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Strangely Massive Black Hole Discovered in Milky Way Satellite Galaxy


Manwon Lender
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Astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin’s McDonald Observatory have discovered an unusually massive black hole at the heart of one of the Milky Way’s dwarf satellite galaxies, called Leo I. Almost as massive as the black hole in our own galaxy, the finding could redefine our understanding of how all galaxies — the building blocks of the universe — evolve. The work is published in a recent issue of The Astrophysical Journal

The team decided to study Leo I because of its peculiarity. Unlike most dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, Leo I does not contain much dark matter. Researchers measured Leo I’s dark matter profile — that is, how the density of dark matter changes from the outer edges of the galaxy all the way into its center. They did this by measuring its gravitational pull on the stars: The faster the stars are moving, the more matter there is enclosed in their orbits. In particular, the team wanted to know whether dark matter density increases toward the galaxy’s center. They also wanted to know whether their profile measurement would match previous ones made using older telescope data combined with computer models.

Peer Reviewed Journal concerning the:  Dynamical Analysis of the Dark Matter and Central Black Hole Mass in the Dwarf Spheroidal Leo I: Dynamical Analysis of the Dark Matter and Central Black Hole Mass in the Dwarf Spheroidal Leo I - IOPscience

 
 
Edited by Manwon Lender
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Without reading the study (because it takes a great effort for me to read technical English, and it's late), one causal solution comes to mind.

Maybe the galaxy is a dwarf (and the black hole so massive), because the black hole has devoured most of it. Maybe Leo I is very very old.

 

Edited by zep73
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1 hour ago, zep73 said:

Without reading the study (because it takes a great effort for me to read technical English, and it's late), one causal solution comes to mind.

Maybe the galaxy is a dwarf (and the black hole so massive), because the black hole has devoured most of it. Maybe Leo I is very very old.

 

I never considered it that way, but I see pint and I think it's possible. I know thus a subject you enjoy reading aboit, as I find additional subjects Dark energy and matter I will mention you, unless you would request that I don't so this anyone. 

Peace

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10 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

I never considered it that way, but I see pint and I think it's possible. I know thus a subject you enjoy reading aboit, as I find additional subjects Dark energy and matter I will mention you, unless you would request that I don't so this anyone. 

Peace

Astronomy as a whole is not my favorite subject, but I am very interested in the mysteries, like the singularity and the big bang, relativity in action, gravity, dark matter and energy (more precisely: alternatives to the ΛCDM theory) and the properties of black holes. You could say I like some of the songs, but am not a fan of the band :lol:

Edited by zep73
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6 hours ago, zep73 said:

Astronomy as a whole is not my favorite subject, but I am very interested in the mysteries, like the singularity and the big bang, relativity in action, gravity, dark matter and energy (more precisely: alternatives to the ΛCDM theory) and the properties of black holes. You could say I like some of the songs, but am not a fan of the band :lol:

I know what you mean, the problem for me is that some many really cool subject you just can learn them all

Peace

 

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