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Did Ancient People Use Acid to Shape Stone?


WVK
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How did Pre- and Early Dynastic Egyptians hollow out vases from solid lumps of hard diorite and syenite rock? How did they create the tubular drill holes? How did the Dynastic Egyptians cut huge granite obelisks and intricate statues, and how did the Saite Period Egyptians cut, shape and polish their granite creations? These are questions that have long been debated and whilst the convention answers are metal tools, combined with water and sand, this isn't accepted by many. The Ancient Pre-Inca Peruvian stone walls have also been the subject of much speculation and whilst the experts say that rubbing them against one another will cause them to mold together, some of the stones are so intricate that this seems unlikely. They also have a find-grained, vitreous outer surface in places as well, as well as a finer grain size at the joints. A few months ago I did a video looking at the work of Helmut Tributsch, who wrote a paper claiming that acid, a by-product of Inca mines, was what was used to soften stone. In this video, I look at the work of Lia Mangolini and her idea that Hydrofluoric Acid, obtained from certain plants would have been farmed and used to soften, melt and mold stone. You can read her article from the Ancient Origins website at https://www.ancient-origins.net/histo.

 

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I'm sure they knew of or at least understood base components of LSD, if nothing but a basic chemical structure 

oh, THAT acid... nvm... 

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The narrator claims that acid can make the rock malleable like playdough. What, no demonstration??

Please.

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51 minutes ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

The narrator claims that acid can make the rock malleable like playdough. What, no demonstration??

Please.

More speculation:

 

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32 minutes ago, WVK said:

More speculation:

 

Can you point to when the 'acid' method was lost and when they started using 'regular', (abrasives, bashing, pecking, etc.) and what evidence supports this change in technology?

 

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1 hour ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

The narrator claims that acid can make the rock malleable like playdough. What, no demonstration??

Please.

I wonder if it is malleable why stone chips are always found at quarries and building sites and how are unfinished - abandoned stones - left showing use of regular methods on them?

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If the acid makes the rock pliable, how did they manipulate the acid affected rock without burning themselves?

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And how did they neutralize the acid afterward?

Now, it IS possible to soften and etch away limestone with vinegar. I've done it.  But it takes a heck of a lot longer than drilling and scraping.

A HECK of a lot longer.  Like... days versus hours.

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7 hours ago, WVK said:

How did Pre- and Early Dynastic Egyptians hollow out vases from solid lumps of hard diorite and syenite rock? How did they create the tubular drill holes? How did the Dynastic Egyptians cut huge granite obelisks and intricate statues, and how did the Saite Period Egyptians cut, shape and polish their granite creations? These are questions that have long been debated and whilst the convention answers are metal tools, combined with water and sand, this isn't accepted by many. The Ancient Pre-Inca Peruvian stone walls have also been the subject of much speculation and whilst the experts say that rubbing them against one another will cause them to mold together, some of the stones are so intricate that this seems unlikely. They also have a find-grained, vitreous outer surface in places as well, as well as a finer grain size at the joints. A few months ago I did a video looking at the work of Helmut Tributsch, who wrote a paper claiming that acid, a by-product of Inca mines, was what was used to soften stone. In this video, I look at the work of Lia Mangolini and her idea that Hydrofluoric Acid, obtained from certain plants would have been farmed and used to soften, melt and mold stone. You can read her article from the Ancient Origins website at https://www.ancient-origins.net/histo.

 

Zoser.. Is that you? 

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6 hours ago, HandsomeGorilla said:

I'm sure they knew of or at least understood base components of LSD, if nothing but a basic chemical structure 

oh, THAT acid... nvm... 

 I think you just stumbled on the inspiration  for all of those paintings, statuers, and carvings  of zoomorphic gods.

"Up the Nile man!  Check out that awesome dude over there with the head of a jackal. Way cool. He must be a god or something weird."

"Uh oh, he's looking at us, he's looking at us! . Damn dude, he has glowing red eyes". 

"Just act normal Ptenisnet ,calm down and keep walking."  

"When we come down I'm gonna carve a statue of him for sure dude, if I remember."

 

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I can only imagine how much dumb they packed into that video.

Imagine because knowing the premise, there's no f'ing way I'm wasting any of my life watching it.

 

I feel like I need a shower after just giving it this much attention.

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2 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

"Just act normal Ptenisnet ,calm down and keep walking."  

Oh the tales they were Sold... and saw

Quote
Ancient Egypt on 5 Deben a Day (Traveling on 5) Paperback – November 1, 2010 · Foreigners might be bewildered by animal-headed deities and what ...
image.jpeg.e646d1bb7a2bd380903942273d9ed608.jpeg
 
 
image.jpeg.59c9f49a6fb1d6b21e559a0419fe67ca.jpeg
 
 
Well, look no further than Donald P. Ryan's Ancient Egypt on Five Deben A Day! A must-have guide to affordable travel in Pharaonic...

~

 

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10 hours ago, WVK said:

These are questions that have long been debated and whilst the convention answers are metal tools, combined with water and sand, this isn't accepted by many.

Yeah. It pretty much is. Especially by those in the relevant fields.

You know what really isn't accepted or even entertained by many? 

That anybody melted rocks with acid and shaped them and then they turned back into solid rock. 

10 hours ago, WVK said:

In this video, I look at the work of Lia Mangolini and her idea that Hydrofluoric Acid, obtained from certain plants would have been farmed and used to soften, melt and mold stone.

Is there an actual demonstration of this technique used to make comparable structures?

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38 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

I'm getting flashbacks of Zoser...

No, but the OP started a thread on the same subject when he first joined and was trounced by Hans and Swede. :yes:

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14 hours ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

The narrator claims that acid can make the rock malleable like playdough. What, no demonstration??

Please.

Test have been done with surprising results

 

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17 hours ago, WVK said:

How did Pre- and Early Dynastic Egyptians hollow out vases from solid lumps of hard diorite and syenite rock? How did they create the tubular drill holes?

If you really wondered about this, you would have already read this book.

Experiments in Egyptian Archaeology - Denys Stocks

Not to mention you would have already viewed the literally SCORES of videos on Youtube showing people doing exactly this.

17 hours ago, WVK said:

In this video, I look at the work of Lia Mangolini and her idea that Hydrofluoric Acid, obtained from certain plants would have been farmed and used to soften, melt and mold stone. You can read her article from the Ancient Origins website at https://www.ancient-origins.net/histo.

If you use any acid on any stone, you will never "mold" the result into anything. Limestone and other sedimentary stone (including metamorphic versions of the same) would dissolve away. Any igneous stone you applied acid to (assuming it was strong enough to do anything at all to the stone) would result in a pile of etched crystals, not "softened" stone amenable to "molding."

Harte

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43 minutes ago, WVK said:

Test have been done with surprising results

Results so surprising that no one can repeat them.

Harte

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38 minutes ago, Harte said:

Results so surprising that no one can repeat them.

Harte

If you were to look at the video you will find the he agrees with established opinion,, not molded

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18 hours ago, WVK said:

How did Pre- and Early Dynastic Egyptians hollow out vases from solid lumps of hard diorite and syenite rock? How did they create the tubular drill holes? How did the Dynastic Egyptians cut huge granite obelisks and intricate statues, and how did the Saite Period Egyptians cut, shape and polish their granite creations? These are questions that have long been debated and whilst the convention answers are metal tools, combined with water and sand, this isn't accepted by many. The Ancient Pre-Inca Peruvian stone walls have also been the subject of much speculation and whilst the experts say that rubbing them against one another will cause them to mold together, some of the stones are so intricate that this seems unlikely. They also have a find-grained, vitreous outer surface in places as well, as well as a finer grain size at the joints. A few months ago I did a video looking at the work of Helmut Tributsch, who wrote a paper claiming that acid, a by-product of Inca mines, was what was used to soften stone. In this video, I look at the work of Lia Mangolini and her idea that Hydrofluoric Acid, obtained from certain plants would have been farmed and used to soften, melt and mold stone. You can read her article from the Ancient Origins website at https://www.ancient-origins.net/histo.

 

A couple of names that will help you:

Colonel Percy Fawcett;

Hiram Bingham;

Davidovits;

Zoser;

Abramelin;

Some Peruvian bird.

And most of all: some common plant you can buy in any flowershop, a plant no one was able to identify. A plant with red, fleshy leaves, and about a foot high, growing next to a Bolivian river called Pirené or something. It eroded the metal on some cowboys boots when he was walking through a field covered with these plants.

Good luck.

 

 

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