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UK NHS will start sacking unvaccinated staff from next month


Eldorado
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The NHS will start sacking employees who have not been jabbed in just over two weeks, new guidance shows.

All frontline NHS staff must have had two vaccines by April 1, meaning the first dose must have been administered by Feb 3.

Healthcare employers have been told that from the following day – February 4 – unvaccinated staff should be invited to a meeting and told that a potential outcome may be dismissal.

More than 80,000, six per cent of the workforce, remain unvaccinated despite persistent efforts from the Government to increase take-up.

https://www.gbnews.uk/news/nhs-will-start-sacking-unvaccinated-staff-from-next-month/207631

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1 hour ago, Eldorado said:

The NHS will start sacking employees who have not been jabbed in just over two weeks, new guidance shows.

All frontline NHS staff must have had two vaccines by April 1, meaning the first dose must have been administered by Feb 3.

Healthcare employers have been told that from the following day – February 4 – unvaccinated staff should be invited to a meeting and told that a potential outcome may be dismissal.

More than 80,000, six per cent of the workforce, remain unvaccinated despite persistent efforts from the Government to increase take-up.

https://www.gbnews.uk/news/nhs-will-start-sacking-unvaccinated-staff-from-next-month/207631

As I said in my oops double post but...I'm intrigued by this. How come there are potentially 80,000 professional health workers (basically people that are telling everyone else to get vaccinated) that would rather lose their livelihood than have the jab?

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1 hour ago, Eldorado said:

Healthcare employers have been told that from the following day – February 4 – unvaccinated staff should be invited to a meeting and told that a potential outcome MAY be dismissal.

 

And if they're not dismissed, what is the alternative proposal for them?

11 minutes ago, itsnotoutthere said:

As I said in my oops double post but...I'm intrigued by this. How come there are potentially 80,000 professional health workers (basically people that are telling everyone else to get vaccinated) that would rather lose their livelihood than have the jab?

This puzzles me too. What do they know, or at least have a hunch about, that we don't?

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6 minutes ago, ouija ouija said:

And if they're not dismissed, what is the alternative proposal for them?

This puzzles me too. What do they know, or at least have a hunch about, that we don't?

It does rather beg the question doesn't it. To go through all that training & hard work & then give it all up for the sake of a couple of jabs that you're encouraging everyone else to take seems rather odd to say the least.

Edited by itsnotoutthere
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28 minutes ago, itsnotoutthere said:

As I said in my oops double post but...I'm intrigued by this. How come there are potentially 80,000 professional health workers (basically people that are telling everyone else to get vaccinated) that would rather lose their livelihood than have the jab?

You should be asking why 94 percent of them DO get it...

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4 minutes ago, Autochthon1990 said:

You should be asking why 94 percent of them DO get it...

That doesn't really answer the question regarding the 80,000 though does it.

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This is completely anecdotal and cannot be verified so take what you will from it.

I know four people who work in Accident and Emergency at UK hospitals.

I know two who work in ICU.

All of them said how quiet they've been during covid.

One of them (A&E admittedly) said how embarrassed she was by the clapping as she was sat on her hands most shifts doing nothing while the ICU in her hospital had 1 patient and they didn't have covid. The highest number they had with covid at any time in approx 2 years was 3. Large city hospital.

She had anecdotal evidence that every patient treated at her hospital and the neighbouring city centre hospital had other conditions. Not one had "just covid". She also knows one member of the ICU team, where they actually had covid patients, who is unjabbed. And she didn't even catch covid.

Most staff know it is nowhere near as bad as the media made out if you're healthy.

So they don't see why they should get jabbed when there are risks with the jab.

The A&E department where my friend worked has treated at least 4 people with complications from the jab.

They are health conscious people. Two of them are triathletes. They didn't want jabs but they need the money. 

It sucks. Big time.

Also anecdotally, Boris Johnson and his staff with all the info to hand on just how lethal covid was, still went head and partied through the pandemic. They also know that covid is a relative minnow of a virus. Since Boris caught covid, what has he done? Made moves to get his weight down (eg: swimming at the G8 summit in Cornwall). It was pretty much his only risk factor, which is why he pulled through and is alos why he is mitigating that risk.

So, those in the know are feeling quite safe from covid but also wary of complications from a jab when they've done all they can to be healthy.

So, why then would anyone willingly take the jab?

 

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The article doesn’t specify in what capacity those workers are members of the NHS are working at. They could be anything from laundry to clerical so whet what do they know question is not really valid if they have no medical background. They may know nothing and have not taken the vac for the same personal reasons that anyone else who doesn’t know anything does.

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34 minutes ago, OpenMindedSceptic said:

This is completely anecdotal and cannot be verified so take what you will from it.

I know four people who work in Accident and Emergency at UK hospitals.

I know two who work in ICU.

All of them said how quiet they've been during covid.

One of them (A&E admittedly) said how embarrassed she was by the clapping as she was sat on her hands most shifts doing nothing while the ICU in her hospital had 1 patient and they didn't have covid. The highest number they had with covid at any time in approx 2 years was 3. Large city hospital.

She had anecdotal evidence that every patient treated at her hospital and the neighbouring city centre hospital had other conditions. Not one had "just covid". She also knows one member of the ICU team, where they actually had covid patients, who is unjabbed. And she didn't even catch covid.

Most staff know it is nowhere near as bad as the media made out if you're healthy.

So they don't see why they should get jabbed when there are risks with the jab.

The A&E department where my friend worked has treated at least 4 people with complications from the jab.

They are health conscious people. Two of them are triathletes. They didn't want jabs but they need the money. 

It sucks. Big time.

Also anecdotally, Boris Johnson and his staff with all the info to hand on just how lethal covid was, still went head and partied through the pandemic. They also know that covid is a relative minnow of a virus. Since Boris caught covid, what has he done? Made moves to get his weight down (eg: swimming at the G8 summit in Cornwall). It was pretty much his only risk factor, which is why he pulled through and is alos why he is mitigating that risk.

So, those in the know are feeling quite safe from covid but also wary of complications from a jab when they've done all they can to be healthy.

So, why then would anyone willingly take the jab?

 

Well, would go some way in explaining why the Nightingale hospitals were hardly used.

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/nightingale-hospitals-covid-patient-numbers_uk_605a0dd6c5b6cebf58d220eb#:~:text= How were the Nightingale hospitals used%3F ,The Nightingale Yorkshire in Harrogate ha... More

The Nightingale London, at the ExCeL centre, admitted 54 inpatients from April 8 to May 6, before effectively halting Covid-19 treatment.

Another 110 were admitted to the Nightingale North West in Manchester from April to June last year, while the Nightingale Exeter had treated 108 inpatients as of January 12.

The four other Nightingales – in Birmingham, Sunderland, Bristol and Yorkshire – have never been used for any Covid inpatient care despite thousands of beds being available for this purpose.

We can also reveal that one hospital – the Nightingale Birmingham, which was the most expensive to set-up at a contracted budget of £109million – has never been used at all.

Edited by itsnotoutthere
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1 hour ago, ouija ouija said:

And if they're not dismissed, what is the alternative proposal for them?

They can be moved to non-patient facing roles if suitable instead.

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4 hours ago, itsnotoutthere said:

As I said in my oops double post but...I'm intrigued by this. How come there are potentially 80,000 professional health workers (basically people that are telling everyone else to get vaccinated) that would rather lose their livelihood than have the jab?

They’re ****ing idiots. Pretty simple, really.

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4 hours ago, itsnotoutthere said:

That doesn't really answer the question regarding the 80,000 though does it.

Oh, my apologies.

 

They're idiots. 

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This policy could be reversed just as quickly as it was suggested and I think when the time comes it will be watered down or scraped.

By then the threat of job loss to increase staff vaccination numbers will be apparent. 

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Commenting on the latest guidance, Unison’s head of health, Sara Gorton, flagged concerns about the impact on existing staff shortages that could be made worse by the new vaccination rules and called for the move to be delayed.

“This is a headache the NHS simply doesn’t need,” she said.

“Trusts already short on staff will have no option but to comply with the law.

“Managers will have to let experienced people go, putting the running of safe services in jeopardy.”

https://www.nursingtimes.net/news/workforce/redeployment-and-dismissal-processes-outlined-in-mandatory-jab-guidance-17-01-2022/

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