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Ice-age remains near Sea of Galilee show ancient residents thrived as ice melted


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

A new article published today in PLOS ONE by a Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)'s Institute of Archaeology team and colleagues focused on the remains of a previously submerged fisher-hunter-gatherer camp on the shores of the Sea of Galilee from around 23,000 years ago. Through a close analysis of the abundance, variety and through use of animal remains, the team concluded that these survivors of the latest Ice Age thrived whereas most of their contemporaries, in other parts of the world, were nearly starved, due to the Earth's extremely cold temperatures.

The Israeli site, known as Ohalo II, was occupied at the end of the last Ice Age ("Last Glacial Maximum"), between 23,500 and 22,500 years ago. Ohalo II is known for the excellent preservation of its brush huts and botanical remains.

https://phys.org/news/2022-01-ice-age-sea-galilee-ancient-residents.html

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0262434

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Just now, Still Waters said:

A new article published today in PLOS ONE by a Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)'s Institute of Archaeology team and colleagues focused on the remains of a previously submerged fisher-hunter-gatherer camp on the shores of the Sea of Galilee from around 23,000 years ago. Through a close analysis of the abundance, variety and through use of animal remains, the team concluded that these survivors of the latest Ice Age thrived whereas most of their contemporaries, in other parts of the world, were nearly starved, due to the Earth's extremely cold temperatures.

The Israeli site, known as Ohalo II, was occupied at the end of the last Ice Age ("Last Glacial Maximum"), between 23,500 and 22,500 years ago. Ohalo II is known for the excellent preservation of its brush huts and botanical remains.

https://phys.org/news/2022-01-ice-age-sea-galilee-ancient-residents.html

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0262434

Makes sense that those near the equator fared better then others. 

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1 hour ago, Autochthon1990 said:

Makes sense that those near the equator fared better then others. 

Not necessarily an accurate understanding. In even more northern climes, the glacial margins were, based upon the feeding habits of a number of forms of game including the megafauna, desirable locations for resource procurement. This pattern is still observable in more modern times in regards to the traditional harvesting of species such as caribou.

 

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