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Thích Nhất Hạnh, Zen master who preached compassion and nonviolence, dies


Manwon Lender
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Thích Nhất Hạnh, the Zen monk and long-time Vietnamese political exile who was a prominent global Buddhist spiritual leader renowned for his advocacy of individual responsibility for such worldly concerns as the environment and nonviolence, has died. Called Thay, “teacher,” by his followers, he died Saturday (Jan. 22, Vietnam time) in his room, at his temple. He was 95. His death was announced by Plum Village, his organization of monasteries. He spent 39 years in exile from Vietnam because of his pro-peace advocacy that put him in conflict with the policies of both the Vietnam War’s North and South Vietnam governments. He also criticized United States involvement in the war.

Trained in the Vietnamese Thien (Zen) tradition, Thích Nhất Hạnh’s approach to Buddhism was eclectic. He combined several Mahayana, or north Indian-Tibetan schools of Buddhist thought, with elements of Western psychology. However, he was perhaps best known as a contemporary advocate of the now-widespread activist movement he named Engaged Buddhism. Engaged Buddhism, by contrast, seeks to apply meditative insights and other teachings about how to act toward others and the world in ways that reduce social, political, environmental and economic suffering.

For example, a traditional Southeast Asian Buddhist might be inclined to donate money for construction of a village temple to house monks and for ritual functions to gain personal merit. Engaged Buddhism instead might favor contributing to a soup kitchen to feed a hungry general population. For many contemporary Westerners disenchanted with their birth religions but still steeped in the Abrahamic faiths’ association of “justice” with the social good, Engaged Buddhism was a natural psychological and political fit, lifting its popularity.

On his 80th birthday, Thích Nhất Hạnh was asked if he might ever retire. He replied: “Teaching is not done by talking alone. It is done by how you live your life. My life is my teaching. My life is my message.

https://religionnews.com/2022/01/21/thich-nhat-hanh-zen-master-who-preached-compassion-and-nonviolence-dies/

NAMASTE MASTER:( 

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Edited by Manwon Lender
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33 minutes ago, Only_ said:

True Spiritual Master.

RIP

Thanks for your post and your heart felt sentiments, but based upon Buddhas teaching, a Buddhist only Rest In Peace when they have purified their Karma and reached Nirvana only then will reincarnation end! Until this has manifest all Buddhists will continue to suffer the pain and suffering that comes with reincarnation!

Namaste!:tu:

@Sherapy did want you to miss this thread!

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16 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

Thanks for your post and your heart felt sentiments, but based upon Buddhas teaching, a Buddhist only Rest In Peace when they have purified their Karma and reached Nirvana only then will reincarnation end! Until this has manifest all Buddhists will continue to suffer the pain and suffering that comes with reincarnation!

Namaste!:tu:

@Sherapy did want you to miss this thread!

I woke up to this sad news today. Thank you for starting this thread. 
 

He was such a great voice; he was the real deal. I am sad today. 
 

What an example :nw:

Edited by Sherapy
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39 minutes ago, Sherapy said:

I woke up to this sad news today. Thank you for starting this thread. 
 

He was such a great voice; he was the real deal. I am sad today. 
 

What an example :nw:

I certainly agree and he held to his principles and his spirituality until the end. Hopefully he has purified his karm so he has reached enlighted state and Nirvana!!:tu:

Peace Sheri!!:tu:

Edited by Manwon Lender
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It is sad that the world has lost two towering figures of peace and love in a span of two months, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Thich Nhat Hanh.

Even though I have never met them personally, the expressions of sweetness, peace and loving benevolence in these men gives me the feeling that I have lost two affectionate elders or friendly uncles, unaffected by the worldly currents of materialism that drives lesser people to relentlessly grasp for transient pleasures.

 I found this saying by the Dalai Lama on Thich Nhat Hanh insightful and inspiring...

'[Thich Nhat Hanh] shows us the connection between personal inner peace and peace on earth. '


 

Edited by Ajay0
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A beautiful man, and a life well spent mapping-out the way to inner peace.

And not only sharing that knowledge and wisdom, but exemplifying ones pure, human nature of  love, compassion, understanding and loving kindness.

And so I refuse to feel sad, for there is only reason for celebration, for such a one as this.

I was fortunate enough to hear Thich speak at the Hammersmith Apollo in west London back in the 00s. And in particular a musical choir and a beautiful, old, Vietnamese nun, who sang, and touched everyone's heart that evening.

Not gone, not forgotten, just passing on through as we all are.

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  • 1 month later...

Wow..that is kinda weird 'cuz I just bought one of his books yesterday (thursday) on impulse and wondering if he was still living. I am no buddhist but I like reading some of his writings.

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7 hours ago, Bendy Demon said:

Wow..that is kinda weird 'cuz I just bought one of his books yesterday (thursday) on impulse and wondering if he was still living. I am no buddhist but I like reading some of his writings.

Which book did you buy?

I read, Old Path White Cloud, years ago, and came to realise that to love in the platonic sense takes understanding, compassion, and kindness.

To take the time to understand an issue, problem, situation, to feel for that being, and to actually help.

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@Manwon Lender

My oldest sister was a personal student and if you check out the picture of Little Ninja and I in Rouges Gallery there is his picture, one of his calligraphies and a bodhi leaf he gave her behind us.

A truly great man!

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On 3/5/2022 at 1:02 AM, Crazy Horse said:

Which book did you buy?

I read, Old Path White Cloud, years ago, and came to realise that to love in the platonic sense takes understanding, compassion, and kindness.

To take the time to understand an issue, problem, situation, to feel for that being, and to actually help.

Oops..sorry for the late reply.

I bought: The Pocket Thich Nhat Hanh

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1 hour ago, Bendy Demon said:

Oops..sorry for the late reply.

I bought: The Pocket Thich Nhat Hanh

Hay, perhaps after you have read it, you might like to share something you got from the book?

I would be interested to hear your insights..

Enjoy.

 

 

 

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31 minutes ago, Crazy Horse said:

Hay, perhaps after you have read it, you might like to share something you got from the book?

I would be interested to hear your insights..

Enjoy.

There is a lot that can be gleaned, for sure and what I appreciate about this book is how it condenses and covers salient points without rambling and preaching.

That said, one of the 'chapters' was called "The Businessless Person' and I enjoyed it as Thich described how, as a society, we are always running after something in the hopes that it will give us answers..basically telling us what to do. There is an excerpt that I found very useful and many people would do well to read it and in essence it says that insight can't be found in sutras, commentaries and so forth. They can be helpful but in the end you need to go by your own words and not someone elses. Not devotions or meticulously studying scriptures but by awareness and mindful living.

I think people might get a rather skewed concept of 'mindfulness' thinking that perhaps it is this fluffy mindset where you are stumbling around with a simpering grin and thinking only one thought at a time; what it means is really adopting a mindset and to keep reminding yourself of what you are doing and why.

Let's see if I can clarify a bit..when I get up I make breakfast for my stepmother..now it is usually a reaction to think it is a drudgery and a bother, thinking "Oh geez, look at all this stuff I have to do" (and I find myself doing that on occasion) so I am learning to become aware of what my reaction and remind myself what I am doing and why. I am doing it for a family member and I make an effort to find little things of the process that I like such as getting out my cast iron pan (I love using cast iron) and heating it just enough to cook the omelette and mixing the egg mixture and so on. I know it sounds cliche but I am learning to focus on the task and allow myself to entertain happier thoughts as I work and then I discover it is not so bad after all.

I need to remind myself that I am doing this not just for my step mother but for my father too as a way to help him; doing things so he can devote more time to caring for his wife.

In essence it is a mindset..I can enjoy things without worrying about the how and why..(sorry, my mind jumps around a bit) I can extract whatever I find useful from various philosophies without feeling the need to become an adherent to them or using labels (which is another little chapter too).

Anyways..in regards to the 'businessless' person one realizes that insight  does not come from rituals, ceremonies, mantras, sutras, scripture...it must, in the end, be formulated from within because if you don't form and live by your own words you will be doomed to being a slave to someone else's words.

(Sigh..mind rambling again..)

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9 hours ago, Bendy Demon said:

There is a lot that can be gleaned, for sure and what I appreciate about this book is how it condenses and covers salient points without rambling and preaching.

That said, one of the 'chapters' was called "The Businessless Person' and I enjoyed it as Thich described how, as a society, we are always running after something in the hopes that it will give us answers..basically telling us what to do. There is an excerpt that I found very useful and many people would do well to read it and in essence it says that insight can't be found in sutras, commentaries and so forth. They can be helpful but in the end you need to go by your own words and not someone elses. Not devotions or meticulously studying scriptures but by awareness and mindful living.

I think people might get a rather skewed concept of 'mindfulness' thinking that perhaps it is this fluffy mindset where you are stumbling around with a simpering grin and thinking only one thought at a time; what it means is really adopting a mindset and to keep reminding yourself of what you are doing and why.

Let's see if I can clarify a bit..when I get up I make breakfast for my stepmother..now it is usually a reaction to think it is a drudgery and a bother, thinking "Oh geez, look at all this stuff I have to do" (and I find myself doing that on occasion) so I am learning to become aware of what my reaction and remind myself what I am doing and why. I am doing it for a family member and I make an effort to find little things of the process that I like such as getting out my cast iron pan (I love using cast iron) and heating it just enough to cook the omelette and mixing the egg mixture and so on. I know it sounds cliche but I am learning to focus on the task and allow myself to entertain happier thoughts as I work and then I discover it is not so bad after all.

I need to remind myself that I am doing this not just for my step mother but for my father too as a way to help him; doing things so he can devote more time to caring for his wife.

In essence it is a mindset..I can enjoy things without worrying about the how and why..(sorry, my mind jumps around a bit) I can extract whatever I find useful from various philosophies without feeling the need to become an adherent to them or using labels (which is another little chapter too).

Anyways..in regards to the 'businessless' person one realizes that insight  does not come from rituals, ceremonies, mantras, sutras, scripture...it must, in the end, be formulated from within because if you don't form and live by your own words you will be doomed to being a slave to someone else's words.

(Sigh..mind rambling again..)

Ramble all you want mate, no bother..

I think that rituals, ceremonies etc are good to focus ones mind, as a preparation for living mindfully, but as Thich said, wisdom comes from within. As Christ said something similar.

As for your chores, we all do things that we would rather skip, but, as you say, its the state of mind, positive or negative that really count. I truly believe that anyone may live a life of a bodhisattva, yogi, saint, within an everyday life, if one dedicates their spare time to things such as meditation, karma yoga, etc..

These things take time, but in todays world, progress can be rapid.

Just to add, there is an old saying that, when the mind is ready, (ripe) the teacher shall appear.

And that that teacher shall be integral to ones awakening.

 

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1 hour ago, Crazy Horse said:

Ramble all you want mate, no bother..

I think that rituals, ceremonies etc are good to focus ones mind, as a preparation for living mindfully, but as Thich said, wisdom comes from within. As Christ said something similar.

As for your chores, we all do things that we would rather skip, but, as you say, its the state of mind, positive or negative that really count. I truly believe that anyone may live a life of a bodhisattva, yogi, saint, within an everyday life, if one dedicates their spare time to things such as meditation, karma yoga, etc..

These things take time, but in todays world, progress can be rapid.

Just to add, there is an old saying that, when the mind is ready, (ripe) the teacher shall appear.

And that that teacher shall be integral to ones awakening.

 

Focusing tools are good as long as you understand they are just tools and are not sacred themselves. But never let them become a crutch and try to grow beyond them.

Then there is negative focusing tools such as chain smoking, intoxicants or binge eating.

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58 minutes ago, Piney said:

Focusing tools are good as long as you understand they are just tools and are not sacred themselves. But never let them become a crutch and try to grow beyond them.

Then there is negative focusing tools such as chain smoking, intoxicants or binge eating.

All dogma leaves me cold tbh.

I've come to actually realise, quite recently, how an inner peace is absolutely essential for all spiritual practice. 

Essential and fundamental. The rock solid foundation on which to build ones life upon.

Inner peace means no desire or fear, just a spontaneous response to whatever life throws your way, good, bad, or indifferent.

It is the core of ones freedom, happiness, joy and bliss.

Peace.

 

 

 

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To continue the thought..

Peace and ones peacefulness is the ground from which love and gratitude may blossom into unexpected beauty and creativity.

Inner peace is the non-attachment of Buddhism, and yet, creates the space for compassion to arise naturally.

Inner peace creates outer harmony, and a clear and practical way forward.

Good health, good relationships, and all that's worth living for, stem from ones ability to remain at peace with the world.

Here's a poem I wrote years ago.

"May peace bless the earth

Now love feels every heart

Happiness reigns supreme

In the Liberated mind."

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9 hours ago, Crazy Horse said:

To continue the thought..

Peace and ones peacefulness is the ground from which love and gratitude may blossom into unexpected beauty and creativity.

Inner peace is the non-attachment of Buddhism, and yet, creates the space for compassion to arise naturally.

Inner peace creates outer harmony, and a clear and practical way forward.

Good health, good relationships, and all that's worth living for, stem from ones ability to remain at peace with the world.

Here's a poem I wrote years ago.

"May peace bless the earth

Now love feels every heart

Happiness reigns supreme

In the Liberated mind."

Hi Crazy Horse

Maybe recite that poem to yourself before posting in the Ukrainians threads your godliness does not show there.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Crazy Horse

Maybe recite that poem to yourself before posting in the Ukrainians threads your godliness does not show there.

Amen, Jay.:P All talk no walk comes to mind. 

Edited by Sherapy
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On 3/8/2022 at 2:15 AM, Piney said:

Focusing tools are good as long as you understand they are just tools and are not sacred themselves. But never let them become a crutch and try to grow beyond them.

Then there is negative focusing tools such as chain smoking, intoxicants or binge eating.

:nw: Word.

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16 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Crazy Horse

Maybe recite that poem to yourself before posting in the Ukrainians threads your godliness does not show there.

Really?

All that I said, highlighted, was the insane amounts of hypocrisy coming from the West and NATO.

And what is it with you and psyche101, its like you are a tag-team, (or something).

 

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3 hours ago, Crazy Horse said:

Really?

All that I said, highlighted, was the insane amounts of hypocrisy coming from the West and NATO.

And what is it with you and psyche101, its like you are a tag-team, (or something).

 

Hi Crazy Horse

Yes really, you may not notice your tone at times but there was no love in your words, you and I are just a couple of sinners like the rest of the world and no I am not tag teaming on you just stating an observation.:tu:

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And so, to continue this "peace process".

Like I said before, it is only recently that I have actually realised the importance of this inner peace.. 

Realise, meaning a deep knowing, understanding, experiencing, and becoming one with "peace", in this example.

But this foundation has allowed an even greater openness of both mind, and ones heart, which has already added a lot of value. So in other words, my spiritual insights and practice have really taken off..

And just yesterday, a huge, welcome, insight/practice came my way. 

The practice of remembering SELF.

Just flicking ones attention, to remembering, ones higher SELF, is enough to stop all thoughts, abiding in the present moment, and feeling THAT Presence too.

If you have just one practice, then really, this is the most simplistic, easiest, and affective thing one can do, for oneself.

And although this is super powerful within the context of a formal meditation, it can actually be used at any time, place, or circumstance.

Walking, yep, I can remember SELF, talking, sure, I can remember SELF, working, writing, and on, and on...

If I have any more insights I should be happy to share, but, this is so simple, and affective, and powerful, and sublime, that I am not sure where one goes after this?

Probs straight to Nirvana.

Ha.

Ha.

PS. if one is formally meditating, then a little tip. Remain absolutely still, like a statue.

And you will feel GOD.

 

 

 

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On 3/11/2022 at 2:43 PM, Crazy Horse said:

And so, to continue this "peace process".

Like I said before, it is only recently that I have actually realised the importance of this inner peace.. 

Realise, meaning a deep knowing, understanding, experiencing, and becoming one with "peace", in this example.

But this foundation has allowed an even greater openness of both mind, and ones heart, which has already added a lot of value. So in other words, my spiritual insights and practice have really taken off..

And just yesterday, a huge, welcome, insight/practice came my way. 

The practice of remembering SELF.

Just flicking ones attention, to remembering, ones higher SELF, is enough to stop all thoughts, abiding in the present moment, and feeling THAT Presence too.

If you have just one practice, then really, this is the most simplistic, easiest, and affective thing one can do, for oneself.

And although this is super powerful within the context of a formal meditation, it can actually be used at any time, place, or circumstance.

Walking, yep, I can remember SELF, talking, sure, I can remember SELF, working, writing, and on, and on...

If I have any more insights I should be happy to share, but, this is so simple, and affective, and powerful, and sublime, that I am not sure where one goes after this?

Probs straight to Nirvana.

Ha.

Ha.

PS. if one is formally meditating, then a little tip. Remain absolutely still, like a statue.

And you will feel GOD.

 

 

 

And so there is always more, until there isn't.

And so, its not enough to simply flick ones awareness to SELF, aka GOD, and dwell upon THAT, no...

One has to allow ones heart to naturally fill with love, for THAT, until a total surrender of ones ego self is given, as a gift, you your Beloved.

And merge, and transcend, with THAT.

 

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Batter up... 

Quote
8 Mar 2017  "Master, please, put it to rest." Bodhidharma said, "Bring me your mind, and I will put it to rest." Huike said, "I have searched for my ...
 
~
 
 
10 Nov 2018  Here is a simplified form of our koan: Huike (pron. "Hway-Kuh), a promising Chinese disciple, begged Bodhidharma to help him find...
 
~
 
 
Huike said to Bodhidharma, "My mind is anxious. Please pacify it." Bodhidharma replied, "Bring me your mind, and I will pacify it."
 
~
 

...

You can't bring it but you can definitely lose it... 

~

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