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Giant dying star explodes as scientists watch in real time — a first for astronomy


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

The death of a star is one of the most dramatic and violent events in space — and astronomers had an unprecedented front-row seat to the explosive end of a stellar giant.

Ground-based telescopes provided the first real-time look at the death throes of a red supergiant star. While these aren’t the brightest or most massive stars, they are the largest in terms of volume.

One popular red supergiant star is Betelgeuse, which has captured interest due to its irregular dimming. While it was predicted that Betelgeuse may go supernova, it’s still around.

However, the star at the heart of this new research, located in the NGC 5731 galaxy about 120 million light-years away from Earth, was 10 times more massive than the sun before it exploded.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/giant-dying-star-explodes-as-scientists-watch-in-real-time-a-first-for-astronomy-1.5730438

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ac3f3a

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1 hour ago, Jon the frog said:

WIll it be visible by telescope ?

In theory a big amateur scope could see it but in practice it would be a difficult optical target. A scope with camera (long exposure) would see it, once located. 

Its in the constellation Boötes and the host galaxy (NGC 5731) is brightness Mag 14. 

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1 hour ago, jethrofloyd said:
Will the black hole form later, after a explosion ?

It did not look big enough (10-12 solar mass) to form a black hole ?

Other option is a neutron star. 

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19 minutes ago, L.A.T.1961 said:

In theory a big amateur scope could see it but in practice it would be a difficult optical target. A scope with camera (long exposure) would see it, once located. 

Its in the constellation Boötes and the host galaxy (NGC 5731) is brightness Mag 14. 

So i'm waiting for pictures ! Will find some for sure !

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Astronomers have for the first time imaged the last moments in the life of a red supergiant star.

Red supergiant was watched for 130 days before it collapsed - and scientists recreated the supernova.

https://news.sky.com/story/astronomers-spot-dying-star-just-before-it-explodes-and-record-supernova-12510823

0:25 video

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I don't quite understand since what has been seen now has probably happened thousands if not million of years ago. How can they observe the sun intact, then years later it's gone in an explosion unless what they saw, already happened long time ago and they were just lucky to capture its long dead projection.
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7 hours ago, Phil1684 said:

  This is old news. It happened 120 million years ago. 

No, for those who, like us, observed it for the first time it is news, despite it must have happened many millions of years ago.

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On 1/9/2022 at 4:21 AM, qxcontinuum said:

 unless what they saw, already happened long time ago and they were just lucky to capture its long dead projection.

Exactly. :tu: 

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For the first time ever, astronomers have imaged in real time the dramatic end to a red supergiant's life -- watching the massive star's rapid self-destruction and final death throes before collapsing into a type II supernova. Led by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), the team observed the red supergiant during its last 130 days leading up to its deadly detonation.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220106143653.htm

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