Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Are people who believe in the afterlife more likely to react to a supernatural event?


Eldorado
 Share

Recommended Posts

Are people who believe in the afterlife more likely to react to a supernatural event — say, the sudden appearance of a ghostly apparition — than those who say they don’t?

Psychologist Jesse Bering and his colleagues at the University of Otago tested this very question, according to a recent study.

And in their attempts to unravel the connection between our beliefs in the afterlife and behavior regarding the supernatural, the scientists weren't afraid to take a spookily creative approach.

Discover Magazine

The “Ghost” in the Lab: Believers’ and Non-Believers’ Implicit Responses to an Alleged Apparition

TandFonline

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

unfortunately, a 'spookily creative' approach is a bit ambiguous. what does that actually mean?

as a skeptic, I perfectly accept that there are more things in heaven and Earth than we know. there are things that even I have experienced that wouldn't pass scientific scrutiny, so I know there are truly some mysteries out there; namely mysteries of how our brains work and how we interpret based on our own personal biases

i think it goes far beyond simplistic scientific hypotheses and what we claim to know about the human mind, how we react to certain life circumstances and how we may begin to process information a bit differently, especially after a tragic event; a mass casualty, death of loved ones, etc

or is it that we 'evolve' more important persons ourselves, especially loved ones, as higher than human? we can't possibly think that, for instance, your father died, someone very close to you, and you can't deal with the fact that they're...dead? it's a bad feeling, isn't it? that that's it, they live no longer and you've no longer any connection. humans being very social animals, atleast many of us, this is a very hard concept to grasp

the question is, does such an afterlife exist, or is it just an extension of our own egos? with due respect to the former, I'm going with the latter. that no one really gives a **** 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another experiment showed that atheists became just as physiologically distressed as believers when they dared God to do terrible things to their friends and family. And in a study on afterlife beliefs, extinctivists — people who believe that consciousness is completely snuffed out after death — would sometimes still ascribe psychological capacities to people who had died, such as them "knowing" that they were dead. 

 

This behavior has been my instinct all along where Atheists and Agnostics are concerned.  They boldly, unequivocally state that no God exists or that they believe the claims about a Creator are ridiculous yet in times of crisis they tend to seriously question their belief; not necessarily change their belief, but at least to seriously question it.  I assume the same thing occurs in many people of faith when events occur to them that do not seem to align with what their faith tells them.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's asking if people with a belief are more likely to succumb to that belief than someone without belief isn't it? 

The old atheist in the foxhole legend. I'm sure it happens but I doubt it's common.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are people who believe in ET more likely to react to a UAP occurrence, that is, have a positive or affirmative, belief reinforcing take on it?

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obviously since everything comes from their imagination. The brain is our greatest ally and our greatest flaw. Because he perceives according to the beliefs of each one. A religious fanatic will see signs of the supernatural everywhere, the person of science will see a possible and rational explanation. And then, in all cases, and I assume these words, the person of faith, for each even easily explainable, will give it a supernatural or even divinatory meaning when it is easily explained. And I remain convinced that many people of faith doubt their belief and are ready to organize false evidence just to convince themselves and others that it exists. Evidence ? All the videos and photos from the net.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[I'm working from the magazine version, since the paper is behind a paywall.]

Quote

In the target condition of the study, participants were casually told that a janitor had recently passed away in that room, and that "one of the PHD students swears they saw a ghost in the room."
...
This was in contrast to those in the control condition, who weren’t told anything about a recent death or ghost sighting in the room.

Is that a useful control? Were the controls told nothing unusual about the room?

People often come here to UM with stories, including ghost stories, and the skepttical reaction is (1) There are no such things as ghosts (or whatever) but (2) accepting that something unusual happened when and where reported. Often, there is real engagement to figure out what the something really was.

So, if these target skeptics in the study were like many of our skeptics here at UM, they were on notice that somethimg was unusual about the room. Sure enough, the lights failed, making dots to connect (among them, What else is wrong with this place? Didn't they say somebody died right here just the other day? Of what? Am I in danger? ...)

Perhaps the control group ought to have been told that the janitor quit recently after being asked to clean this room, and a PhD student swears that they smelled something like ozone in here.

Casually, of course.

Edited by eight bits
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, and then said:

This behavior has been my instinct all along where Atheists and Agnostics are concerned.  They boldly, unequivocally state that no God exists or that they believe the claims about a Creator are ridiculous yet in times of crisis they tend to seriously question their belief; not necessarily change their belief, but at least to seriously question it. 

Undoubtedly some do.  I think the more common experience though is that for certain times of crisis non-believers get an appreciation for the comfort that some religious beliefs can bring and the appeal. Most I think though usually recognize that this still doesn't have anything to do with truth of it.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.