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Waspie_Dwarf

See the First Images NASA’s Juno Took As It Sailed by Ganymede

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Waspie_Dwarf

See the First Images NASA’s Juno Took As It Sailed by Ganymede

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pia24681-1041.jpg?itok=etdJhoZS

The spacecraft flew closer to Jupiter’s largest moon than any other in more than two decades, offering dramatic glimpses of the icy orb.

The first two images from NASA Juno’s June 7, 2021, flyby of Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede have been received on Earth. The photos – one from the Jupiter orbiter’s JunoCam imager and the other from its Stellar Reference Unit star camera – show the surface in remarkable detail, including craters, clearly distinct dark and bright terrain, and long structural features possibly linked to tectonic faults.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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ChrLzs

Nice image with amazing detail, but NASA do need to work a little harder on their image processing - note the problems (posterisation and compression artifacts) in the 'black' areas, and jaggies (from poor stitching) along the edges...?  C'mon NASA, you're better than Google Earth, surely..? :) 

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Waspie_Dwarf
19 minutes ago, ChrLzs said:

Nice image with amazing detail, but NASA do need to work a little harder on their image processing - note the problems (posterisation and compression artifacts) in the 'black' areas, and jaggies (from poor stitching) along the edges...?  C'mon NASA, you're better than Google Earth, surely..? :) 

You do realise that this is a raw image prior to processing don't you?

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This image is a preliminary product – Ganymede as seen through JunoCam’s green filter. Juno is a spin-stabilized spacecraft (with a rotation rate of 2 rpm), and the JunoCam imager has a fixed field of view. To obtain Ganymede images as Juno rotated, the camera acquired a strip at a time as the target passed through its field of view. These image strips were captured separately through the red, green, and blue filters. To generate the final image product, the strips must be stitched together and colors aligned.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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ChrLzs
Just now, Waspie_Dwarf said:

You do realise that this is a raw image prior to processing don't you?

The problem is that they have already done some processing, to stitch the image strips together.  They have translated the raw files to a non-raw format and then run the image stripes through some software that 'bends' the imagery from flat 2d strips as needed to render a 3d shape, but it wasn't done accurately.  They should have the lens characteristics already dialled in and if they see jaggies like that, they can easily intervene.  I do a lot of panoramas, so perhaps I'm biased....  And fixing black level is a 30 second process.

My problem with this is that it can result in silly new conspiracy theories - someone will  see the bumps or the weird shapes in the black noise and claim they are alien structures...

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Manwon Lender

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA’s Juno spacecraft has provided the first close-ups of Jupiter’s largest moon in two decades. Juno zoomed past icy Ganymede on Monday, passing within 645 miles (1,038 kilometers). The last time a spacecraft came that close was in 2000 when NASA’s Galileo spacecraft swept past our solar system’s biggest moon.

Spacecraft buzzes Jupiter's mega moon, 1st close-up in years (msn.com)

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L.A.T.1961

This week the Juno mission to the Jupiter system made the first close flyby of Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede, and as you might guess, the images are spectacular. This is the first time we’ve seen a close-up view of the Solar System’s largest moon since the Galileo mission 20 years ago.

https://www.universetoday.com/151444/finally-new-pictures-of-ganymede-thanks-to-juno/

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Manwon Lender
4 hours ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

This week the Juno mission to the Jupiter system made the first close flyby of Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede, and as you might guess, the images are spectacular. This is the first time we’ve seen a close-up view of the Solar System’s largest moon since the Galileo mission 20 years ago.

https://www.universetoday.com/151444/finally-new-pictures-of-ganymede-thanks-to-juno/

Thank you for sharing that was really cool.

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