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Why You Suddenly Need To Delete Google Chrome


The_Phantom_Stranger
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Posted (edited)

I was putting Jesus into my term paper about Windows when I was studying this in college.

 

I think I used to have this same privacy problem with Chrome before. If I remember right, every now and then it would just happen. I fixed it somehow. Sometimes if you delete all the cookies and cache it might help. I think it might have been some obscure problem in the settings or something else. I'll try to find the page I found that fixed it.

Edited by Green Lion
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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, Green Lion said:

I was putting Jesus into my term paper about Windows when I was studying this in college.

 

I think I used to have this same privacy problem with Chrome before. If I remember right, every now and then it would just happen. I fixed it somehow. Sometimes if you delete all the cookies and cache it might help. I think it might have been some obscure problem in the settings or something else. I'll try to find the page I found that fixed it.

Was Jesus relevant to your term paper or were you just putting Jesus in for the fun of it (or for recruiting purposes? or maybe just to show off what a "good christian" you are?)   How is Jesus relevant to Microsoft Windows?

Edited by Desertrat56
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I honestly can't remember what I did to fix the problem when it happened to me. I think it happened 3 times and was apparently random. I had done nothing different and all of a sudden websites that I was visiting before were coming up as a privacy concern. I did manage to fix it, but it was weird and never happened again. I think when bugs like this happen something might be happening at a magnetic level in the computer. Binary is remembered magnetically in the computer.

 

This might be it:

Quote

7. Try Clearing the SSL State on Your Computer

Clearing the SSL state in Chrome is often overlooked but can come in very handy and is easy to try. Just like clearing your browser’s cache this can help if things get out of sync. To clear the SSL state in Chrome on Windows, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Google Chrome – Settings icon (Settings) icon, and then click Settings.
  2. Click Show advanced settings.
  3. Under Network, click Change proxy settings. The Internet Properties dialog box appears.
  4. Click the Content tab.
  5. Click “Clear SSL state”, and then click OK.
  6. Restart Chrome.
Clear SSL state

Clear SSL state

If you are on a Mac, see these instructions on how to delete an SSL certificate.

8. Change DNS Servers

The next thing you can try is changing your DNS servers. We’ve actually seen the “your connection is not private” error happen before when using Google’s Public DNS (8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4) or Cloudflare’s DNS (1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1). Removing this and defaulting back to your ISP’s DNS servers can sometimes fix DNS errors. Google and Cloudflare aren’t perfect 100% of the time and we’ve issues occur now and then.

To do this on Windows, go to your network connection properties and make sure “Obtain DNS server address automatically” is selected. If you’ve added Google’s Public DNS or Cloudflare’s DNS to your router, you might also have to remove it from there.

Obtain DNS server address automatically

Obtain DNS server address automatically

https://kinsta.com/blog/your-connection-is-not-private/

I think I might have tried uninstalling and reinstalling Chrome, but that didn't work. I can't remember. It must be holding on to this stuff somewhere.

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Posted (edited)

@Green Lion  Do you know anything about Linux? I've cleared Chrome's browser history and it's still happening. I can't open Wiki or the New York Post at all with no override option. I just get a message saying the site uses HSTS, whatever that is. It says attacks are usually temporary and the page should work later. 

Edited by susieice
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11 minutes ago, susieice said:

@Green Lion  Do you know anything about Linux? I've cleared Chrome's browser history and it's still happening. 

The OP on this forum says eventually the problem fixed itself. I think that might have been what happened. Here is what one person said:

Quote

Many problems with SSL certificates can be solved by simply removing the file from the cache folder.

In Chrome or Chromium, the file to be removed is cert9.db in the folder ~/.pki/nssdb. (In Firefox, you’d want to remove cert8.db.)

Attention! After removing these files, you will need to re-register CAs in your browser.

This is solution is for linux systems, the steps for Windows users would be somewhat different.

https://serverfault.com/questions/279984/how-do-i-clear-chromes-ssl-cache

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I actually had a moral dillema when I was in college. After much thought I decided to change my degree. This happened because of the default permission for Linux being set at 666. I didn't think this was a coincidence and it was unnecessary. I had to decide if I was going to serve 666, or rule it. It turns out no matter what you study 666 is waiting somewhere, and in any job.

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51 minutes ago, susieice said:

@Green Lion  Do you know anything about Linux? I've cleared Chrome's browser history and it's still happening. I can't open Wiki or the New York Post at all with no override option. I just get a message saying the site uses HSTS, whatever that is. It says attacks are usually temporary and the page should work later. 

I think that is a different problem. I remember reading something about HSTS. Maybe the internet is just under attack.

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23 hours ago, susieice said:

My Chrome has been acting up for the last week. There's a lot of things I can't open because it comes up as a privacy issue and says someone may be trying to steal my info. Sometimes I have the option to override, sometimes not. 

Same here.  Since Saturday having the exact same issue using a Samsung tablet and Chrome trying to access this forum. Got the same message to override and continue on to site but chickened out.  My phone still works accessing this forum and oddly enough it's a Google pixel 2 phone using Chrome. 

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Posted (edited)

This says to type 

chrome://net-internals/#hsts

into your browser and then go down to the delete domain security policies section and type in the domain you want deleted from HSTS.

Quote

Additionally, if the certificate is not valid, you will be prevented from making a connection. Usually, if a certificate is not valid (expired, self-signed, signed by an unknown CA, etc.) the browser displays a warning that you can circumvent. However, if the site has HSTS, the browser will not let you circumvent the warning at all. To access the site, you must remove the site from the HSTS list within the browser.

 

https://www.acunetix.com/blog/articles/what-is-hsts-why-use-it/

Edited by Green Lion
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17 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Like for example if one of the password services has convinced you how safe it is to let them keep your passwords safe?

But of course, if you give false data, you are concealing data and you do have something to hide.

Never use a password service.

If you give false data, it serves the same purpose while being useless for fraud, and can also be used to trace the source of the attempted fraud.

 

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1 hour ago, Inn Spectre said:

Never use a password service.

That is of course common sense, but many people seem to be ignoring that sensible precaution.

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I recently dumped Chrome and downloaded a new browser just to see how well it would work.  It's called: BRAVE.COM  It's customizable and does many of the things a VPN does as well as saving time and bandwidth.

So far, I love it!

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