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How long have is been known that COVID-19 is dangerous


stereologist
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It seems that every day there are people that need to be reminded of how dangerous COVID-19 actually is. They pretend that you get sick and die or you get sick and walk away unscathed. Somehow they have shut out of their minds the clear and obvious horror of this disease. Since December of 2019 it has been clear that COVID-19 is a dangerous disease that can cause injury that is long lasting, probably permanent injury.

The first hints of the danger were the observed hypoxia of people with this disease that was an "unusual pneumonia"  in patients in China. That was in December of 2019 long before it was detected outside of China. Hypoxia is low oxygen levels. Normally a person in good health has over 95% of their hemoglobin bound, but in these hypoxia patients they were down to 85% and seemed unaware of their inability to properly breath. They were unaware of the low oxygen levels throughout their bodies.

https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/hypoxia

https://www.healthline.com/health/hypoxemia

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Another value reported by the ABG test is oxygen saturation. This is a measure of how much oxygen is being carried by hemoglobin on your red blood cells. Normal values for oxygen saturation are between 95 and 100 percentTrusted Source .

Right from the start there were clear danger signs and those danger signs increased as COVID-19 spread and more people looked into the pathology of the disease.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/worlds-brightest-x-rays-reveal-covid-19-damage-to-the-body?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=Photography_20220129::rid=1325F4460235597B0F183E56A3336D8D

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Using this technique, Ackermann and Jonigk compared the tissues of people who hadn’t died of COVID-19 with those who had. They immediately saw that among COVID-19 victims, the smallest blood vessels in the lungs were distorted and reshaped. These landmark results, published online in May 2020, showed that COVID-19 wasn’t strictly a respiratory disease but a vascular one—one that could affect organs across the entire body.

A year and a half ago a paper was published showing that this disease was not a you die or you full recover disease,but a disease that could leave a victim in a permanently damaged condition.

Research on the extent and form of the damage has driven the development of new technologies to investigate COVID-19 pathology.

https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/rccm.202103-0594IM

This November 2021 article highlights the extent of damage done by COVID-19. These same effects happen even in the asymptomatic.

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The primary life-limiting pulmonary morbidity of severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is characterized by pulmonary endothelialitis, microangiopathy, and aberrant angiogenesis (1). Although numerous studies have highlighted the pronounced microangiopathy in pulmonary circulation, the impact of the bronchial vascular system has not been fully elucidated.

In further posts, the damage done by COVID-19 will be recorded to provide a source of information about the damage done to COVID-19 survivors.

 

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How many people are injured by COVID-19 and appear to have lasting injury? Here is an article from the end of January 2022.

https://www.msn.com/en-in/health/medical/lung-abnormalities-found-in-long-covid-patients-with-breathlessness/ar-AAThawr

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“These patients have never been in hospital and did not have an acute severe illness when they had their COVID-19 infection. Some of them have been experiencing their symptoms for a year after contracting COVID-19,” said Gleeson

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“More than a million people in the UK continue to experience symptoms months after having COVID-19, with breathlessness one of the most commonly reported symptoms.

 

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More information on lung damage can be found in the thread listed below.

 

 

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Since the early days o the pandemic there has been a condition known as brain fog that has been connected to people that were infected with COVID-19. It has been difficult to determine if the condition was a psychological condition or a physical condition.

A nurse that contracted the disease in March of 2020 has been unable to read above a 7th grade level and is hoping to one day be able to get back into her profession. Other people lose the sense of taste or smell and recover or in some cases do not.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/967098?uac=389284HY&faf=1&sso=true&impID=3969922&src=mkm_covid_update_220124_MSCPEDIT

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Impaired cognition associated with COVID-19 appears to have a biological vs psychological basis, early research suggests.

Investigators found abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and other risk factors, including diabetes and hypertension, present in individuals with mild COVID-19 experiencing persistent cognitive problems, often referred to as "brain fog."

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There is currently no guidance on how to identify patients with COVID-related cognitive changes, said Hellmuth. "The term 'brain fog' is not based in science or medicine, but that's the most common term we use to describe this."

PASC is post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, sequelae is something that happens due to a disease.

In this study they looked at people that had mild symptoms and found physical changes.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acn3.51498

 

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The question of course is the prevalence of these problems. How often are people experiencing long term effects of COVID-19 infections? Is it rare such as deaths from vaccines or is it common?

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/967257?uac=389284HY&faf=1&sso=true&impID=3972633&src=mkm_covid_update_220125_MSCPEDIT

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The exploratory, multicenter prospective study included 246 patients 1 year after ICU treatment for COVID in 11 hospitals in the Netherlands. Researchers found that 74.3% reported physical symptoms (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.3% to 79.6%), 26.2% reported mental health symptoms (95% CI, 20.8% to 32.2%), and 16.2% reported cognitive symptoms.

In this study if you ended up in the ICU you are very likely to experience long term problems.

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"This study shows what an incredible impact an ICU admission has on the lives of former COVID-19 patients. Even after one year, half [are] tired or experience lack of the energy to fully resume their work,"

Here is a link tot e study in JAMA

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2788504

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The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a surge of critically ill patients who required treatment in intensive care units (ICUs), with many survivors of critical illness at risk of experiencing long-term impairments.1 Post-ICU symptoms can be divided within the physical, mental, and cognitive domain and are associated with increased 1-year mortality, higher health care costs, and lower quality of life (QoL).

 

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On 1/30/2022 at 10:52 AM, stereologist said:

How many people are injured by COVID-19 and appear to have lasting injury? Here is an article from the end of January 2022.

https://www.msn.com/en-in/health/medical/lung-abnormalities-found-in-long-covid-patients-with-breathlessness/ar-AAThawr

 

Unfortunately the daughter, who is in her late 40's, of good friends of mine fell sick of covid in the first wave of 2020. She was in a hospital for three months. Since then she has some sort of brain damage where her sense of balance is off. Can't focus, can't stand or walk for long. She has received 6 months ago the vaccine and looks like she is somewhat better but far from good. Now doctors told her to wait with the second dose until they see more improvement. Very sad situation.

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36 minutes ago, odas said:

Unfortunately the daughter, who is in her late 40's, of good friends of mine fell sick of covid in the first wave of 2020. She was in a hospital for three months. Since then she has some sort of brain damage where her sense of balance is off. Can't focus, can't stand or walk for long. She has received 6 months ago the vaccine and looks like she is somewhat better but far from good. Now doctors told her to wait with the second dose until they see more improvement. Very sad situation.

The vaccine is not a cure. It will not repair any damage done by a disease she had before. If she believes that she is in for major disappointment. If a doctor told her that they should have their medical license revoked.

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41 minutes ago, Michelle said:

The vaccine is not a cure. It will not repair any damage done by a disease she had before. If she believes that she is in for major disappointment. If a doctor told her that they should have their medical license revoked.

? The disease WAS covid. After the first dose there are some improvements. Will it help or not is up to the advise and findings of the doctors who carred well for her and not up to some Odas or some Michelle, both with apsolutelly zero experience in virology and bacterial science. Hope that explainse it.

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On 1/30/2022 at 8:12 AM, stereologist said:

Hypoxia is low oxygen levels.

All people with pneumonia have low oxygen levels, that's why they end up in the hospital, because they can't breathe due to fluid on the lungs.    It happens to some when they get the flu too.   The thing that flu doesn't usually do is cause blood clots in the lungs, which Covid19 does.

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54 minutes ago, odas said:

? The disease WAS covid. After the first dose there are some improvements. Will it help or not is up to the advise and findings of the doctors who carred well for her and not up to some Odas or some Michelle, both with apsolutelly zero experience in virology and bacterial science. Hope that explainse it.

The vaccine isn't a cure I think Pfizer have a pill available that is claimed to provide remedy for covid sickness by reducing severity.

All I know is that our govt bought them by the plane load perhaps that's what they gave her?

If not then i agree with Michelle.

 

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58 minutes ago, odas said:

? The disease WAS covid. After the first dose there are some improvements. Will it help or not is up to the advise and findings of the doctors who carred well for her and not up to some Odas or some Michelle, both with apsolutelly zero experience in virology and bacterial science. Hope that explainse it.

But, if it lessens the severity of the disease, or the side effects, why won't they give it to people who have Covid already? They won't give it to people in the hospital for severe cases like your friend or she would have gotten it at that time. It stands to reason the vaccine won't reverse physical conditions afterwards.

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7 minutes ago, taniwha said:

The vaccine isn't a cure I think Pfizer have a pill available that is claimed to provide remedy for covid sickness by reducing severity.

All I know is that our govt bought them by the plane load perhaps that's what they gave her?

If not then i agree with Michelle.

 

Yeah and we know how well the Tamiflu worked out.   I doubt that new pill for Covid19 will be any better.   Ask a doctor at the hospital why they don't use Tamiflu.   The answer I got was that it does not work.   It is a virus, if you want to feel better you do everything you can to boost your immune system including staying in bed at least a day or two to give your body a chance.  You don't use some pharmaceutical pill (designed solely to make money) to keep yourself on your feet.   

Edited by Desertrat56
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Quote

154343279.jpg

- circa 1500 CE

~

 

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5 hours ago, odas said:

? The disease WAS covid. After the first dose there are some improvements. Will it help or not is up to the advise and findings of the doctors who carred well for her and not up to some Odas or some Michelle, both with apsolutelly zero experience in virology and bacterial science. Hope that explainse it.

I don't know that we've ever had a treatment for brain damage other than rehab and keeping mentally active.

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7 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

All people with pneumonia have low oxygen levels, that's why they end up in the hospital, because they can't breathe due to fluid on the lungs.    It happens to some when they get the flu too.   The thing that flu doesn't usually do is cause blood clots in the lungs, which Covid19 does.

In the OP it is pointed out that the low oxygen levels with COVID-19 are not due to fluid in or on the lungs. It is alteration of the vascularization. The restructuring of the blood supply limits the ability of gasses to be exchanged in the lungs.

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Using this technique, Ackermann and Jonigk compared the tissues of people who hadn’t died of COVID-19 with those who had. They immediately saw that among COVID-19 victims, the smallest blood vessels in the lungs were distorted and reshaped. These landmark results, published online in May 2020, showed that COVID-19 wasn’t strictly a respiratory disease but a vascular one—one that could affect organs across the entire body.

Quote

The primary life-limiting pulmonary morbidity of severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is characterized by pulmonary endothelialitis, microangiopathy, and aberrant angiogenesis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endotheliitis

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Endotheliitis is an immune response within the endothelium in blood vessels, in which they become inflamed.

https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/microangiopathy

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Any defect of very small blood vessels, usually capillaries, which is most common in diabetes, especially if poorly controlled.

https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/angiogenesis

Quote

any formation of new blood vessels

 

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6 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Yeah and we know how well the Tamiflu worked out.   I doubt that new pill for Covid19 will be any better.   Ask a doctor at the hospital why they don't use Tamiflu.   The answer I got was that it does not work.   It is a virus, if you want to feel better you do everything you can to boost your immune system including staying in bed at least a day or two to give your body a chance.  You don't use some pharmaceutical pill (designed solely to make money) to keep yourself on your feet.   

The antiviral pills that have been development for COVID-19 are meant to keep someone out of the hospital. They are not meant to cure the viral disease. In fact, there is no cure for any viral disease.

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20211229/the-new-covid-antiviral-pills-what-you-need-to-know#1

And these pills have lots of limitations such as the following:

Quote

People infected with COVID will need to start taking either antiviral pill within five days of their first symptoms for the drugs to have any hope of quelling their illness.

 

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A vaccine does not and is not intended to reverse damage. The vaccine is used to ready the body to deal with an infection.

It is likely that someone misunderstood what they were given and thought that one of the intravenous monoclonal antibody treatments was the vaccine. The monoclonal antibody treatments can reduce symptoms as they reduce the viral load.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/covid-pills-get-antiviral-drugs-testing-positive-rcna13474

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Unlike all other FDA-authorized Covid treatments, which need to be given intravenously or by injection from a health care provider, the two antiviral pills — Pfizer's Paxlovid and Merck's molnupiravir — can be picked up at a pharmacy and taken at home.

https://www.drugs.com/medical-answers/effective-paxlovid-covid-19-3564414/

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Final data of a study (ERIC-HR Phase 2/3 ) shows when Paxlovid is taken within 3 days of COVID-19 symptom onset, it successfully decreases the risk of being hospitalized by 89% for patients that are at high risk of COVID-19 progressing to severe illness. When taken within 5 days of symptom onset, Paxlovid reduces the risk of being hospitalized by 88%.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34159342/

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Among 202 treated participants, virus isolation was significantly lower in participants receiving 800 mg molnupiravir (1.9%) versus placebo (16.7%) at Day 3 (p = 0.02). At Day 5, virus was not isolated from any participants receiving 400 or 800 mg molnupiravir, versus 11.1% of those receiving placebo (p = 0.03). Time to viral RNA clearance was decreased and a greater proportion overall achieved clearance in participants administered 800 mg molnupiravir versus placebo (p = 0.01).

 

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9 hours ago, Golden Duck said:

I don't know that we've ever had a treatment for brain damage other than rehab and keeping mentally active.

That is why they are waiting for the second dose. Some improvement is there but the doctors are waiting for more and to give her the second shot could make things worse at this time. Also, she is treated in Italy where she lives.

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At this point we have shown that COVID-19 is a dangerous disease and that danger has been recognized even when the disease was only detected in China at the end of 2019. It has been shown that COVID-19 causes damage to the lung tissue and the vascularization of the lung. It has also been shown that COVID-19 damages the brain.

The next evidence concerns the kidneys.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8347536/

This paper is from August 2021 and looks into the damage done to kidneys. Notice this is "acute kidney injury"

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COVID-19 is mainly considered a respiratory illness, but since SARS-CoV-2 uses the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor (ACE2) to enter human cells, the kidney is also a target of the viral infection. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most alarming condition in COVID-19 patients. Recent studies have confirmed the direct entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the renal cells, namely podocytes and proximal tubular cells, but this is not the only pathomechanism of kidney damage.

Here is a video from April 2020, just months after COVID-19 as entered the US and it is known that COVID-19 damages the kidneys with a large percentage of people that are ill having kidney injury.

 

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https://blogs.bcm.edu/2021/03/11/how-does-covid-19-impact-the-kidneys/
 

A year later and more is known about COVID-19 and the damage it does to kidneys.

Quote

Some of the most critically ill patients with COVID even required temporary dialysis,” Raghavan said. “The kidneys often take weeks to recover; hence, COVID survivors may present to our clinic with lingering  aftereffects of their disease. This manifests as blood or protein in the urine, or a reduction in the percent of kidney function, known as the glomerular filtration rate.”

By September of 2021 it is becoming apparent that permanent damage is being done by COVID-19.

https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/covid-19-long-haulers-at-risk-of-developing-kidney-damage-disease/

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Research continues to mount indicating that many people who’ve had COVID-19 go on to suffer a range of adverse conditions months after their initial infections. A deep dive into federal health data adds to those concerns, pointing to a significant decline in kidney function among those dubbed COVID-19 long-haulers — and even among those who had mild infections of the virus.

The data, plumbed by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System, show that those infected with SARS-CoV-2 are at an increased likelihood of developing kidney damage as well as chronic and end-stage kidney diseases.

So even if your disease appeared to be mild you might suffer permanent kidney damage just as asymptomatic people suffer permanent lung damage.

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16 hours ago, Michelle said:

But, if it lessens the severity of the disease, or the side effects, why won't they give it to people who have Covid already? They won't give it to people in the hospital for severe cases like your friend or she would have gotten it at that time. It stands to reason the vaccine won't reverse physical conditions afterwards.

They give it again because like other coronavirus sickness, you can catch it back after a couple of month... better for her to not getting it back in full force. Lots of recurrent problems are caused by lacks of oxygen that can damage brain cells. It take time for them to regenerate and most of the time it will never happen. But brain learn to live without it, maybe just coincidence involverd for her amelioration. Maybe a placebo effect too...

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Now here is the scary part of COVID-19 when it comes to kidneys.

https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/covid-19-long-haulers-at-risk-of-developing-kidney-damage-disease/

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“Based on our research, we believe that 510,000 of those people who have had COVID-19 may have kidney injury or disease,” Al-Aly said.

That's a half a million back in September of 2021.

And if you ant to wonder if only the ICU patients might have kidney problems think again

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“The risk of decreased kidney function is highest among people who were in the ICU; however, it’s important to note that the risk extends to all patients, even those who had milder cases of COVID-19,”

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Compared with patients who did not become infected, people who contracted the virus but did not need to be hospitalized for it had a 15% higher risk of suffering from a major adverse kidney event such as chronic kidney disease, a 30% higher risk of developing acute kidney injury, and a 215% (more than twofold) higher risk of acquiring end-stage kidney disease. The latter occurs when the kidneys can no longer effectively remove waste from the body. In such cases, dialysis or a kidney transplant is needed to keep patients alive.

This is not a disease where there is a simple dichotomy.

  1. you die
  2. you recover and no worries.
Quote

“Kidney disease is one important facet of the multifaceted long COVID-19,” he said. “It is a critical component of the long COVID-19 story, and it must be taken into account when caring for people with long COVID-19.”

 

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11 hours ago, stereologist said:

The antiviral pills that have been development for COVID-19 are meant to keep someone out of the hospital. They are not meant to cure the viral disease. In fact, there is no cure for any viral disease.

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20211229/the-new-covid-antiviral-pills-what-you-need-to-know#1

And these pills have lots of limitations such as the following:

 

Right, that's what I said, the only cure for a viral disease is a strong immune system that can create the anti-bodies to fight it.   Just because they don't claim it is a cure does not mean people will think it is, because, you know, humans, they think what they want and pretend like someone told them.   

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If we go back to April of last year we see that heart issues were associated with COVID-19 infections.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/can-coronavirus-cause-heart-damage

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Early reports coming out of China and Italy, two areas where COVID-19 took hold earlier in the pandemic, show that up to 1 in 5 patients with the illness end up with heart damage. Heart failure has been the cause of death in COVID-19 patients, even those without severe breathing problems such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS.

Not all heart problems related to this coronavirus — officially called SARS-CoV-2—are alike, however. Cardiologist Erin Michos, M.D., M.H.S., explains the different ways the virus — and the body’s response to it — can cause heart damage.

Right there it tells us that COVID-19 was known right away to injure the heart.

Still the foolish want to pretend that COVID-19 is a die or nothing situation. That false dichotomy has been their bread and butter as they argue foolishly about the pandemic.

Again we establish that early it was known that COVID-19 can injure the heart.

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Patients without known heart disease who get COVID-19 should follow up with their primary care doctor. Tests may be recommended if symptoms such as weakness, shortness of breath or chest pain persist after recovery, since these problems could be due to COVID-19-related damage to the lungs or heart.

 

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The SARS-CoV-2 virus can damage the heart in several ways. For example, the virus may directly invade or inflame the heart muscle, and it may indirectly harm the heart by disrupting the balance between oxygen supply and demand. Heart injury, which may be measured by elevated levels of the enzyme troponin in the bloodstream, has been detected in about one-quarter of patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19 illness. Of these patients, about one-third have pre-existing CVD.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/covid-19-and-the-heart-what-have-we-learned-2021010621603

This is a later article from November 2021.

Let's jump over a year earlier to September 2020 when the pandemic is well underway.

https://www.heart.org/en/news/2020/09/03/what-covid-19-is-doing-to-the-heart-even-after-recovery

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A growing number of studies suggest many COVID-19 survivors experience some type of heart damage, even if they didn't have underlying heart disease and weren't sick enough to be hospitalized. This latest twist has health care experts worried about a potential increase in heart failure.

"Very early into the pandemic, it was clear that many patients who were hospitalized were showing evidence of cardiac injury," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, chief of the division of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. "More recently, there is recognition that even some of those COVID-19 patients not hospitalized are experiencing cardiac injury. This raises concerns that there may be individuals who get through the initial infection, but are left with cardiovascular damage and complications."

 

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