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Still Waters

Dinosaurs like T. Rex likely waggled their tails while running

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Still Waters

The magnificently long, spined tails of ancient dinosaurs are unlike anything that's alive today. New research suggests that they elegantly swished side-to-side while their owners walked, and enthusiastically wagged when they ran.

It took around 80 million years for the bird lineage of dinosaurs to lose such lengthy tails, which they did in line with significant changes to body proportions and posture. The fact long tails stuck around so stubbornly suggests they were important for these animals.

But without living examples, how exactly the tails of dinosaurs contributed to their ancient existence isn't fully understood; dinosaur tails have previously been examined for their potential in antipredator defense, within-species communications and also their role in balance and swimming.

New modelling shows they likely played a key function in dinosaur locomotion beyond merely as a counterweight to their upright pose.

https://www.sciencealert.com/fearsome-dinosaurs-like-t-rex-probably-had-elegant-tail-swishes-when-they-ran

https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abi7348

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jethrofloyd

giphy.gif

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Jon the frog

waggy wag wag

T-rex Dog Costume | Dogs | Price: 18,99 €

Edited by Jon the frog

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MissJatti

no wonder why it has Rex it its name

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SD455GTO

Cheetahs use their tail as a rudder while chasing prey. Makes sense really.

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