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'Water witches' pit science against folklore


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Seriously, the jury is not out. Dowsing is nonsense.

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I believe there i something real to dowsing like I believe a lot of other things that don't belong in a materialist paradigm. What the bleep do we know.

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It works.

  I use two bent steel rods held loosely. You can find whatever you're looking for. Have someone hide a quarter under a cup with two or three empty ones. Think "quarter" and the rods will cross over that cup. Use them to find water by thinking "water" then then ask yourself "how deep" walk away from the spot until the rods cross again and that's your depth.

 Try it. 

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I'm not to sure I fully grasp the meaning of:

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I'm not to sure I fully grasp the meaning of:
In a region of adequate rainfall and favorable geology, it is difficult not to drill and find water!"

Anyway, Ive seen it done and it worked

Edited by Twin
only first line showed up in my comment.
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Put to the test, it fails.

 

 

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my parents did it on their property in the ozarks and found a natural spring. during some parts of the year it runs as hard as a kitchen faucet.

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I've seen it done to find water mains. No proof other than my eyes.

I had some old plans of the mains i was trying to find and when the city council contractors turned up, dug a few holes where my plans showed the main, then started dowsing and found the main we were looking for about 10 meters away on the other side of a driveway. Dug once, hit the main spot on.

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The science is that impure water, a conductor, moving across the earth's magnetic field results in ionization (static). It's like passing a straight piece of wire over a magnet. That ionization is best detected in very dry conditions, which is usually why people are looking for water in the first place. The two metal rods technique is simply static in the air causing the rods to move together. Any kind of grounding, like morning dew, will disrupt the effect.

The same technique can be used to locate PVC water mains without tracer wire or having tracer tape that has broken down over the years, as long as the water is flowing. Same goes for electrical lines, but that should be obvious.

The reason it's a suppressed technology is that an electric potential can exist between a dry ground, like a car body, and the static field generated. Such a device usually consists of a metal rod or pipe sunk into water moving underground, a dry ground, and some sort of static buffer between, which can be layers of styrofoam and "steel wool" or simply a large ball of regular wool, and has no moving parts other than the water. The devices do tend to draw lightning. The reason for suppressing it is the psychotic need to control how we get electricity, which included the burning of Tesla's tower.

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  • 3 months later...

I was about to write something similar I've learnt in high school during a chemistry class. There is real science behind this practice. 

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It absolutely works.

I've had the experience of witnessing the process more than once.

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On 7/31/2021 at 1:37 PM, Trihalo42 said:

The science is that impure water, a conductor, moving across the earth's magnetic field results in ionization (static). It's like passing a straight piece of wire over a magnet. That ionization is best detected in very dry conditions, which is usually why people are looking for water in the first place. The two metal rods technique is simply static in the air causing the rods to move together. Any kind of grounding, like morning dew, will disrupt the effect.

The same technique can be used to locate PVC water mains without tracer wire or having tracer tape that has broken down over the years, as long as the water is flowing. Same goes for electrical lines, but that should be obvious.

The reason it's a suppressed technology is that an electric potential can exist between a dry ground, like a car body, and the static field generated. Such a device usually consists of a metal rod or pipe sunk into water moving underground, a dry ground, and some sort of static buffer between, which can be layers of styrofoam and "steel wool" or simply a large ball of regular wool, and has no moving parts other than the water. The devices do tend to draw lightning. The reason for suppressing it is the psychotic need to control how we get electricity, which included the burning of Tesla's tower.

For the gods know what reason, while reading your post, I had to think of Lord Kelvin's Thunderstorm.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have known several plumbers that would douse to locate pipes and such. Their accuracy was so good that it pretty well eliminated doubt that they could do it. I can't totally explain it but I am talking about people that did this on an almost daily basis. I worked with one of them one summer when I was a teenager. He was a nice guy but totally lacked a sense of humor. I can't see him doing it as a joke at all. He did it all the time and was almost never wrong. The one time that he was wrong he dug up an old pipe that was no longer in use and so not the one he was looking for. It is like a metal detector. I can't clearly explain in detail to you HOW they work but CAN assure you that they do.

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On 7/30/2021 at 8:21 AM, NCC1701 said:

If it worked, dowsers would be rich people.

In Australia many of them are.

Professional dowsers here charge  from a few hundred dollars a day to around 500 for individuals and more when finding water for big corporations like mining or pastoral companies   Of course, some of the old timers still do it for a carton of beer (  which  s still over $50) 

Ive seen a professional dowser find water on an outback station property 

Not only did he find it but he described the depth and the layers of water (eg saline and fresh ) which would have to be drilled to

There were no geological indicators of underground water and no current maps of any existence of them.

  That said, he searched and found the underground water where one might expect an underground aquifer to be.  ie under a slight valley, on an otherwise very flat plain 

The water made the property more viable for  sheep and  cattle, and increased profits markedly. Until then, water had been sourced from  a surface spring and dam about 10 miles away, which was good  enough for animals , but  not as reliable 

The dowser was very well paid.

I  remember this well, as I was later  helping my brother in law unload long  drill casings from  a truck,  for this location, when   a couple of them  slid off from the top of the load.

  One hit me on the head, and knocked me out very briefly,, but  we kept on unloading  . :) 

Edited by Mr Walker
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On 7/29/2021 at 1:06 PM, UM-Bot said:

Can dowsers really find water sources using nothing but a wooden stick or is dowsing a centuries-long con ?

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/349260/water-witches-pit-science-against-folklore

I recon its real so long as the water is near to the surface.

Water carries a EM charge so if you wanted over it with a magnet you would notice it affect the magnet. The effect would be smaller with a stick, but someone still might be able to feel it.

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34 minutes ago, Cookie Monster said:

I recon its real so long as the water is near to the surface.

Water carries a EM charge so if you wanted over it with a magnet you would notice it affect the magnet. The effect would be smaller with a stick, but someone still might be able to feel it.

Water doesn't carry a charge.

Nor does running water create any electromagnetic field.

Harte

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16 hours ago, Harte said:

Water doesn't carry a charge.

Nor does running water create any electromagnetic field.

Harte

The Hydrogen atoms have a positive charge, the oxygen a negative.

Its why a stream of water out the tap twists, why it rotates down the plug hole, why holding a magnet near a stream of water repels or attracts it.

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9 hours ago, Cookie Monster said:

The Hydrogen atoms have a positive charge, the oxygen a negative.

No they don't. An atom can only be positively charged if it's missing electrons, which H2O never does, and if it's negatively charged it's called ionization, which does not happen to pure water. Only minerals (impurities) in the water can be ionized. Pure water isn't even electrically conducting.

Quote

Its why a stream of water out the tap twists, why it rotates down the plug hole

Wrong again. That is caused by the Earth's magnetic core. North of the equator it turns one way, south it turns the other. So do storms.

Edited by zep73
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On 11/30/2021 at 12:16 PM, zep73 said:

No they don't. An atom can only be positively charged if it's missing electrons, which H2O never does, and if it's negatively charged it's called ionization, which does not happen to pure water. Only minerals (impurities) in the water can be ionized. Pure water isn't even electrically conducting.

Wrong again. That is caused by the Earth's magnetic core. North of the equator it turns one way, south it turns the other. So do storms.

I think it is the Coriolis effect of the earths rotation.  Cyclones and winds   have the same patterns.

In the southern hemisphere they bend to the left, and in the northern hemisphere they bend to the right  

There is some argument that the coriolis effect is too weak to affect water going down a drain, yet in the northern hemisphere it goes  one way  and in the southern  hemisphere it goes   the opposite way 

you can 'force" the water to spin the other way, but it will always return to the same rotation 

If its not coriolis, then its something similar, to do with the earth's spin 

Ps whatever the maths/physics on this i have observed it in hundreds  of sinks and baths in Australia   over a period of almost 70 years 

I dont know about the northern hemisphere, but I've NEVER seen water spin " the wrong way"  unless you spin it with your finger. Then  It will rotate that way for a short time before  reverting to the original spin direction.

Maybe it's the configuration of taps or drains but,  in Australia, 100 % of the times that  i have observed it, the water has spun the same way   in  showers, toilets, baths, and sinks, 

 

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