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'Water witches' pit science against folklore

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esoteric_toad

Seriously, the jury is not out. Dowsing is nonsense.

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Buzz_Light_Year
1 hour ago, esoteric_toad said:

Seriously, the jury is not out. Dowsing is nonsense.

No it isn't. I can do it and I can also find underground electric and sewer lines. I have known at least 3 besides myself that have the ability to do this. Don't ask me how I do it or how it works because I haven't a clue.

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papageorge1

I believe there i something real to dowsing like I believe a lot of other things that don't belong in a materialist paradigm. What the bleep do we know.

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Wreck7

It works.

  I use two bent steel rods held loosely. You can find whatever you're looking for. Have someone hide a quarter under a cup with two or three empty ones. Think "quarter" and the rods will cross over that cup. Use them to find water by thinking "water" then then ask yourself "how deep" walk away from the spot until the rods cross again and that's your depth.

 Try it. 

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Twin

I'm not to sure I fully grasp the meaning of:

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Twin
Posted (edited)

I'm not to sure I fully grasp the meaning of:
In a region of adequate rainfall and favorable geology, it is difficult not to drill and find water!"

Anyway, Ive seen it done and it worked

Edited by Twin
only first line showed up in my comment.

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NCC1701

If it worked, dowsers would be rich people.

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psyche101

Put to the test, it fails.

 

 

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gillmanjoe

my parents did it on their property in the ozarks and found a natural spring. during some parts of the year it runs as hard as a kitchen faucet.

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Hugh Mungus

I've seen it done to find water mains. No proof other than my eyes.

I had some old plans of the mains i was trying to find and when the city council contractors turned up, dug a few holes where my plans showed the main, then started dowsing and found the main we were looking for about 10 meters away on the other side of a driveway. Dug once, hit the main spot on.

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Trihalo42

The science is that impure water, a conductor, moving across the earth's magnetic field results in ionization (static). It's like passing a straight piece of wire over a magnet. That ionization is best detected in very dry conditions, which is usually why people are looking for water in the first place. The two metal rods technique is simply static in the air causing the rods to move together. Any kind of grounding, like morning dew, will disrupt the effect.

The same technique can be used to locate PVC water mains without tracer wire or having tracer tape that has broken down over the years, as long as the water is flowing. Same goes for electrical lines, but that should be obvious.

The reason it's a suppressed technology is that an electric potential can exist between a dry ground, like a car body, and the static field generated. Such a device usually consists of a metal rod or pipe sunk into water moving underground, a dry ground, and some sort of static buffer between, which can be layers of styrofoam and "steel wool" or simply a large ball of regular wool, and has no moving parts other than the water. The devices do tend to draw lightning. The reason for suppressing it is the psychotic need to control how we get electricity, which included the burning of Tesla's tower.

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