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Manwon Lender

Smart” Shirt Uses Flexible Carbon Nanotube Fibers To Keep Tabs on the Heart

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Manwon Lender

Rice’s flexible carbon nanotube fibers woven into clothing gather accurate EKG, heart rate. There’s no need to don uncomfortable smartwatches or chest straps to monitor your heart if your comfy shirt can do a better job. That’s the idea behind “smart clothing” developed by a Rice University lab, which employed its conductive nanotube thread to weave functionality into regular apparel. https://scitechdaily.com/smart-shirt-uses-flexible-carbon-nanotube-fibers-to-keep-tabs-on-the-heart/

 

 

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Desertrat56

I think I will keep the smart watch.

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Manwon Lender
10 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I think I will keep the smart watch.

I think this new technology may be very helpful for those living at home that need 24/7 monitoring. The key attribute to this technology is that it is more accurate and thus more effective than other systems. But, it certainly doesn't look that comfortable but who knows anyway Nanotechnology is the future.

Take Care 

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toast

CRP is a material with many excellent properties but with some disadvantages as well. One of these is the recycling of that material which is not that cheap/easy because it require very special processes. In my homecountry, CRP is not allowed to get disposed on landfills so CRP waste have to get disposed/processed by specialized disposal companies. Disposal in accordance with environmental regulations is not an issue when its about stuff like aircraft/wind turbine/automotive etc.parts But, I see an upcoming issue with small parts made out of CRP, like daily life stuff like pens or like the shirt shown in the video because I dont think that people take these parts into the regular chain of disposal but waste them with the household waste instead. This will result into environmental pollution by means of fibrous material and harmful to health CRP dust by erosion later on.

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Manwon Lender
1 hour ago, toast said:

CRP is a material with many excellent properties but with some disadvantages as well. One of these is the recycling of that material which is not that cheap/easy because it require very special processes. In my homecountry, CRP is not allowed to get disposed on landfills so CRP waste have to get disposed/processed by specialized disposal companies. Disposal in accordance with environmental regulations is not an issue when its about stuff like aircraft/wind turbine/automotive etc.parts But, I see an upcoming issue with small parts made out of CRP, like daily life stuff like pens or like the shirt shown in the video because I dont think that people take these parts into the regular chain of disposal but waste them with the household waste instead. This will result into environmental pollution by means of fibrous material and harmful to health CRP dust by erosion later on.

You know I had no idea the material was hazardous, which it can be is fibers are allowed to enter your lungs. But, what's strange is that they are actually in the process of testing then for use in other parts of the human body as outlined in the link in the OP and I quote:

""Pasquali’s lab introduced carbon nanotube fiber in 2013. Since then the fibers, each containing tens of billions of nanotubes, have been studied for use as bridges to repair damaged hearts, as electrical interfaces with the brain, for use in cochlear implants, as flexible antennas and for automotive and aerospace applications. Their development is also part of the Rice-based Carbon Hub, a multiuniversity research initiative led by Rice and launched in 2019.""

Also this material isn't the same as you outlined above as CRP. The CRPs are actually a polymer or plastic as outlined in the quote below:

Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (American English), carbon-fibre-reinforced polymers (Commonwealth English), or carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics, or carbon-fiber reinforced-thermoplastic (CFRPCRPCFRTP, also known as carbon fibercarbon composite, or just carbon), are extremely strong and light fiber-reinforced plastics that contain carbon fibers. CFRPs can be expensive to produce, but are commonly used wherever high strength-to-weight ratio and stiffness (rigidity) are required, such as aerospace, superstructures of ships, automotive, civil engineering, sports equipment, and an increasing number of consumer and technical applications. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon-fiber-reinforced_polymers

So in the end while the material you described CRPs are different than CNT /  CNFs they both do have similar negative aspects to them as far as human health and disposal is concerned. In the quoted information from the link in the OP I wonder how they must treat the material fir use on or inside the human body like they talking about above. https://mdpi-res.com/d_attachment/nanomaterials/nanomaterials-11-00745/article_deploy/nanomaterials-11-00745-v3.pdf

Hey anyway my friend thanks for your post I did learn something new, and that's always a great thing!:tu:

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toast
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Also this material isn't the same as you outlined above as CRP.

Thats correct but the carbon nanotube fibers (woven into the shirt) are an even more dangerous material if absorbed to human lungs. We are still in the beginning of nano particle technology and it has been shown already that this materials pose a risk to the human body in various kinds. I dont say nano particle technology should be avoided in general, on the contrary because there are benefits of that material if used under controlled conditions. But in everything else, like in cosmetics/toothpaste/car polish etc its dangerous on the long run.

Quote

Chronic effects of CNTs on lung cellular behaviors

Because of the similarity between CNTs and asbestos fibers in terms of high aspect ratio, route of exposure and biopersistence, there is a great concern about the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs. Inhaled CNTs have been shown to penetrate the alveolar epithelium, enter the interstitial compartment where the clearance rate is low

Study here

 

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Manwon Lender
12 minutes ago, toast said:

Thats correct but the carbon nanotube fibers (woven into the shirt) are an even more dangerous material if absorbed to human lungs. We are still in the beginning of nano particle technology and it has been shown already that this materials pose a risk to the human body in various kinds. I dont say nano particle technology should be avoided in general, on the contrary because there are benefits of that material if used under controlled conditions. But in everything else, like in cosmetics/toothpaste/car polish etc its dangerous on the long run.

 

I agree with you, that's why I don't understand how they can use it in the human body, the way they are taking about using it, it doesn't make an sense to my friend.:tu:

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