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Abramelin

Corvus corone, the common crow

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Abramelin
Posted (edited)

Many here will know that I am interested in corvids, or crows, rooks, ravens, jackdaws, magpies, and so on.

I was googling for some nice photos of the common crow, or in latin: corvus corone.

But I made a typo and googled "corvus corona" instead, and after some clicks, I arrived at the next site:

https://www.constellationsofwords.com/corvus/

I downloaded the image of the constellation, and started reading.

I of course knew of the Greek myth. Quote from the link:

"Another myth tells us that Corvus, the raven, was given a task by Apollo of keeping a watchful eye on Apollo’s pregnant lover Coronis (her name might relate to crow or crown, one of the Hyades in Taurus is named Coronis). The raven reported back to Apollo the unwelcome news that she was having an affair with someone else. Apollo in anger cursed the raven, and its color changed from its former silver hue to the present black. Corona was killed by Apollo’s sister Artemis. The unborn child of Coronis and Apollo was rescued and raised as Asclepius who is identified with Ophiuchus".

Then I noticed the typo in the text:

"CoronA was killed by Apollo's sister Artemis" ...

Corona killed by Artemis??

Now I also happen to be interested in herbal medicine (no, that's most certainly nòt the same as homeopathy), and I thought, "hey, could artemisia (= wormwood, mugwort) help fight Covid19??"

Ok, I googled again and found this:

https://www.wpi.edu/news/early-research-finds-extracts-sweet-wormwood-plant-can-inhibit-covid-19-virus

Quote:

Wormwood Plant Can Inhibit the COVID-19 Virus

May 4, 2021

A team of researchers that includes Worcester Polytechnic Institute Biology Professor Pamela Weathers has found that extracts from the leaves of the Artemisia annua plant, a medicinal herb also known as sweet wormwood, inhibit the replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and two of its recent variants.

The team, which included researchers from Columbia University in New York and the University of Washington at Seattle, also found that extracts of the plant were more effective against the virus when levels of a key therapeutic compound in the plant, artemisinin, were low. The in vitro findings led the researchers to suggest that one or more compounds in Artemisia annua, or A. annua, that have not yet been identified may point to a safe, low-cost therapeutic treatment for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

The work was described in an article published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

Nice going: 2 typo's (mine and someone else's), and then finding some herb that MAY help fight covid19.

Edited by Abramelin
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Abramelin

I wasn't sure where to post my story about this coïncidence and me connecting dots.

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quiXilver

Outstanding stuff @Abramelin!

Touching on several of my favorite topics in one go...  i've been cultivating a relationship with our local corvus corvidae population for two decades now)

Thank you for sharing.

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Desertrat56

Thanks for this @Abramelin.   My mother used to grow a variety of artemisia because her grandmother's middle name was that Artemisia.  It didn't survive when I moved to Texas and I have thought about getting some more.

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quiXilver

As it relates to Ravens... I've been following and enjoying watching Fable the Raven on this youtube aviary channel.

She's a hoot.  Here's a link if anyone else is interested.

 

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ouija ouija

Bl**dy brilliant!! :w00t: I love your thought process. This is very exciting! Sounds as if, at the very least, it would relieve a lot of discomfort and limit the formation of scar tissue. I hope she gets enough funding to continue with her research. :tu:

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Abramelin
22 minutes ago, ouija ouija said:

Bl**dy brilliant!! :w00t: I love your thought process. This is very exciting! Sounds as if, at the very least, it would relieve a lot of discomfort and limit the formation of scar tissue. I hope she gets enough funding to continue with her research. :tu:

I was thinking of the poorer countries: this herb is easy to grow.

It won't cure the disease, but it will help to alleviate the symptoms.

 

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