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Still Waters

BMA drops opposition to assisted dying and adopts neutral stance

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Still Waters

The British Medical Association (BMA) has dropped its opposition to assisted dying and adopted a neutral stance on the issue.

The doctors’ union, which represents about 150,000 medics, voted to change its official position following a debate by members at its annual representative meeting in London. It had opposed legalising assisted dying since 2006.

Campaigners seeking a change in the law welcomed the “historic milestone” and said it could help pave the way towards a future change in the law.

Some 49% of the BMA’s representative body voted in favour of a motion for it to move to a position of neutrality on assisted dying, including physician assisted dying, with 48% against it and 3% abstaining.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/sep/14/bma-drops-opposition-assisted-dying-adopts-neutral-stance

https://news.sky.com/story/british-medical-association-drops-opposition-to-assisted-dying-12408024

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ouija ouija

I wish the process of legalising voluntary euthanasia would speed up a bit. :hmm:

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quiXilver

At last, some sign of progress.

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aztek
1 hour ago, ouija ouija said:

I wish the process of legalising voluntary euthanasia would speed up a bit. :hmm:

do you really care if you committed a crime when you are dead?  

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Cookie Monster
2 hours ago, Still Waters said:

The British Medical Association (BMA) has dropped its opposition to assisted dying and adopted a neutral stance on the issue.

The doctors’ union, which represents about 150,000 medics, voted to change its official position following a debate by members at its annual representative meeting in London. It had opposed legalising assisted dying since 2006.

Campaigners seeking a change in the law welcomed the “historic milestone” and said it could help pave the way towards a future change in the law.

Some 49% of the BMA’s representative body voted in favour of a motion for it to move to a position of neutrality on assisted dying, including physician assisted dying, with 48% against it and 3% abstaining.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/sep/14/bma-drops-opposition-assisted-dying-adopts-neutral-stance

https://news.sky.com/story/british-medical-association-drops-opposition-to-assisted-dying-12408024

In our House of Lords sits the clergy.

It wont pass.

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ouija ouija
1 hour ago, aztek said:

do you really care if you committed a crime when you are dead?  

I'm not talking about suicide with no outside help, I'm talking about people who need help to end their own lives(perhaps because illness has left them bedridden, for instance) . . . 'assisted dying'. Currently, people who assist can be charged with murder.

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LV-426
18 hours ago, Cookie Monster said:

In our House of Lords sits the clergy.

It wont pass.

 

It's a valid point on the clergy, but the House of Lords couldn't ultimately block any major bill due to the Parliament Acts and the Salisbury Convention.

The real question would be the split in the Commons, as it's a highly emotive, ethical and personal issue that would cross party lines.

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The Silver Shroud

"Grandma wanted to die. She wanted us to inherit the house while we were still young."

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Cookie Monster
4 hours ago, LV-426 said:

It's a valid point on the clergy, but the House of Lords couldn't ultimately block any major bill due to the Parliament Acts and the Salisbury Convention.

The real question would be the split in the Commons, as it's a highly emotive, ethical and personal issue that would cross party lines.

Going off past precedents it will pass the commons, go up to the Lords, and the Church of England will block it.

Its the Church that needs convincing (the major stumbling block), and religious Lords (a secondary issue). I dont see it happening.

Edited by Cookie Monster

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