I have not feared the inevitability of my own death since my youth, I am actually more like a Viking in spirit, I am curious as to how I will go out and it seems the more someone lived the more they look forward to the end. My grandpa always said eventually you get enough life if you have actually lived it. My two cents is live to the fullest, try things, experience it all. 

We have very similar philosophies on life itself. Thank you for your very honest answer. 

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Sherapy
1 minute ago, Hankenhunter said:

We have very similar philosophies on life itself. Thank you for your very honest answer. 

I love my ordinary life to the fullest. 

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Hankenhunter
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

I love my ordinary life to the fullest. 

As do I. I've crammed a lot of living in my 62 years. Good, and bad. Wouldn't change a thing either. It's all learning. The sum total makes us who we are, and where we're going. I am getting a bit tired though. Gotta hang on to meet, and teach my first grandchild  in July. A future labour of love. Then I can pass fulfilled. Long life to you so that you can continue your journey of helping others.

Hank

Edited by Hankenhunter
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