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New study casts doubt on Loch Ness Monster plesiosaur theory


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I thought this idea was tossed in the waste bin decades back.

If and thats a huge qualifying if there is anything weird in the loch its likely a wells catfish released in there for i believe sport fishing years back.

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"Nessie" is a huge, mis-shapen potato. :yes:

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31 minutes ago, UM-Bot said:

The famous Scottish loch monster is often said to be a plesiosaur - but just how plausible is that?

 

It's always been about as plausible as my house having been built 2 million years ago by the Ancient Egyptians  ;) 

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25 minutes ago, the13bats said:

I thought this idea was tossed in the waste bin decades back.

If and thats a huge qualifying if there is anything weird in the loch its likely a wells catfish released in there for i believe sport fishing years back.

As I have always said, the LNM is simply anything anyone sees in the loch that they cannot personally identify.  Most commonly waves, branches, and various animals - which may well include catfish and eunuch eels.

And if anything managed to enter the loch from the ocean, it would have to be something that currently exists in the oceans.  Bearing in mind that for much of the past 2 million years the loch was a glacier.

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"casts doubt"?

How can you cast doubt on something that's complete rubbish to begin with?

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LMAO, everything we know 'casts doubt' on the whole plesiosaur idea.

I like the eel(s). idea, myself. They've found tons of eel DNA in the loch, they know some eels live in it and they know that they can grow pretty large.
There's also the fact that Nessie amazing for tourism money in the whole region.
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You're all missing the point here.  The good doctor is pointing out that Nessie was a plesiosaur a billion years ago but has clearly since evolved.  Aint you never heard of Darwin?  Animals wot are millions of years old have to change and evolve into new animals.  So the Loch Ness Monster is now an eel or a giraffe or whatever you says it is, but it wasn't always so boring.

btw "Dr Paul Scofield Canterbury" is an anagram of "a foul despicable dry currant" and therefore should not be trusted on anything.

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Quote

New study casts doubt on Loch Ness Monster plesiosaur theory

You don't say . . . 

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A veterinary student Arthur Grant driving a motorcycle almost collided with a dark object coming across the road 1933. In the bright moonlight Grant was able to notice the animals small head, long neck, large body, flippers and tail. Frightened by the motorbike animal quickly fled back into the Loch.

File:Arthur Grant loch ness sketch.png - Wikimedia Commons

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Well no duh!

If Nessie was a plesiosaur, we'd be seeing the creature(s) surfacing more often then not for air.

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errrrrrrrrr, what do scientists know. silly rabbits :geek:

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56 minutes ago, Earl.Of.Trumps said:

errrrrrrrrr, what do scientists know. silly rabbits :geek:

Our former president agrees!

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But, but, but....there's stories and pictures!!!! It has to be real!!!!

Edited by Trelane
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I've been on Loch Ness I'm a boat with Captain Edwards. Spoken with him for a long chat about Nessie. Who knows if it's real or what it is.

What I did find interesting is that he said the head of the beast never breaks out of the water. He has quite a few pics, a few sonar tracking recordings and many a story, both the fake and the others not so easy to dismiss.

It isn't a plesiosaur though, whatever it is.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/20/2022 at 11:57 AM, jethrofloyd said:

A veterinary student Arthur Grant driving a motorcycle almost collided with a dark object coming across the road 1933. In the bright moonlight Grant was able to notice the animals small head, long neck, large body, flippers and tail. Frightened by the motorbike animal quickly fled back into the Loch.

File:Arthur Grant loch ness sketch.png - Wikimedia Commons

Could have been a large turtle,

Years back we were driving not too into the country but this is florida, i see up the road what i first thought was a lemur on all 4s hurrying across the road, had that been all i saw i would have said im not sure but looked like some type monkey, tina agreed,

However, when we get closer it was a small alligator a ******* pulled over and grabbed it and helped it back to the water,

Eyes and brains play tricks when we only catch a glimpse of something if a person at the loch wants to see nessie they likely will.

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Originally Nessie walked on land on 4 legs. Now it is an aquatic animal. It's shape changes with time.

The only reason Nessie is even famous is that the British news service decided it was better to report on a hometown monster than on the Lake Champlain monster which had been the most famous monster in the world.

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6 hours ago, the13bats said:

Could have been a large turtle,

You haven't visited, the Loch or Scotland have you? 

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R.I.P. Nessie/Champ myth.

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  • 3 weeks later...

If anyone has read Constance Whyte's book 'More than a Legend'.  There's food for thought in that.  I first went to Loch Ness as a child in the 1980s, it's amazing how much it's changed since then. The number of tourists have increased ten fold.  And back to the sightings of the 1930s-1950s was another world again, a world now gone. :)  

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1 hour ago, lismore said:

If anyone has read Constance Whyte's book 'More than a Legend'.  There's food for thought in that.  I first went to Loch Ness as a child in the 1980s, it's amazing how much it's changed since then. The number of tourists have increased ten fold.  And back to the sightings of the 1930s-1950s was another world again, a world now gone. :)  

Well what about the earlier reports in which Nessie has legs and walks on land?

 

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I think Nessie is a giant eel.  I remember reading this pile of 19th Century Gentlemen's fishing magazines in a library in Bristol that covered how big eels get, and some were immense.   I live in terror that the library turfed the magazines out or retired them, because when I went back 15 years later, they were all gone.  The magazine put forward the hypothesis that the "wyrms" of Arthurian and Medieval legend were in fact land-going giant eels, and given the size of the "prodigies" discussed, they were more than capable of taking a sheep or a child. I have looked everywhere to find copies of the magazine since, but my memory of what it was called has faded.  Does anyone have any idea what I am talking about? 

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9 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

I think Nessie is a giant eel.  I remember reading this pile of 19th Century Gentlemen's fishing magazines in a library in Bristol that covered how big eels get, and some were immense.   I live in terror that the library turfed the magazines out or retired them, because when I went back 15 years later, they were all gone.  The magazine put forward the hypothesis that the "wyrms" of Arthurian and Medieval legend were in fact land-going giant eels, and given the size of the "prodigies" discussed, they were more than capable of taking a sheep or a child. I have looked everywhere to find copies of the magazine since, but my memory of what it was called has faded.  Does anyone have any idea what I am talking about? 

There is the notion that there are giants eels in the ocean because a large juvenile eel was once caught. It was extrapolated that this eel would be very large. Later specimens of the adult were caught and they were not large. The idea of gigantic eels has by and large been dropped in science, but not in crypto circles.

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22 hours ago, stereologist said:

Well what about the earlier reports in which Nessie has legs and walks on land?

 

Yes that's what I mean.  A different world back then :)  

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