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Psychology Meets Archaeology


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Abstract

How important is the influence of spatial acoustics on our mental processes related to sound perception and cognition? There is a large body of research in fields encompassing architecture, musicology, and psychology that analyzes human response, both subjective and objective, to different soundscapes. But what if we want to understand how acoustic environments influenced the human experience of sound in sacred ritual practices in premodern societies? Archaeoacoustics is the research field that investigates sound in the past. One of its branches delves into how sound was used in specific landscapes and at sites with rock art, and why past societies endowed a special significance to places with specific acoustical properties. Taking advantage of the advances made in sound recording and reproduction technologies, researchers are now exploring how ancient social and sacred ceremonies and practices related to the acoustic properties of their sound environment. Here, we advocate for the emergence of a new and innovative discipline, experimental psychoarchaeoacoustics. We also review underlying methodological approaches and discuss the limitations, challenges, and future directions for this new field.

Keywords: archaeoacoustics, spatial acoustics, experimental psychology, subjective evaluation, auralization, psychoarchaeoacoustics

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7775382/

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  • The title was changed to Psychology Meets Archaeology
 
1 hour ago, WVK said:

How important is the influence of spatial acoustics on our mental processes related to sound perception and cognition?

This is your question?

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This has been researched in ancient temples and at Stonehenge.  It's believed that certain frequencies brought on by chanting and music in certain acoustic environments can enhance a trance-like state of being.

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19 hours ago, OverSword said:

This has been researched in ancient temples and at Stonehenge.  It's believed that certain frequencies brought on by chanting and music in certain acoustic environments can enhance a trance-like state of being.

Sound and Sensory Spaces in British Neolithic Burial Monuments

Explore how sound has been used to create ‘sensory spaces’ in British Neolithic burial monuments.

The Neolithic era is the late part of the stone age, ranging from 4000-2500 BCE. It is at this time, that hunter-gatherer communities began settling down and adopting farming as a means of sustenance. It is believed that this shift begun by means of a large group of people moving across the channel and adopt life in Britain. Throughout this period, a number of different burial monuments and practices emerged from across the British Isles, some of which are:

Stone circles

Chambered cairns

Court cairns

Portal tombs

Wedge tombs

https://www.ukessays.com/essays/architecture/sound-and-sensory-spaces-in-british-neolithic-burial-monuments.php

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2 hours ago, WVK said:

No, that was from the paper

I know.

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14 minutes ago, Trelane said:

@WVK, what specifically is your question or what you want to discuss?

I posted for anyone who might find it interesting.

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I rather like the idea that we “won” against the Neanderthals etc as a species because we listened to music. 

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