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New species of ancient crocodile's last meal may have been a dinosaur - "It's a world first."


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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Australian scientists have announced the discovery not only of a new species of crocodile - but also that its last meal may have been a dinosaur.

The fossilised remains of the crocodile, named Confractosuchus sauroktonos - the broken dinosaur killer - were recovered from a sheep station in Queensland and are believed to be more than 95 million years old.

While piecing together the crocodile, the researchers found the skeletal remains of a small juvenile ornithopod dinosaur inside its stomach.

They say it is the first evidence of crocodiles eating dinosaurs in Australia.

https://news.sky.com/story/dinosaur-remains-found-inside-95-million-year-old-skeleton-of-newly-discovered-crocodile-in-australia-12541024

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-02-12/broken-dinosaur-killer-croc-ate-dinosaur-for-last-meal/100823384

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I thought crocodiles are dinosaurs.

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56 minutes ago, Desertrat56 said:

I thought crocodiles are dinosaurs.

They are not.

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16 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

I thought crocodiles are dinosaurs.

Quote

They are not.

Yet, both a crocodiles & dinosaurs have a common ancestor - the archosaurs. Birds and crocodilians are the only known still living archosaur groups.

Archosaurus:

Pseudosuchian archosaurs - Petrified Forest National Park (U.S. National  Park Service)

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2 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

Yet, both a crocodiles & dinosaurs have a common ancestor - the archosaurs. Birds and crocodilians are the only known still living archosaur groups.

Archosaurus:

Pseudosuchian archosaurs - Petrified Forest National Park (U.S. National  Park Service)

Sharks are also descended from dinosaus.  The one called Megalodon.  

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Sometimes I feel like a dinosaur.
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27 minutes ago, pallidin said:

Sometimes I feel like a dinosaur.

Me too.

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9 hours ago, Desertrat56 said:

Sharks are also descended from dinosaus.  The one called Megalodon.  

No, just no! Sharks have absolutely nothing to do with dinosaurs! They've also been around (in various forms) for a lot longer than dinosaurs.

Edited by Jaded1
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13 hours ago, Jaded1 said:

No, just no! Sharks have absolutely nothing to do with dinosaurs! They've also been around (in various forms) for a lot longer than dinosaurs.

Then why were they at the dinosaur show I took my grandson to?    :lol:

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On 2/15/2022 at 2:24 PM, Desertrat56 said:

Then why were they at the dinosaur show I took my grandson to?    :lol:

Probably because sharks were around when the dinosaurs were (i.e. were contemporaneous). As I said, sharks have been around for a longer period than the dinosaurs; they were there before the dinosaurs and are still here way after the dinosaurs died out in the extinction event roughly 66 million years ago. Sharks are fish, not dinosaurs.

Even creatures that most would class as dinosaurs, such as plesiosaurs, were marine reptiles, rather than dinosaurs, and they get lumped in with dinosaurs in exhibitions because they were contemporaneous. 

If you don't believe me, maybe you'll believe wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shark

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Go back far enough, and find out all animal groups/families/whatever are related.

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"New species of ancient crocodile's last meal may have been a dinosaur"

I will bet many or even most who clicked on this topic had a totally different image in front of their mind's eye.

Something like this (pliosaurus vs. t-rex) :

pliosaur-bite-force-768x637.jpg.9fec899c10546d150f3eb1e1ac3055ad.jpg

Edited by Abramelin
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1 hour ago, Abramelin said:

Go back far enough, and find out all animal groups/families/whatever are related.

Technically, yes, but that has no relevance whatsoever to what I'm trying to say. We all evolved from whatever micro-organism was the first "lifeform" to emerge from the "primordial soup". A shark is not a dinosaur much in the way that, for example, a human is not a cephalopod, even though all evolved from that first micro-organism. It's really not a hard concept to grasp.

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3 minutes ago, Jaded1 said:

Technically, yes, but that has no relevance whatsoever to what I'm trying to say. We all evolved from whatever micro-organism was the first "lifeform" to emerge from the "primordial soup". A shark is not a dinosaur much in the way that, for example, a human is not a cephalopod, even though all evolved from that first micro-organism. It's really not a hard concept to grasp.

Don't worry, I dò understand.

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2 hours ago, Abramelin said:

"New species of ancient crocodile's last meal may have been a dinosaur"

I will bet many or even most who clicked on this topic had a totally different image in front of their mind's eye.

Something like this (pliosaurus vs. t-rex) :

pliosaur-bite-force-768x637.jpg.9fec899c10546d150f3eb1e1ac3055ad.jpg

Damn, there actually were crocs large enough to have fully grown dinos for a meal:

https://www.livescience.com/terror-crocodile-banana-teeth.html

306082126_AlbertosaurisDeinosuchus.webp.0f1cc4a365b11747a93ceb405e3cf1e8.webp

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