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'Majority' of Afghans who worked for the US and applied for visas were likely left behind, State Dep


Manwon Lender
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On 10/7/2021 at 8:02 PM, Green Lion said:

Update:

According to this 85 more citizens have made it out. From September 20

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2021/09/20/85-americans-have-left-afghanistan-since-us-withdrawal.html

Another 100 from 1 week ago.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2021/09/28/politics/americans-evacuated-afghanistan-tuesday/index.html

I guess these aren't all citizens, but other green card holders too. There can't be too many left......

Of those Afghans who WERE evacuated, HUNDREDS are just walking away from the military bases where they were to be held until properly vetted.  Nice, huh?  

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On 9/2/2021 at 9:57 AM, spartan max2 said:

This is why I don't really agree when people say "Afghans didn't want to fight for their own country."

 

they do want , and they do fight, but the enemy we want them to fight is not the enemy they want to fight, plus Afghanistan isn't really a one united country, it's bunch of tribes and territories controlled by warlords, Taliban, Pakistan. central gvmnt was only in the name.

Edited by aztek
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2 hours ago, aztek said:

they do want , and they do fight, but the enemy we want them to fight is not the enemy they want to fight, plus Afghanistan isn't really a one united country, it's bunch of tribes and territories controlled by warlords, Taliban, Pakistan. central gvmnt was only in the name.

This is a fact that too few are aware of.  "Afghanistan" is a loose confederacy of tribes and will never be fully under the sway of a central government.  

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On 10/9/2021 at 11:37 AM, and then said:

Of those Afghans who WERE evacuated, HUNDREDS are just walking away from the military bases where they were to be held until properly vetted.  Nice, huh?  

Post a link !

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On 10/30/2021 at 8:51 AM, and then said:

This is a fact that too few are aware of.  "Afghanistan" is a loose confederacy of tribes and will never be fully under the sway of a central government.  

I think the way things are going Chinas next to try, and honestly after they are through the Taliban will be begging the World fir help!

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14 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

I think the way things are going Chinas next to try, and honestly after they are through the Taliban will be begging the World fir help!

I don't. I think they'd be in for as brutal a slog as they had against 10th Corps 1st Marine Division at Chosen. Vietnam fought them to a stand still in '79 and recent skirmishes with the Indian military made them look pretty lame. Their technological superiority will be negated by the terrain, as was that of Russia's and for a large part, the U.S. and it's allies. They won't be merely overrunning Hong Kong, this time.

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5 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

I don't. I think they'd be in for as brutal a slog as they had against 10th Corps 1st Marine Division at Chosen. Vietnam fought them to a stand still in '79 and recent skirmishes with the Indian military made them look pretty lame. Their technological superiority will be negated by the terrain, as was that of Russia's and for a large part, the U.S. and it's allies. They won't be merely overrunning Hong Kong, this time.

I agree with much of what your saying but Afghanistan is a very strange land, I learned this from the time I have spent there. . Throughout 200 years they have never been subjugated by any Nation no matter if the Nation had Superior numbers or technology. I don't really know what Chinas intentions are in Afghanistan, we will have to wait and see what occurs. The United States could have won the war in Afghanistan but Politics drove the decision making process not our military's ability to defeat the Taliban. 

Where the United States screwed up was by allowing our so called friend Pakistan to give safe passage to and harbor our enemies and the enemies of the Afghan people. We should have made it clear to Pakistan they could not have it both wAys and support our enemies while blowing smoke up our butts. They knew from 2002, when we invaded Afghanistan that Osama Bin Laden was in their country and they protected him all those years.

in my opinion a full scale operation should have been used against Pakistan if they would not expel our enemies, if that was done the Taliban would have been totally destroyed. But, our brilliant policy makers Again put our soldiers in a position to fight a war we could never win under the circumstances we were given to accomplish our mission.

JIMO 

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1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

I agree with much of what your saying but Afghanistan is a very strange land, I learned this from the time I have spent there. . Throughout 200 years they have never been subjugated by any Nation no matter if the Nation had Superior numbers or technology. I don't really know what Chinas intentions are in Afghanistan, we will have to wait and see what occurs. The United States could have won the war in Afghanistan but Politics drove the decision making process not our military's ability to defeat the Taliban. 

Where the United States screwed up was by allowing our so called friend Pakistan to give safe passage to and harbor our enemies and the enemies of the Afghan people. We should have made it clear to Pakistan they could not have it both wAys and support our enemies while blowing smoke up our butts. They knew from 2002, when we invaded Afghanistan that Osama Bin Laden was in their country and they protected him all those years.

in my opinion a full scale operation should have been used against Pakistan if they would not expel our enemies, if that was done the Taliban would have been totally destroyed. But, our brilliant policy makers Again put our soldiers in a position to fight a war we could never win under the circumstances we were given to accomplish our mission.

JIMO 

Our mistake was getting so deeply involved in the first place. Nation building was a hopeless endeavor from the beginning. No one has ever ruled more than a fraction of Afghanistan from Kabul and they never will. While our exit was an unmitigated disaster, now that were gone, best to leave the place to the tender mercies of the surrounding nations and the inevitable insurrection against the Taliban, itself. The organized chaos of intersectarian warfare is Afghanistan's natural state. 

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28 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

Our mistake was getting so deeply involved in the first place. Nation building was a hopeless endeavor from the beginning. No one has ever ruled more than a fraction of Afghanistan from Kabul and they never will. While our exit was an unmitigated disaster, now that were gone, best to leave the place to the tender mercies of the surrounding nations and the inevitable insurrection against the Taliban, itself. The organized chaos of intersectarian warfare is Afghanistan's natural state. 

Totally agree that Nation building is complete Failure and foreign policy disaster and I sincerely hope the US has finally learned their lesson, but I won't hold my breath. I went in to Afghanistan the first during the invasion in 2002, and the reason we invaded was valid. I left during the Tora Bora campaign, because special services were no longer needed and because I had retirement paper work in. I also agree that after defeating the Taliban and forcing them out of Afghanistan since we were not able to accomplish our mission ( to kill Bin Laden ) if we were not going after him in Pakistan we should have left. 

But, that wasn't my decision so all I could do is shake my head, and think about a retirement I deserved and I had earned. 

So I think we pretty much see eye to on this subject.

Take Care. 

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1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Totally agree that Nation building is complete Failure and foreign policy disaster and I sincerely hope the US has finally learned their lesson, but I won't hold my breath. I went in to Afghanistan the first during the invasion in 2002, and the reason we invaded was valid. I left during the Tora Bora campaign, because special services were no longer needed and because I had retirement paper work in. I also agree that after defeating the Taliban and forcing them out of Afghanistan since we were not able to accomplish our mission ( to kill Bin Laden ) if we were not going after him in Pakistan we should have left. 

But, that wasn't my decision so all I could do is shake my head, and think about a retirement I deserved and I had earned. 

So I think we pretty much see eye to on this subject.

Take Care. 

We rebuild nations just fine, but you can't rebuild what never existed. We had him cornered in Tora Bora but were duped by duplicitous Afghan "allies" who facilitated his escape, handsomely bribed, I suspect. 

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11 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

We rebuild nations just fine, but you can't rebuild what never existed. We had him cornered in Tora Bora but were duped by duplicitous Afghan "allies" who facilitated his escape, handsomely bribed, I suspect. 

It has never been made clear how he escaped, at that time it was obvious he did. As far as Nation building from everything I saw from 1978 when I joined until 2003 when I retired and then the additional 10.5 years I put in as a contractor I have seen no successful Nation building occur, only disasters. Iraq is next its coming to head and the country is going to split down its seems, that will be another failure coming to your local movie theater soon sadly to say!:no:

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2 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

It has never been made clear how he escaped, at that time it was obvious he did. As far as Nation building from everything I saw from 1978 when I joined until 2003 when I retired and then the additional 10.5 years I put in as a contractor I have seen no successful Nation building occur, only disasters. Iraq is next its coming to head and the country is going to split down its seems, that will be another failure coming to your local movie theater soon sadly to say!:no:

I don't think so. The Kurds know the US will leave, sooner or later and know they can't withstand Turkish and Iranian aggression on their own. I think they'll remain federated with Iraq with local autonomy. The Same with the Kurds of Syria who'll ally themselves, once again, with Damascus. These, countries, whose borders were drawn up, arbitrarily, by Europeans after WW1 and the end of the British Mandate after WW2, have never been held together than by anything other than the peace of the gun.

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1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

I don't think so. The Kurds know the US will leave, sooner or later and know they can't withstand Turkish and Iranian aggression on their own. I think they'll remain federated with Iraq with local autonomy. The Same with the Kurds of Syrian who'll ally themselves, once again, with Damascus. These, countries, whose borders were drawn up, arbitrarily, by Europeans after WW1 and the end of the British mandate after WW2, have never been held together than by anything other than the peace of the gun.

Yes I really agree with what said about the way the Boarders were drawn up in the Middle East, and the British were the biggest perpetrator of this across the board including with Israel becoming state. Between you and me the Kurdish Forces are the only group of Middle Eastern people that I have ever trusted, and I mean with my life. Over the 10 years I worked in the Middle East,

I had a single Kurdish Interpreter and Kurdish Soliders that were used for security, and I feel in love with the Kurdish people and their culture. In all the time I worked in Syria, Afghanistan, or Iraq I never allowed any Arabian Nationals to protect me if my Nuclear, Biological, Chemical team even when we worked in Afghanistan where to my knowledge there are no Kurds the same individuals that I mentioned above came with us.

I even learned passable Kurdish over the years from my interpreter and some of the security personnel we used. I hope your right that Kurdistan somehow stays intact but I will not hold my breath on that issue I am one of those foreigners who believes with all my heart that the Kurds should have a secure Nation of their own more so than the Palestinians or anyother Arabic Group.

The problem with Kurdistan is that it's to tightly wedged by 5 others countries none of those countries except Arminia excepts and supports them. But the Kurds and Kurdistan is well fortified the entire area is like a huge munitions depot and they are prepared for anything. One thing that has p***ed off the Arabs is the fact that the United States has been arming them for more than 25 years, until the Trump Administration. 

During my time in the Middle East I have been to Kurdishstan twice and both times it was with my interpreter while he was visiting family which for me was an honor. Once I was in Kirkuk, and the other time was in Irbil, like I said they are wonderful people and the only true friends we have in the Middle East. When the **** hits the fan in Iraq it will be because of the Sunni and the Fracken Shi'is, the trouble has been simmering since we invaded Iraq, and when I retired in 2019 it was coming to boil. 

Fracken Iran is the source of all the problems in Iraq and since the dam Shi'i are the largest Muslim population they are used to stir the pot, 90% of all terrorist related actions in Iraq are their work. I don't claim to know what the answer is, but I don't really honestly care if the Muslims kill each other, the only thing that is a problem are the innocent civilians who are killed because of the attacks. 

Peace dude. 

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2 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

Yes I really agree with what said about the way the Boarders were drawn up in the Middle East, and the British were the biggest perpetrator of this across the board including with Israel becoming state. Between you and me the Kurdish Forces are the only group of Middle Eastern people that I have ever trusted, and I mean with my life. Over the 10 years I worked in the Middle East,

I had a single Kurdish Interpreter and Kurdish Soliders that were used for security, and I feel in love with the Kurdish people and their culture. In all the time I worked in Syria, Afghanistan, or Iraq I never allowed any Arabian Nationals to protect me if my Nuclear, Biological, Chemical team even when we worked in Afghanistan where to my knowledge there are no Kurds the same individuals that I mentioned above came with us.

I even learned passable Kurdish over the years from my interpreter and some of the security personnel we used. I hope your right that Kurdistan somehow stays intact but I will not hold my breath on that issue I am one of those foreigners who believes with all my heart that the Kurds should have a secure Nation of their own more so than the Palestinians or anyother Arabic Group.

The problem with Kurdistan is that it's to tightly wedged by 5 others countries none of those countries except Arminia excepts and supports them. But the Kurds and Kurdistan is well fortified the entire area is like a huge munitions depot and they are prepared for anything. One thing that has p***ed off the Arabs is the fact that the United States has been arming them for more than 25 years, until the Trump Administration. 

During my time in the Middle East I have been to Kurdishstan twice and both times it was with my interpreter while he was visiting family which for me was an honor. Once I was in Kirkuk, and the other time was in Irbil, like I said they are wonderful people and the only true friends we have in the Middle East. When the **** hits the fan in Iraq it will be because of the Sunni and the Fracken Shi'is, the trouble has been simmering since we invaded Iraq, and when I retired in 2019 it was coming to boil. 

Fracken Iran is the source of all the problems in Iraq and since the dam Shi'i are the largest Muslim population they are used to stir the pot, 90% of all terrorist related actions in Iraq are their work. I don't claim to know what the answer is, but I don't really honestly care if the Muslims kill each other, the only thing that is a problem are the innocent civilians who are killed because of the attacks. 

Peace dude. 

Well, the problem with bringing democracy to Islam is.....you're bring democracy to.....Islam. I hope we keep some sort of liaison with the Kurds in Iraq because they are the most likable and progressive of all Islam. They are beautiful people. They're good fighters, too. I'd love for them to become our version of Gurkhas. 

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1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

Well, the problem with bringing democracy to Islam is.....you're bring democracy to.....Islam. I hope we keep some sort of liaison with the Kurds in Iraq because they are the most likable and progressive of all Islam. They are beautiful people. They're good fighters, too. I'd love for them to become our version of Gurkhas. 

You may be surprised but many Kurds are Christian. The individuals that worked for me all were. But I certainly agree with all your comments above. They are beautiful people and actually based upon genetics .they are also not Arabs. I met my interpreter family member, like I said previously one of his brothers had a beautiful daughter, that blond hair and blue eyes. One thing that struck me was that many people had blond hair and multi-colored eyes, I have no idea where the Kurdish people originally came from, but I am certain they are not in anyway related genetically to the Arab people of the Middle East. 

Take Care man.

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2 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

You may be surprised but many Kurds are Christian. The individuals that worked for me all were. But I certainly agree with all your comments above. They are beautiful people and actually based upon genetics .they are also not Arabs. I met my interpreter family member, like I said previously one of his brothers had a beautiful daughter, that blond hair and blue eyes. One thing that struck me was that many people had blond hair and multi-colored eyes, I have no idea where the Kurdish people originally came from, but I am certain they are not in anyway related genetically to the Arab people of the Middle East. 

Take Care man.

They are of Iranian origin and the different groups speak a variety of languages and dialects. 

History of the Kurds - Wikipedia

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5 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

They are of Iranian origin and the different groups speak a variety of languages and dialects. 

History of the Kurds - Wikipedia

Hope all is well man and thanks for the link, but it seemed a little weird to me because on an ethnic level they don't appear to be Arab related. So I dug a little deeper in their genetics and I found something that makes more sense, to me. The genetic historical history of the Kurds below is traced back to 6000 BC to the Hurrians which is a non-Semitic group of people like the Sumerians. The original Kurdish - Hurrians spoke a language isolate unrelated to any other Semitic or Non-Semitic group in Mesopotamia. Well that's where I stopped doing research because it answer the question I was after the Kurdish people are Non-Semitic people, which simply means they are  not related to any Semitic Tribe so they are not Arab or even related to any Arabic Tribe.

Thus Middle East peoples from Mediterranean border and Kurds seem originally to belong to a similar ethnic group according to HLA autosomic and Y chromosomes genes results. Kurds have always lived in the mountains being "autochthonous” (6000 BC). Hurrians, whose language was Caucasian (and not Indo-European) may be Kurds ancient genetic background, reviewed in Refs [5,6]. By 1200 BC, Medes and others invaded Hurrian area. Kurdish histori- ans consider that Kurds come from Medes, reviewed in [5]. "Kuru" was the first name of Kurds given by Assyrians (1000 BC) to groups living at Mt. Azu, Kurdistan. Kurds are also mentioned by early classical historians like Polybius (133 BC) and Strabo (48 AD), Kurds were named as “the Mountains People” under Persian, Greek and Roman Anatolian Peninsula rule.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5256937/pdf/pone.0169929.pdf

Who Were the Hurrians - New discoveries in Syria suggest a little-known people fueled the rise of civilization. https://archive.archaeology.org/0807/abstracts/urkesh.html

The Hurrians were a non-Semitic, Indo-European people who originated in Caucasia, or beyond, northeast of Mesopotamia. 

In the late third millennium b.c.e. they migrated from east of the Tigris River across northern Mesopotamia, eventually making their way to the Mediterranean coast in the late second millennium b.c.e. During the time of Naram-Sin, the Hurrians controlled minor states in the vicinity of Akkad. 

Talpuš-atili of Nagar has the distinction of being the oldest known Hurrian ruler; he is attested on an Akkadian seal found at Tell Brak from the end of the third millennium b.c.e. Repeated campaigns were conducted against the Hurrians during the Ur III period, which brought large numbers of Hurrians to Sumer from lands north, northeast, and east of the Tigris. http://earlyworldhistory.blogspot.com/2012/03/hurrians.html

HURRIAN language group:

Hurrian-speaking people was the region of the upper Ñabur and Tigris Rivers, together with the piedmont beyond, extending into the eastern Taurus and northwestern Zagros Mountains. The Hurrian language belongs to neither the Semitic nor the Indo-European language family, nor is it related to Sumerian or Elamite, other important isolated languages of the ancient Near East. It is related to only one other known ancient language, that of Urartu, the kingdom that flourished in the montane regions surrounding Lakes Van, Urmia, and Sevan during the early first millennium b.c.e.; whether Hurrian and Urartian are related to any living languages remains uncertain. https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/hurrian

Take Care 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Hope all is well man and thanks for the link, but it seemed a little weird to me because on an ethnic level they don't appear to be Arab related. So I dug a little deeper in their genetics and I found something that makes more sense, to me. The genetic historical history of the Kurds below is traced back to 6000 BC to the Hurrians which is a non-Semitic group of people like the Sumerians. The original Kurdish - Hurrians spoke a language isolate unrelated to any other Semitic or Non-Semitic group in Mesopotamia. Well that's where I stopped doing research because it answer the question I was after the Kurdish people are Non-Semitic people, which simply means they are  not related to any Semitic Tribe so they are not Arab or even related to any Arabic Tribe.

Thus Middle East peoples from Mediterranean border and Kurds seem originally to belong to a similar ethnic group according to HLA autosomic and Y chromosomes genes results. Kurds have always lived in the mountains being "autochthonous” (6000 BC). Hurrians, whose language was Caucasian (and not Indo-European) may be Kurds ancient genetic background, reviewed in Refs [5,6]. By 1200 BC, Medes and others invaded Hurrian area. Kurdish histori- ans consider that Kurds come from Medes, reviewed in [5]. "Kuru" was the first name of Kurds given by Assyrians (1000 BC) to groups living at Mt. Azu, Kurdistan. Kurds are also mentioned by early classical historians like Polybius (133 BC) and Strabo (48 AD), Kurds were named as “the Mountains People” under Persian, Greek and Roman Anatolian Peninsula rule.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5256937/pdf/pone.0169929.pdf

Who Were the Hurrians - New discoveries in Syria suggest a little-known people fueled the rise of civilization. https://archive.archaeology.org/0807/abstracts/urkesh.html

The Hurrians were a non-Semitic, Indo-European people who originated in Caucasia, or beyond, northeast of Mesopotamia. 

In the late third millennium b.c.e. they migrated from east of the Tigris River across northern Mesopotamia, eventually making their way to the Mediterranean coast in the late second millennium b.c.e. During the time of Naram-Sin, the Hurrians controlled minor states in the vicinity of Akkad. 

Talpuš-atili of Nagar has the distinction of being the oldest known Hurrian ruler; he is attested on an Akkadian seal found at Tell Brak from the end of the third millennium b.c.e. Repeated campaigns were conducted against the Hurrians during the Ur III period, which brought large numbers of Hurrians to Sumer from lands north, northeast, and east of the Tigris. http://earlyworldhistory.blogspot.com/2012/03/hurrians.html

HURRIAN language group:

Hurrian-speaking people was the region of the upper Ñabur and Tigris Rivers, together with the piedmont beyond, extending into the eastern Taurus and northwestern Zagros Mountains. The Hurrian language belongs to neither the Semitic nor the Indo-European language family, nor is it related to Sumerian or Elamite, other important isolated languages of the ancient Near East. It is related to only one other known ancient language, that of Urartu, the kingdom that flourished in the montane regions surrounding Lakes Van, Urmia, and Sevan during the early first millennium b.c.e.; whether Hurrian and Urartian are related to any living languages remains uncertain. https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/hurrian

Take Care 

 

 

The Persians, or Iranians are not a Semitic people, nor is their language a Semitic tongue.

Wikipedia

Persian , also known by its endonym Farsi (فارسی, Fārsī, [fɒːɾˈsiː] (listen)), is a Western Iranian language belonging to the Iranian branch of the Indo-Iranian subdivision of the Indo-European languages. Persian is a pluricentric language predominantly spoken and used officially within Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan in three mutually intelligible standard varieties, namely Iranian Persian (officially known as Farsi), Afghan Persian (officially known as Dari since 1964) and Tajiki Persian (officially known as Tajik since 1999). It is also spoken natively in the Tajik variety by a significant population within Uzbekistan, as well as within other regions with a Persianate history in the cultural sphere of Greater Iran. It is written officially within Iran and Afghanistan in the Persian alphabet, a derivation of the Arabic script, and within Tajikistan in the Tajik alphabet, a derivation of the Cyrillic script. Modern Persian is a continuation of Middle Persian, an official language of the Sasanian Empire (224–651 CE), itself a continuation of Old Persian, which was used in the Achaemenid Empire (550–330 BCE). It originated in the region of Fars (Persia) in southwestern Iran. Its grammar is similar to that of many European languages. Throughout history, Persian was used as a prestigious language by various empires centered in Western Asia, Central Asia, and South Asia. Old Persian is attested in Old Persian cuneiform on inscriptions from between the 6th and 4th century BC. Middle Persian is attested in Aramaic-derived scripts (Pahlavi and Manichaean) on inscriptions and in Zoroastrian and Manichaean scriptures from between the third to the tenth centuries (See Middle Persian literature). New Persian literature was first recorded in the ninth century, after the Muslim conquest of Persia, since then adopting the Arabic script. Persian was the first language to break through the monopoly of Arabic on writing in the Muslim world, with Persian poetry becoming a tradition in many eastern courts. It was used officially as a language of bureaucracy even by non-native speakers…

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13 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

The Persians, or Iranians are not a Semitic people, nor is their language a Semitic tongue.

Wikipedia

Persian , also known by its endonym Farsi (فارسی, Fārsī, [fɒːɾˈsiː] (listen)), is a Western Iranian language belonging to the Iranian branch of the Indo-Iranian subdivision of the Indo-European languages. Persian is a pluricentric language predominantly spoken and used officially within Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan in three mutually intelligible standard varieties, namely Iranian Persian (officially known as Farsi), Afghan Persian (officially known as Dari since 1964) and Tajiki Persian (officially known as Tajik since 1999). It is also spoken natively in the Tajik variety by a significant population within Uzbekistan, as well as within other regions with a Persianate history in the cultural sphere of Greater Iran. It is written officially within Iran and Afghanistan in the Persian alphabet, a derivation of the Arabic script, and within Tajikistan in the Tajik alphabet, a derivation of the Cyrillic script. Modern Persian is a continuation of Middle Persian, an official language of the Sasanian Empire (224–651 CE), itself a continuation of Old Persian, which was used in the Achaemenid Empire (550–330 BCE). It originated in the region of Fars (Persia) in southwestern Iran. Its grammar is similar to that of many European languages. Throughout history, Persian was used as a prestigious language by various empires centered in Western Asia, Central Asia, and South Asia. Old Persian is attested in Old Persian cuneiform on inscriptions from between the 6th and 4th century BC. Middle Persian is attested in Aramaic-derived scripts (Pahlavi and Manichaean) on inscriptions and in Zoroastrian and Manichaean scriptures from between the third to the tenth centuries (See Middle Persian literature). New Persian literature was first recorded in the ninth century, after the Muslim conquest of Persia, since then adopting the Arabic script. Persian was the first language to break through the monopoly of Arabic on writing in the Muslim world, with Persian poetry becoming a tradition in many eastern courts. It was used officially as a language of bureaucracy even by non-native speakers…

Thanks:tu: I wasn't aware of that, I have never checked out the Genetics of the Iranian people, because I honestly think that they are worst than the Saudis when it comes to supporting terrorism, so for me they can burn in hell. But, according to what I found about the Kurds Along with their origin, original language and genetics they are separate from the Iranian origin.

Thanks for the conversation, I have enjoyed it very much and I appreciate it!:tu:

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17 minutes ago, Manwon Lender said:

Thanks:tu: I wasn't aware of that, I have never checked out the Genetics of the Iranian people, because I honestly think that they are worst than the Saudis when it comes to supporting terrorism, so for me they can burn in hell. But, according to what I found about the Kurds Along with their origin, original language and genetics they are separate from the Iranian origin.

Thanks for the conversation, I have enjoyed it very much and I appreciate it!:tu:

Here's a link you may find informative, as well.

Genetic HLA Study of Kurds in Iraq, Iran and Tbilisi (Caucasus, Georgia): Relatedness and Medical Implications (plos.org)

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34 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

Thanks I will save it and check it out later!

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According to Sun Tzu in the, "Art of Warfare." Fighting a war in a far away land has a consequence, which is impoverishing the homeland. This is exactly what we are seeing. There is more advice which isn't being followed. Long drawn out wars are supposed to be avoided. It is also instructed to avoid baiting techniques. This is what I see when the Supreme Leader of Iran is stealing boats and taunting other nations. I think they are aware of this and using it. Even though we have better armies, that won't matter at all if we are disobeying logic and letting our resources be depleted. We'll be like a third world army in no time for repeated mistakes.

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Something to ponder over... 

Quote
7 Jul 2009 — The 27 Articles of T.E. Lawrence · 1. Go easy for the first few weeks. · 2. Learn all you can about your Ashraf and Bedu. · 3. In matters of ...
 
~
T.E. Lawrence
from The Arab Bulletin, 20 August 1917
 
Twenty-Seven Articles
...

~

From someone who actually had some success at making it work instead of worse... 

~

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On 11/3/2021 at 4:55 AM, The_Phantom_Stranger said:

We'll be like a third world army in no time for repeated mistakes.

The mullahs have a LOT worse enemy to be concerned with than the U.S.  Israel simply cannot afford to let them gain a nuclear stranglehold on the region.  As Golda Meir once said:

We Jews have a secret weapon in our struggle with the Arabs; we have no place to go.

 

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The church I attend will be helping 500 Afghani refugees resettle here in the Midwest. Many of the refugees have no possessions at all, so once they’ve been placed in suitable living arrangements there will be volunteers helping out with basic supplies, transportation, and general cultural transition. It’ll be an interesting experience.

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