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The importance of nature in your life


LightAngel

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It was like this officer: These two pelicans sneaked in and one stood watch while the other one made the grab for the fish by scooping in from across the creek. Then both of the felonious fowl took off like they couldn't wait to phone in the ransom demand.

 

Edited by Sojo
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These Marsh Hens like to go after things the high tide pushes in. Most folks probably don't know it, but all those floating dead reeds harbor an amazing amount of spiders and bugs. I couldn't believe how many there were when I had to clean up after hurricanes that pushed all that stuff up onto the yard.

 

 

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@LightAngel I'd just like to say Thanks for starting the thread. You and the other posters have helped me again take notice and pleasure in simply observing the world around us, and taking the time to do so in a little more detail.

I've always loved being in nature and I truly enjoyed watching "Wild America" with Marty Stouffer on television each week when it came on. I don't know if anyone else likes it as much as me, but I thought I'd provide a link about it. Marty does such a great job of getting down into the details of what is happening in nature and it's animals. I currently can watch it on the Roku channel but it's supposed to be available currently on Tubi as well.

Here's an IMDB link about it:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0321020/

Just thought others might want to check it out if they want.

Sojo

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On 11/21/2023 at 2:02 PM, Sojo said:

@LightAngel I'd just like to say Thanks for starting the thread. You and the other posters have helped me again take notice and pleasure in simply observing the world around us, and taking the time to do so in a little more detail.

 

 

That is lovely to hear because that was the main reason I posted this topic. :)

Best Wishes.  

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This tree limb we had removed is healing very nicely. The limb was growing up over our garage and was making the whole tree heavy on that side. It had started leaning some toward the garage and I wanted to get it more balanced before a hurricane came through and pushed it over since it was already heavy on that side. The tree service estimated it took about 6 tons off that side of the tree because of how large and long it was.

HealingTreeLimb.jpg.9c16ebeeac4ec613d9529eceb0742846.jpg

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Just for fun, I asked an AI program to create me an image of a Painted Bunting bird. You'd have thought it would have been easy enough to just get a picture and present it to me. But evidently, since I used the word "create", it decided to give me something of it's own making.  While not accurate to our thinking, perhaps this is an AI version of how a Painted Bunting should look. Here are the results:

 

_9ba597d9-a7f5-49e8-9002-1c566febcfcd.jpg

_54e41fa4-faaa-4273-ba07-616d336b5c21.jpg

_a0bf4718-4879-4a1d-a98f-9890591572ef.jpg

_e9db6c3d-64ac-4b7a-83fe-fb564db2bd00.jpg

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7 hours ago, Sojo said:

Just for fun, I asked an AI program to create me an image of a Painted Bunting bird. You'd have thought it would have been easy enough to just get a picture and present it to me. But evidently, since I used the word "create", it decided to give me something of it's own making.  While not accurate to our thinking, perhaps this is an AI version of how a Painted Bunting should look. Here are the results:

 

_9ba597d9-a7f5-49e8-9002-1c566febcfcd.jpg

_54e41fa4-faaa-4273-ba07-616d336b5c21.jpg

_a0bf4718-4879-4a1d-a98f-9890591572ef.jpg

_e9db6c3d-64ac-4b7a-83fe-fb564db2bd00.jpg

That’s amazing!

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I wrote this six years ago. It’s one of my favorite memories of my adventures in the Utah desert:

Beautiful morning to wake up to:  32 degrees, a light breeze from the north,  a magnificent sunrise peeking over the treetops in the woods across the road.

This weather is perfect for jet contrails. When the jetstream is calm, and the temperature at high altitude is around -34 degrees, the contrails can last for hours. I live on the south-to-north and east-to-west air traffic routes, so as the number of contrails increase they make criss-cross patterns in the sky, forming precise geometrical patterns and triangles. I sit in my rocking chair and drink coffee and feel as though I’m watching an artist paint a picture on a canvas of blue sky.

Watching the airplanes sparks a memory. Shortly after moving to Salt Lake City in the mid-1970s, I awoke one morning, threw some gear in my backpack, drove six hours south to Arches National Park and headed off into the desert. 

Arches is a world so different from our everyday lives that you can’t help but feel as though you’re standing on Mars: towering red pinnacles riddled with sandstone arches; a desert floor of fine, red sand that imprints permanent red stains on your white tee-shirts and socks; and skies so clear and so deep-blue that you want to cry like that guy on YouTube who saw a double rainbow. 

The Viewing Area and some easy hiking trails are near the park entrance, but I wanted wilderness: I hiked deep into the 120 square miles of pristine desert that stretches to the faraway horizon. I followed the narrow trail that leads from the rocks to the flatlands, and then I kept on going: I hiked until just before sundown, and set up camp as the stars began to appear in a perfect dome of sky above me.

I didn’t have a tent, because it rarely rains in the desert, and mosquitoes are almost non-existent in the dry air. I found a flat area, moved a few rocks, and rolled out my sleeping bag. I sat down and ate some snack food, drank some water from my canteen, and then stretched out on  my sleeping bag. The fading sunlight had long ago disappeared, and now the starlight from a billion galaxies cast a pale, eerie glow across the desert. I felt tiny, like a speck of dust in a vast universe, all alone and surrounded by deep silence. It was a kind of beauty that I’d never experienced before. 

But then something unexpected happened. High above me, in the darkness between the stars, I saw the clearance lights of an airplane moving silently across the sky. I felt mesmerized, and my gaze became fixated on those faraway lights. 

I thought to myself, “Wow, there are people in that plane.” I pictured the dim lighting in the airplane cabin, flight attendants serving drinks, and smiling passengers chatting with one another. 

I began to realize where I was: alone in the wilderness, miles from civilization, far away from friends and family and strangers on the street, and waitresses in restaurants and the mailman who delivers the mail; and right then, like a bolt of lightning, I discovered a new emotion: I felt lonely. It wasn’t the loneliness that we feel in our normal everyday lives where we can pick up a phone and call a friend. This was an abyss of ‘aloneness’ that went deep into my soul.

I began to feel desperate. I wanted so badly to see another person that I rolled up my sleeping bag, threw everything into my backpack, and began hiking across the desert in the darkness. Whatever the cost, I was determined to talk to another person…. I would hike back to the parking lot, jump in my car, and find a convenience store or a late-night restaurant and talk to someone, anyone…

….but I couldn’t find the trail. In the darkness everything blended together, a jumble of sand and rocks. I walked back and forth, up into the rocks and back down, feeling panicked and alone.

I finally gave up. I went back into the desert, rolled out my sleeping bag, and drifted off to sleep. 

The sun arose in the morning, and I was okay again. The beauty of the desert and the warmth of the sun drives away the darkness on the inside as well as the outside. I took my time hiking out of the desert, stopping to take a few photos, and feeling happy to be surrounded by nature.

Now, 40 years later, I’m planning another trip to the desert, to the same spot, but this time for three days. I’ve learned a few things, and I know what to expect. And I think to myself, “What a wonderful world”.

image.jpeg.8b0f7e9d3909825fcca08ec6a63c0825.jpeg

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Awake at 4:00 AM, at the YMCA at 6:25, then a walk at the quarry lakes at 8:00. It was a beautiful morning - blue skies, light breeze, 39 degrees  (3.9C).

In the lower left corner of the top photo, you can see the handiwork of a motivated beaver who didn’t give much thought to how he was going to drag that big tree to his construction site.

image.jpeg.05e75fe16da966c5d47c82b0f7e58e60.jpeg
 

image.jpeg.8c8d109861faffacdb3267600f771ca2.jpeg

 

image.jpeg.95deaa71325092d2102bfc43556d3c91.jpeg

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2 hours ago, simplybill said:

Awake at 4:00 AM, at the YMCA at 6:25

I'm so sorry your wife kicked you out. What did you do to her? 

Sorry, just had to because that was what I read at first. 😄

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49 minutes ago, Michelle said:

I'm so sorry your wife kicked you out. What did you do to her? 

Sorry, just had to because that was what I read at first. 😄

That would be fine. It’s fun to stay at the YMCA!  🤠

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I look forward to seeing the  “Tree Shadow on the Corn Crib”  every December. 
This year I added a  “Bill’s Shadow on the Corn Crib”  perspective.  🤠
 

image.jpeg.d38c6467052dd9931a611f2445968986.jpeg

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Our loss is their gain. These herons love using the left over hurricane-ravaged dock supports as perches for their marsh life-styles. The single one stood like that as a statue the whole time I stood there. I figured he thought if he didn't move then I wouldn't be able to see him.

 

Heron Perches.jpg

Heron.jpg

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