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Huge, blinking star spotted near galactic core

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DreadLordAvatar

Dyson sphere. We are not alone.

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Abramelin

Faulty measurements.

A glitch.

 

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Tom1200
5 hours ago, DreadLordAvatar said:

Dyson sphere. We are not alone.

They're 25,000 lightyears away.  We're effectively alone...

I love the last line: "It is thought that the disc could pass in front of the star again within the next 20 to 200 years."  An utterly worthless 'prediction' based on no available evidence that adds nothing to the story.  I'll add my own pointless contribution: "It is thought a different disc could pass in front of the star again within the next 20 to 200 years."  There - I'm now an astrophysicist!

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Earl.Of.Trumps

Tell us how you really feel, @Tom1200 :lol:

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pallidin

If nothing else exists in this entire, incredibly vast universe, than we, by quasi-extension, do not exist.

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Ell
Posted (edited)

The disk explanation appears contrived. I do not believe it.

 

That said, I cannot provide a more probable explanation for 97% of dimming during several hundreds of days.

 

It is an interesting phenomenon. :-)

Hm, the star may have puffed out a dense sphere of dust during a hundred days, blocking its light. As the sphere expanded during the next hundred days it became transparent to the star's light again.

Plausible?

Edited by Ell
Added a hypothetical explanation.

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Eldorado

Stars may twinkle, but they don’t just vanish—so when a distant, giant star pulled a disappearing act for about 200 days, it took astronomers by surprise.

Now, roughly a decade later, astronomers have sifted through a variety of possible explanations—and they still have no idea what’s responsible for blotting out nearly all of the star’s light.

Described in a new study in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, some of the theories still on the table rely on as-yet unobserved phenomena, such as a dark disk of material orbiting a nearby black hole, or undiscovered, dust-enshrouded companion stars.

But over 17 years of observations, the star has only gone dark once, in 2012, making it more difficult for teams to nail down a plausible culprit.

Nat Geo article

Abstract: Oxford Academic

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Essan

I think that it's very possible that the dimming of Betelgeuse may be due to the  Great Collapsing Hrung Disaster

Obviously if anyone knew what a Hrung was and why it should choose to collapse on Betelguese VII we would know for sure.

 

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