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NYC investigators identify two more 9/11 victims, 20 years on


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

New York City investigators have identified two more people killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11 as the US approaches the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks.

The NYC office of chief medical examiner said it had used DNA analysis to identify Dorothy Morgan and a man whose name is being withheld at the request of his family.

They become the 1,646th and 1,647th victims to be identified. Of the 2,753 people killed at the World Trade Center, 1,106 remain officially unidentified.

“Twenty years ago, we made a promise to the families of World Trade Center victims to do whatever it takes for as long as it takes to identify their loved ones, and with these two new identifications, we continue to fulfill that sacred obligation,” Barbara A Sampson, the chief medical examiner of the city of New York, said in a statement.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/08/new-york-investigators-9-11-world-trade-center

https://www.npr.org/2021/09/08/1035046778/9-11-victims-identified-using-new-technology

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  • The title was changed to NYC investigators identify two more 9/11 victims, 20 years on
 

I was listening to a commentator this morning and they made a couple points about 9/11 that caught my attention.  The first was that being 20 years on now, there are kids in college who weren’t even alive when 9/11 happened, it’s kinda of hard to believe it was twenty years ago and that there is this new generation that only know of 9/11 from a secondhand perspective (meaning they didn’t witness 9/11 as it unfolded). 
 

The 2nd point was the more important of the two. This commentator described how 9/11 was a day of absolute terror and horror. Easily one of the worst days in American history and clearly the worst day in our lifetimes. However, the absolute horror of 9/11 was immediately follow on 9/12 by the single greatest outpouring of love and compassion for our fellow Americans of our lifetimes. For a brief time all of our differences disappeared, there were no party lines, no identity politics or competing ideologies. We were all unified as Americans and genuinely recognized each other as being our neighbors and our brothers and sisters.

There are a lot of things I remember about 9/11 but that is one thing that seems to be more easily forgotten. Considering how divided and polarizing America is today and that there is this new generation that wasn’t even alive then, perhaps one of the most important lessons of 9/11, one of the most important things we can remember, is who were were on the 12th.

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27 minutes ago, el midgetron said:

I was listening to a commentator this morning and they made a couple points about 9/11 that caught my attention.  The first was that being 20 years on now, there are kids in college who weren’t even alive when 9/11 happened, it’s kinda of hard to believe it was twenty years ago and that there is this new generation that only know of 9/11 from a secondhand perspective (meaning they didn’t witness 9/11 as it unfolded). 
 

The 2nd point was the more important of the two. This commentator described how 9/11 was a day of absolute terror and horror. Easily one of the worst days in American history and clearly the worst day in our lifetimes. However, the absolute horror of 9/11 was immediately follow on 9/12 by the single greatest outpouring of love and compassion for our fellow Americans of our lifetimes. For a brief time all of our differences disappeared, there were no party lines, no identity politics or competing ideologies. We were all unified as Americans and genuinely recognized each other as being our neighbors and our brothers and sisters.

There are a lot of things I remember about 9/11 but that is one thing that seems to be more easily forgotten. Considering how divided and polarizing America is today and that there is this new generation that wasn’t even alive then, perhaps one of the most important lessons of 9/11, one of the most important things we can remember, is who were were on the 12th.

Hi El midgetron

That is one that we experienced but the bombing of Hawaii by the Japanese was every bit as devastating to people at that time and would think that the civil war during it's time was in the same range as it divided your country and affected many families.

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40 minutes ago, el midgetron said:

I was listening to a commentator this morning and they made a couple points about 9/11 that caught my attention.  The first was that being 20 years on now, there are kids in college who weren’t even alive when 9/11 happened, it’s kinda of hard to believe it was twenty years ago and that there is this new generation that only know of 9/11 from a secondhand perspective (meaning they didn’t witness 9/11 as it unfolded). 
 

The 2nd point was the more important of the two. This commentator described how 9/11 was a day of absolute terror and horror. Easily one of the worst days in American history and clearly the worst day in our lifetimes. However, the absolute horror of 9/11 was immediately follow on 9/12 by the single greatest outpouring of love and compassion for our fellow Americans of our lifetimes. For a brief time all of our differences disappeared, there were no party lines, no identity politics or competing ideologies. We were all unified as Americans and genuinely recognized each other as being our neighbors and our brothers and sisters.

There are a lot of things I remember about 9/11 but that is one thing that seems to be more easily forgotten. Considering how divided and polarizing America is today and that there is this new generation that wasn’t even alive then, perhaps one of the most important lessons of 9/11, one of the most important things we can remember, is who were were on the 12th.

yea pretty much, i remember that day, there was almost no crime reported that day, but i do not think this would happen today, if anything young thugs would use the situation to rob stores more. and commit more crimes,  the generation you're talking about is very different. 

Edited by aztek
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42 minutes ago, closed for business said:

Hi El midgetron

That is one that we experienced but the bombing of Hawaii by the Japanese was every bit as devastating to people at that time and would think that the civil war during it's time was in the same range as it divided your country and affected many families.

This commentator described how 9/11 was a day of absolute terror and horror. Easily one of the worst days in American history and clearly the worst day in our lifetimes.”

Indeed I did neglect that “our lifetimes” still included many who were alive during WW2 and Pearl Harbor. It was an unintentional error and not a judgement on the significance of that day. 
 

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