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Taking a new look at life and death in Giza: how the pyramids built Egypt: Updated 22 September 2021

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jmccr8

I would think that the core area of the pyramids would be far more consistent in temp as the density of the pyramid and it's shape allows for exterior exposure to the sun so there is a continuous heat transfer going on with the exterior as side would cool while others are collecting heat. The core would not heat or cool as fast as exposed sides of the pyramid although seasons might make more of a difference during times of measurement.

It would be interesting if they could do a scan of all 4 sides at the same time 24/7 for a week to watch would the known voids affect certain temps at different times of the day. I would add that it should include a seasonal study.

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Hanslune
4 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

I would think that the core area of the pyramids would be far more consistent in temp as the density of the pyramid and it's shape allows for exterior exposure to the sun so there is a continuous heat transfer going on with the exterior as side would cool while others are collecting heat. The core would not heat or cool as fast as exposed sides of the pyramid although seasons might make more of a difference during times of measurement.

It would be interesting if they could do a scan of all 4 sides at the same time 24/7 for a week to watch would the known voids affect certain temps at different times of the day. I would add that it should include a seasonal study.

I have suggested that the forces of the fringe & Alt. band together and organize, raise money and arrange to do this an other testing they are interested in but they all seem to prefer NOT do so.

Perhaps some university might do so but not sure who would fund it.

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jmccr8
3 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

I have suggested that the forces of the fringe & Alt. band together and organize, raise money and arrange to do this an other testing they are interested in but they all seem to prefer NOT do so.

Perhaps some university might do so but not sure who would fund it.

Hi Hans

Agreed and to be hones I expect that there are other useless construction voids in the structure that have no educational purpose.

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Hanslune
Just now, jmccr8 said:

Hi Hans

Agreed and to be hones I expect that there are other useless construction voids in the structure that have no educational purpose.

Yep might be. I also suspect some voids in G2 and other 'lesser' pyramids. Once Covid is dealt with and Universities can get back to their true tasks such research might come about - in 3-5 years I suspect. I think one problem will be that the disease will remain circulating around in 'the shadows of the world' and new variants will come out to shut everything down again.

We shall see. Personally I'm shifting away from Egypt, SA and India and back into an earlier phase when I was studying Assyriology and related subjects and even farther back into time for one more look for something in the Eemian.

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cladking
16 hours ago, Abramelin said:

The cracks are deeper than the rest of the structure. The desert wind cools the surface of the structure, but not the cracks.

Excellent observation but there are several deep flaws and the data are not explained by the hypothesis.

Giza-Pyramid-Scan.jpg

If this were residual heat from solar heating then all the cracks would be hotter instead of only those at the "anomaly".  Also there would not be even hotter stones nearby.  Note that the hottest stone (bottom right quadrat) is at 30 degrees and the crack next to it on either side is cooler.  Then there is the fact they said this was taken in the morning and the effect persists all day long.  

There is something hot behind these stones where Egyptological theory says there should be nothing hot.  Apparently Dr Hawass has already shoved an endoscope into this and found a natural fissure behind it.  But no natural fissure should be hot so this is not an explanation either.  The question merely becomes what is heating the air in the natural fissure behind the thermal anomaly.  

Edited by cladking
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Abramelin
1 hour ago, cladking said:

Excellent observation but there are several deep flaws and the data are not explained by the hypothesis.

Giza-Pyramid-Scan.jpg

 

In fact I was wrong: yellow represents a cooler temperature than red.

The only 'red' stones are those that used to lie one layer deeper, but are now exposed to direct sunlight.

And because they form some sort of cavity, the desert wind has a less cooling effect on them than on the other stones on the surface around the cavity. The cracks between the 'red' stones show up yellow ( = cooler than red) because the sun is less able to penetrate them.

What I like is this discussion about a temperature anomaly: in 'another' thread I brought up a squarish temperature anomaly. However, there are 2 differences: it's located in a shallow sea, and it is more than 11 by 11 kilometers wide above a squarish formation at the seafloor.

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Wistman
18 hours ago, Hanslune said:

When I use to go camping in the Arabian desert it would get cold at night. However, if you dug down a foot or so the sand retained the heat of the day so one could be quite comfortable. The dry air doesn't draw heat as well but humid air does. Despite being a dry place the humidity of the Giza plateau is on average about 60% due to the Nile being nearby. The Delta is also nearby and the sea about a 100 miles away.

[...]

Not to mention the vampire mosquitoes all about the area.   Did you use nets when you camped, or wasn't it a problem where you were?   (sorry - OT)

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cladking
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And because they form some sort of cavity, the desert wind has a less cooling effect on them than on the other stones on the surface around the cavity. The cracks between the 'red' stones show up yellow ( = cooler than red) because the sun is less able to penetrate them.

Yes!  Exactly.   The cracks should be cooler and are cooler all around the hot stones.  

But look at the cracks as you move further away from the hot stones.  You can see the heat leaking out the cracks. 

Giza-Pyramid-Scan.jpg

Look at all the heat leaking out on the left side above the chair shaped stone!!!!

 

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cladking
8 minutes ago, cladking said:

You can see the heat leaking out the cracks. 

You can get a very good estimate of the heat in the corridor behind these stones by merely observing the temperature of the stones where the cracks get cooler than the stone.  It appears the air in the corridor is about in the vicinity of 27 degrees C but it would be necessary to know the configuration of the space behind the stones to know accurately.  

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Tom1200
5 hours ago, cladking said:

Note that the hottest stone (bottom right quadrat) is at 30 degrees and the crack next to it on either side is cooler.

But you said...

But YOU SAID ... the cracks are hotter because there's heat escaping from behind.  Now you're saying the cracks are cooler because there's heat escaping from behind.

  • You've declared without evidence the time and date this image was taken.
  • You've declared without evidence that this effect lasts for half the year.
  • You've claimed that you predicted this effect at this location, even though this point is not where you said it would be.
  • You have made up random values for the temperatures of these rocks, even though the false-colour image tells us exactly what their temperatures are.
  • You've said there is something hot behind this point that's hottest in October but turns cold for half the year.
  • You've declared without evidence there are multiple other significant anomalies.
  • You've said that if you put a cold object next to a warm object they both get hotter.
  • You've said that a heated object is hotter than other objects when they are at their hottest.
  • You utterly ignored the sensible explanations of people who actually know what they're talking about (and me).  You have shown zero grasp of (or interest in) science, notably thermal conductivity, heat capacity and, well, the entire field of thermodynamics.
  • You've accused everyone including, but not limited to, Zahi Hawass, universities, archaeologists, corporate sponsors and everyone who doesn't wholeheartedly agree with you, of conspiracy to keep this anomaly secret and unexplored (even though ZH has already probed and investigated it, etc. etc.)

Are you familiar with the phrase quit while you're ahead?  Well, it doesn't apply here.

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Abramelin
43 minutes ago, cladking said:

Yes!  Exactly.   The cracks should be cooler and are cooler all around the hot stones.  

But look at the cracks as you move further away from the hot stones.  You can see the heat leaking out the cracks. 

Giza-Pyramid-Scan.jpg

Look at all the heat leaking out on the left side above the chair shaped stone!!!!

 

Look again: the left side above the chair shaped stone has broken off. It is thus more exposed to the sun.

And moving away from the hot stones.. there's no heat leaking from the cracks.

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Hanslune
3 hours ago, Wistman said:

Not to mention the vampire mosquitoes all about the area.   Did you use nets when you camped, or wasn't it a problem where you were?   (sorry - OT)

I did most of my desert camping in Oman and the UAE towards the edge of the Empty Quarter. Flies were a problem on a few occasions but I don't recall mossies. I also did some camping in Saudi and Jordan but that tended to be larger parties.

Edited by Hanslune
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Wepwawet

This all like "monkeys dancing around a dd", isn't it Clad, or the Hnw

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Wepwawet
9 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

I did most of my desert camping in Oman and the UAE towards the edge of the Empty Quarter. Flies were a problem on a few occasions but I don't recall mossies. I also did some camping in Saudi and Jordan but that tended to be larger parties.

And as you are here now, clearly you missed the, er, excitement, in those parts back in the days.

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Wistman
24 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

I did most of my desert camping in Oman and the UAE towards the edge of the Empty Quarter. Flies were a problem on a few occasions but I don't recall mossies.

No I wouldn't expect so there.

Once I stayed for a few days in Dubai in late 90's (I didn't have a business visa, but house-guested at the Rep. for Canadian Trade Ministry's house, an old pal), my host drove us to a camel race in Oman, quite an experience.  Obviously we didn't stay there but the night sky was pretty awesome, driving back to the city.

I'm not sure why, but the mosquitoes in Cairo area really are potent, at least for me.  Like the sixth plague had returned. 

Edited by Wistman
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Wepwawet
13 minutes ago, Wistman said:

I'm not sure why, but the mosquitoes in Cairo area really are potent, at least for me.  Like the sixth plague had returned. 

As long as you don't cut yourself while shaving, then dogs howl and the electricity fails and mummies come out of their tombs.

Edited by Wepwawet
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Hanslune
59 minutes ago, Wepwawet said:

And as you are here now, clearly you missed the, er, excitement, in those parts back in the days.

I did. I had just left active duty for the reserves only to be brought back for a year or so later to be 'an angel of death' during the first Desert Storm,  (the guy who called your reserve unit to tell them you were being activated or more commonly to inform you since you weren't being activated I wanted all your E-5/6 MOS x or y' or if you had a specific piece of equipment - to hand it over - mainly water purification and NBC stuff). So fought that war from NYC my MOS not being needed. The second one I got alerted again for a POW assignment but since I was retired by then I was not needed as the war ended very quickly.

Edited by Hanslune
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cladking
Quote

But YOU SAID ... the cracks are hotter because there's heat escaping from behind.  Now you're saying the cracks are cooler because there's heat escaping from behind.

Look at the image and remember heat flows only from higher temperatures to lower temperatures.  The temperature behind the anomaly is less than the sun heated stones so the cracks are cooler than the stones.  But as you move further away from the anomaly the stones are cooler than the temperature behind them so the cracks are warmer.  

By this means you can get a good idea of the shape, location,  and temperature of the void behind the stones. 

  • Quote

    You've declared without evidence there are multiple other significant anomalies.

     

Hawass has said there are other anomalies exactly where I predicted and has even published photos of one.  The video in this thread shows one such anomaly.  

Quote

(even though ZH has already probed and investigated it, etc. etc.)

Zahi stuck and endoscope in it and found a natural fissure and then tried to palm off the existence of this fissure as the cause of the anomaly.  Fissures and science don't work this way.  Fissures don't cause hot spots and you don't quit looking just because you find a fissure.  A "fissure" is only the very first step to finding the cause and not the last step.  

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cladking
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And moving away from the hot stones.. there's no heat leaking from the cracks.

Look near the middle of the lower left quadrant.  

Giza-Pyramid-Scan.jpg

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Hanslune
4 hours ago, cladking said:

Hawass has said there are other anomalies exactly where I predicted and has even published photos of one.  The video in this thread shows one such anomaly. 

No you didn't Cladking you are deliberately lying again. As I stated before reporting you for trolling.

You refused to show us where those four predictions were on the image I provided - the two known heat anomaly are not where you 'predicted'.

 

 

Edited by Hanslune
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Hanslune
8 hours ago, Tom1200 said:

But you said...

But YOU SAID ... the cracks are hotter because there's heat escaping from behind.  Now you're saying the cracks are cooler because there's heat escaping from behind.

  • You've declared without evidence the time and date this image was taken.
  • You've declared without evidence that this effect lasts for half the year.
  • You've claimed that you predicted this effect at this location, even though this point is not where you said it would be.
  • You have made up random values for the temperatures of these rocks, even though the false-colour image tells us exactly what their temperatures are.
  • You've said there is something hot behind this point that's hottest in October but turns cold for half the year.
  • You've declared without evidence there are multiple other significant anomalies.
  • You've said that if you put a cold object next to a warm object they both get hotter.
  • You've said that a heated object is hotter than other objects when they are at their hottest.
  • You utterly ignored the sensible explanations of people who actually know what they're talking about (and me).  You have shown zero grasp of (or interest in) science, notably thermal conductivity, heat capacity and, well, the entire field of thermodynamics.
  • You've accused everyone including, but not limited to, Zahi Hawass, universities, archaeologists, corporate sponsors and everyone who doesn't wholeheartedly agree with you, of conspiracy to keep this anomaly secret and unexplored (even though ZH has already probed and investigated it, etc. etc.)

Are you familiar with the phrase quit while you're ahead?  Well, it doesn't apply here.

Cladking is a free spirit of metaphyical correctness - whatever he says is correct, if it contradicts something he made up earlier that earlier statement is still correct and the latter statement is also correct.

Its one of the tenets of his goofy clown science.

 

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, Trelane said:

No

Isn't it marvelous how he just never gives up even when his wrongness is everywhere - fake predictions and a theory that is 'flexible'.

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Saru

Thread closed for moderator review.

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