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Why the Vikings left Greenland


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 One of the great mysteries of late medieval history is why did the Norse, who had established successful settlements in southern Greenland in 985, abandon them in the early 15th century?

The consensus view has long been that colder temperatures, associated with the Little Ice Age, helped make the colonies unsustainable.

However, new research, led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst and published recently in Science Advances, upends that old theory.

It wasn’t dropping temperatures that helped drive the Norse from Greenland, but drought.

https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/947227

Prolonged drying trend coincident with the demise of Norse settlement in southern Greenland.

Science

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A drought is the most common reason of a 'disappearance' and departure of the people and civilizations. For. ex the Mayans were destroyed by the drought and thirst, not by the Spaniards and Inquisition as it's most commonly considered. 

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-did-the-mayan-civilization-collapse-a-new-study-points-to-deforestation-and-climate-change-30863026/

As a result, the rapid deforestation exacerbated an already severe drought—in the simulation, deforestation reduced precipitation by five to 15 percent and was responsible for 60 percent of the total drying that occurred over the course of a century as the Mayan civilization collapsed.

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Jared Diamond had quite a bit to say about Greenland in his book Collapse.  I didn't know that Greenland once housed one of the largest dairies in the medieval world for example.

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52 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Jared Diamond had quite a bit to say about Greenland in his book Collapse.  I didn't know that Greenland once housed one of the largest dairies in the medieval world for example.

He's written some thought-provoking books.  I know he's got his critics, but I find his take on things to be fairly plausible.

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Posted (edited)

Why the Greenland colony collapse was probably due to a variety of reasons which particular one was the most damaging is unknown but I would guess it was the climate variation that caused the most concern and collapse of agricultural aspects of the site.

Viking%20Inuit%20temperatures.png

https://sites.google.com/a/carleton.edu/civilization-collapse/introduction-to-inuit/history/contact-with-vikings

All the factors probably finally did them in.

https://sites.google.com/a/carleton.edu/civilization-collapse/introduction-to-inuit/why-did-they-survive

Edited by Hanslune
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beddy interestink

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I always assumed they spread out so they could rape and pillage ;) 

My wife's family is from Norway and when we were first getting acquainted, I asked her who her ancestors were and she never missed a beat:

"They're the ones who raped and pillaged YOURS".   :w00t:

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Hmm,.. so it had nothing to do with moving from in front of the Pillars of Hercules then.:tu:

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49 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Hmm,.. so it had nothing to do with moving from in front of the Pillars of Hercules then.:tu:

This is well after the roller skates were removed and Greenland was anchored in place.

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They left because of they had nothing to plunder in that icy wasteland. :D

Angry, angry Icelanders. | Icelandic Language Blog

 

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19 hours ago, Hanslune said:

This is well after the roller skates were removed and Greenland was anchored in place.

Ok, soooooo after "the Great Mincing"?

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8 hours ago, Trelane said:

Ok, soooooo after "the Great Mincing"?

Singlefoot!!!:o

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Maybe they just ran out of beer and mead. 

Dought. How far was it to the nearest glacial ice? Bringing enough for the animals and roast probably would have been a full time job by itself though.

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4 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Maybe they just ran out of beer and mead. 

Dought. How far was it to the nearest glacial ice? Bringing enough for the animals and roast probably would have been a full time job by itself though.

When the air is cold, it's dry and grasses won't grow on frozen ground.

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19 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Maybe they just ran out of beer and mead. 

Dought. How far was it to the nearest glacial ice? Bringing enough for the animals and roast probably would have been a full time job by itself though.

They couldn't find a good veggie burger anywhere.  That's the real reason.

And it's...THIS far to the nearest glacier.  In summer.  (uphill, both ways)
See the source image

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Money. It wasn't profitable anymore - the northern ivory trade. 

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Posted (edited)

Edit.

Edited by Skirnum
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Posted (edited)
On 4/1/2022 at 11:00 AM, Bavarian Raven said:

Money. It wasn't profitable anymore - the northern ivory trade. 

Would that be Flokilokinihilipilification?

1280v5_07_09_19_2016_bw_13339.jpg?h=c673

Edited by Golden Duck
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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't believe that theory with all the ice they could melt into fresh water. I think it was starvation & disease. 

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It's quite cold there. So if they went there during a relatively mild period in the climate and it turned colder, they probably saw the writing on the wall and headed out of there before they turned into human popsicles. 

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2 hours ago, CuCulaine said:

I don't believe that theory with all the ice they could melt into fresh water. I think it was starvation & disease. 

If the ground is frozen all year, that pretty much rules out plant based nutrition. I guess you can eat some lichens. Maybe seaweed. Sounds tough for sure. You might just get tired of that after a while when you know there are greener pastures if you head back south. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Greenland was turned into a quarry by the past technical civilization, traces of which are left in the form of semicircular jagged workings. What happens if you cut down the forest at the equator? There will be a desert. And what happens if you remove a completely fertile layer of soil? There will be numerous American canyons. And if you cut down a forest several kilometers high in the northern latitudes, then mountains will remain. But even in them you can recognize former but already petrified trees if you look closely. But this is all an alternative history of technical civilization and few people will believe in it, but traces of it are found even there. All catastrophes on earth occurred initially through the fault of creatures, therefore, because of them, the ice age, the extinction of dinosaurs, the change of poles, meteorites falling on the planet, the sinking of continents, deserts and canyons, waterfalls happened.

Spoiler

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On 4/22/2022 at 2:32 PM, CuCulaine said:

I don't believe that theory with all the ice they could melt into fresh water. I think it was starvation & disease. 

Yet, the indigenous people survived and still live there based on on old traditions. 

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