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Old man of the lake


Myles
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On my travels, I have seen lots of neat places and things but I have not been to Crater lake to see this.  

 

The Old Man of the Lake is a 30-foot tall tree stump, most likely a hemlock, that has been bobbing vertically in Oregon's Crater Lake since at least 1896. The stump is about 2 feet in diameter at the waterline and stands approximately 4 feet above the water. Its surface has been bleached white due to photodegradation.

The old man’s age is carbon dated beyond 450 years old. It was first sighted and tracked in 1896 by lake geologist, Joseph Diller.

The curiosity surrounding the Old Man continued to grow and, in 1938, Washington D.C commissioned a study of its travels. Between July and October, the Old Man traveled 62.1 miles, an average of .67 miles/day with his maximum daily distance of 3.8 miles achieved on August 6th.

 

https://www.nps.gov/crla/learn/nature/theoldman.htm

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18 minutes ago, Myles said:

On my travels, I have seen lots of neat places and things but I have not been to Crater lake to see this.  

 

Myles, this is a place you should definitely check out.  It is awesome.

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i've put it on my list for my next trip out west.    it won't be this year.   My daughter is singing at Carnegie Hall so my wife, other daughter and myself are going to go see here and spend a little while in New York City.  Then going to the Richmond area where my older daughter lives.   

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3 hours ago, Myles said:

i've put it on my list for my next trip out west.    it won't be this year.   

Excellent news about Carnegie Hall.    We'll keep the lake safe for you until you have a chance to see it.

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What a wonderful story! :)

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Okay, i heard of this years back never knew the story, so im guessing the submerged part didnt rot due to cold water but why hasnt the top rotted away?

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48 minutes ago, the13bats said:

Okay, i heard of this years back never knew the story, so im guessing the submerged part didnt rot due to cold water but why hasnt the top rotted away?

I wondered the same thing.  Been floating for at least 125 years.   

I don't think there is anything supernatural about it, but I'd like to see it (maybe touch it).  

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8 minutes ago, Myles said:

I wondered the same thing.  Been floating for at least 125 years.   

I don't think there is anything supernatural about it, but I'd like to see it (maybe touch it).  

Yeah, kind weird, things tend to rot quickly here in florida.

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Water in crater lake is cold and not rich in nutrients.  There are no natural inlets like streams to bring minerals and sediments. Algae does not grow in it to any great extent.  That might be part of the reason.   

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