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Self Esteem and Religion


Sherapy
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What's the definition of a 'religious' nation'?

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3 minutes ago, Likely Guy said:

What's the definition of a 'religious' nation'?

One that practices religious laws. Like islamic sharia.

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2 minutes ago, zep73 said:

One that practices religious laws. Like islamic sharia.

Is that it? Does the US consider themselves as a religious nation? Do any others?

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The United States believes in the Freedom of Religion. The dollar bill says, "In God We Trust." This isn't the Church, but God in general. Render unto Cesar what belongs to Cesar.

Edited by The_Phantom_Stranger
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10 minutes ago, Likely Guy said:

Is that it? Does the US consider themselves as a religious nation? Do any others?

Depends who you ask I guess. The big cities in the US are mainly atheistic, while the rural areas are religious. US law is 100% secular, while some states have laws that are 'biblical'.

 

4 minutes ago, The_Phantom_Stranger said:

Render unto Cesar what belongs to Cesar.

Cesar probably wrote that.

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4 minutes ago, zep73 said:

Cesar probably wrote that.

Hi Zep

Given how many times he was stabbed would indicate to me that not everyone agreed

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42 minutes ago, zep73 said:

If you know that your peers share the same basic truths as yourself, you speak and act more confident, because you do not fear ridicule or shame.

Confidence is basically just feeling safe.

I like this.

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1 minute ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Zep

Given how many times he was stabbed would indicate to me that not everyone agreed

That was Julius. He was just one of the many Caesars. Caesar was the Roman word for Emperor.

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Just now, zep73 said:

That was Julius. He was just one of the many Caesars. Caesar was the Roman word for Emperor.

Hi Zep

Yes I know and was just having some fun

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1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

I'm curious as to how they went about gathering data. Did they just flat out ask people if they had high or low self-esteem?

I actually think this is a good question for NW.

Edited by Sherapy
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2 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Given how many times he was stabbed would indicate to me that not everyone agreed

Actually the blood letting was a normal thing for Rome of the day, it was the idea of a "King" that made the Senate floor baying for blood... 

~

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37 minutes ago, Likely Guy said:

What's the definition of a 'religious' nation'?

Good question for 8ty or Hammer, too. 

Edited by Sherapy
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36 minutes ago, zep73 said:

One that practices religious laws. Like islamic sharia.

That makes sense, I think the article states this too. 

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2 hours ago, Sherapy said:

 An interesting article, interested in posters thoughts. All voices are welcome.
 

 

“The researchers offered a possible explanation for their finding: Religious people feel better about themselves in religious countries not because they're religious, but simply because they fit in with the crowd.”
 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/religion-happiness_n_1219295

 


 

 

And then there is this:

Researchers at three European universities looked at the religious beliefs and self-esteem of users of an online dating service across 11 countries, from the devoutly Catholic Poland to the world's least religious country, Sweden.

The analysis showed that in religious countries, self-esteem was higher among believers than nonbelievers. That was consistent with previous research. But in countries where religion is not central to the culture, the self-esteem of religious people was lower than that of nonbelievers.

The first problem with this article is that it is in The Huffington Post.

  Besides that side cart, we are talking about an analysis of people on dating sites that is said to conclude relevant information about a complete incongruency of their analytical puzzle.  What does being religious and having a high/low self-esteem say about people on a dating site?  All I can gather is that they are saying that people on dating sites who are religious have higher self esteem than people on dating sites who are not religious.  What does one have to do with the other? Does their higher/lower self esteem come from them being religious?  Or does it come from them being on a dating site and just wishing to present that image.

I am going to just concur with Desert Mouse's original thought...sorry...dumb, de dumb, dumb...:rolleyes:

...not to say that you are anything other than brilliant...and adored by many...B)

even though you did post something from the Huffing and Puffington Post....lol

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38 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

I actually think this is a good question for NW.

I didn't dig too deeply into it but it seems that they gathered questionnaire responses from 180k+ participants on a dating site called "eDarling".

The following were used as measures:

They had 10 adjectives: “Calm”, “adaptable”, “cheerful”, “content”, “energetic”, “healthy”, “optimistic”, “positive”, “resilient”, and “stable”. Respondents were asked “How well does each of the following generally describe you?” with a rating from 1 to 7, 1 being not at all and 7 being very much.

Right out of the gate it seems like the adjectives being used would influence a more positive result, even in spite of a rating scale for each one. 

EDIT: Forgot to add the measure for "personal religiosity", where they were asked to what degree did their religion matter, 1 being not at all and 7 being very much.

 

Edited by Nuclear Wessel
forgot a "measure"
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2 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

I think it's just another BS way of bashing the religious, denigrating what they find meaningful in life. People are the same the world over, in my opinion, religious and non religious. Each find their own way of feeling they belong. Well, except perhaps those alienated from their their own kith and kin, of a contrary nature.

I think I agree with that.

Scary I know but...yeah, I think you are correct sir!

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13 minutes ago, joc said:

And then there is this:

Researchers at three European universities looked at the religious beliefs and self-esteem of users of an online dating service across 11 countries, from the devoutly Catholic Poland to the world's least religious country, Sweden.

The analysis showed that in religious countries, self-esteem was higher among believers than nonbelievers. That was consistent with previous research. But in countries where religion is not central to the culture, the self-esteem of religious people was lower than that of nonbelievers.

The first problem with this article is that it is in The Huffington Post.

  Besides that side cart, we are talking about an analysis of people on dating sites that is said to conclude relevant information about a complete incongruency of their analytical puzzle.  What does being religious and having a high/low self-esteem say about people on a dating site?  All I can gather is that they are saying that people on dating sites who are religious have higher self esteem than people on dating sites who are not religious.  What does one have to do with the other? Does their higher/lower self esteem come from them being religious?  Or does it come from them being on a dating site and just wishing to present that image.

I am going to just concur with Desert Mouse's original thought...sorry...dumb, de dumb, dumb...:rolleyes:

...not to say that you are anything other than brilliant...and adored by many...B)

even though you did post something from the Huffing and Puffington Post....lol

Lol, no worries. :D

 

I did find it interesting, 
 

Love your thoughts. :lol:

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13 minutes ago, Nuclear Wessel said:

I didn't dig too deeply into it but it seems that they gathered questionnaire responses from 180k+ participants on a dating site called "eDarling".

Thank you, You are my go to on all things studies. :wub:

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Just now, docyabut2 said:

science of the nuclear bomb :(

Not gonna lie, not a bad point Docy. 
 

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16 minutes ago, Nuclear Wessel said:

I didn't dig too deeply into it but it seems that they gathered questionnaire responses from 180k+ participants on a dating site called "eDarling".

The following were used as measures:

They had 10 adjectives: “Calm”, “adaptable”, “cheerful”, “content”, “energetic”, “healthy”, “optimistic”, “positive”, “resilient”, and “stable”. Respondents were asked “How well does each of the following generally describe you?” with a rating from 1 to 7, 1 being not at all and 7 being very much.

Right out of the gate it seems like the adjectives being used would influence a more positive result, even in spite of a rating scale for each one. 

:nw:

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1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

I'm curious as to how they went about gathering data. Did they just flat out ask people if they had high or low self-esteem?

I am not really sure, I have never been on a dating site before but I think the members fill out questionnaires hopefully to find someone with similar interests, education, religious affiliation, etc. 

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2 hours ago, XenoFish said:

Being in a religious country would be more of a social safety net so self esteem and self confidence in regards to one's religion is kind of a give-in. There's no real competition for beliefs. Though I suspect any collective of believers would have the same or similar effect. As hammer pointed out, even atheist can be high on themselves. 

Appreciate your observations on this. :tsu:

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1 hour ago, Likely Guy said:

Self esteem (positive) can be directly related to self importance (negative). I'm an apatheist who sees himself as just a cog in the wheel.

I like this, too. :wub:

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3 hours ago, Sherapy said:

 An interesting article, interested in posters thoughts. All voices are welcome.

“The researchers offered a possible explanation for their finding: Religious people feel better about themselves in religious countries not because they're religious, but simply because they fit in with the crowd.”

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/religion-happiness_n_1219295

Belonging is a human psychological need, but that is gained from belonging to any collection of people.

Western media outlets are generally quite negative towards religion. You can see that in your article. Its comes across as trying to shoot down religion by portraying it as being about having a sense of belonging.

In the group think present in society its inconceivable that someone who is intelligent, and opened minded, and with the ability to question and criticise, can arrive at the conclusion that there is in fact a God. Its arrogance in its worst form. Its my views are correct or there is something wrong with you. And such group think has been present in Western society on a number of topics for decades.

Group think underpinned by fear is the worst.

Edited by Cookie Monster
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