Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Near-death experiences: four possible theories


UM-Bot
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, psyche101 said:

Why do you make stuff up? 

https://www.resuscitationjournal.com/article/S0300-9572(14)00739-4/fulltext

Several studies have formed this theory. 

 

Methods

The incidence and validity of awareness together with the range, characteristics and themes relating to memories/cognitive processes during CA was investigated through a 4 year multi-center observational study using a three stage quantitative and qualitative interview system. The feasibility of objectively testing the accuracy of claims of visual and auditory awareness was examined using specific tests. The outcome measures were (1) awareness/memories during CA and (2) objective verification of claims of awareness using specific tests.

Results

Among 2060 CA events, 140 survivors completed stage 1 interviews, while 101 of 140 patients completed stage 2 interviews. 46% had memories with 7 major cognitive themes: fear; animals/plants; bright light; violence/persecution; deja-vu; family; recalling events post-CA and 9% had NDEs, while 2% described awareness with explicit recall of ‘seeing’ and ‘hearing’ actual events related to their resuscitation. One had a verifiable period of conscious awareness during which time cerebral function was not expected.

Conclusions

CA survivors commonly experience a broad range of cognitive themes, with 2% exhibiting full awareness. This supports other recent studies that have indicated consciousness may be present despite clinically undetectable consciousness. This together with fearful experiences may contribute to PTSD and other cognitive deficits post CA.

 

And that was penned in 2014.

Here is a list of follow up studies that you keep saying do not exist. Which is just another lie, or ignorant assumption. Take your pick. 

https://www.resuscitationjournal.com/action/doSearch?AllField="Near death experiences"&journalCode=resus

 

Or you could read up and stop making crap up on the spot. 

That's an older view. Has been for several years now. 

Suffice to say, you're wrong.

Ohhhhhh what a lie. 

Belief isn't science. Read your sentence again, it's a bloody oxymoron genius. 

You are an enemy of reason.

Mmm isn’t that exactly my argument though? That consciousness remains present? Even when a person is clinically dead. Thanks for sharing. 
 

If I am an enemy of reason, you should be more careful inadvertently supporting my arguments. 

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, preacherman76 said:

Mmm isn’t that exactly my argument though? That consciousness remains present? Even when a person is clinically dead. Thanks for sharing. 
 

Yes it is your argument. Continuation of consciousness. It doesn't leave the body. It shuts down. Just more slowly than we expected. Higher brain functions are the first to unravel. It means death is final. And slow death is the result of many studies, it's not a wild guess as you insinuated.

And it refutes your claim that the subject is completely ignored by science. All those papers should keep you busy for a few days at least. 

59 minutes ago, preacherman76 said:

If I am an enemy of reason, you should be more careful inadvertently supporting my arguments. 

You certainly are, and I haven't supported anything that you have posted on the subject. I have no idea how you come to that wild conclusion. Perhaps work on your comprehension skills. Your argument is anything but scientific. It's just a rehashed myth. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, psyche101 said:

Yes it is your argument. Continuation of consciousness. It doesn't leave the body. It shuts down. Just more slowly than we expected. Higher brain functions are the first to unravel. It means death is final. And slow death is the result of many studies, it's not a wild guess as you insinuated.

And it refutes your claim that the subject is completely ignored by science. All those papers should keep you busy for a few days at least. 
 

Oh psyche can’t you see?? All you have is observation. Scientifically you have no reason to believe consciousness continues other than the fact it’s been observed. It defies all known neurological science. I have listened to many lectures on this. When there is not a single neuron firing, consciousness isn’t possible. The very idea defies 75 years of study. This is well established. 

1 hour ago, psyche101 said:

You certainly are, and I haven't supported anything that you have posted on the subject. I have no idea how you come to that wild conclusion. Perhaps work on your comprehension skills. Your argument is anything but scientific. It's just a rehashed myth. 

Whatever gets you through the night man. Speaking of which, have a good night. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, preacherman76 said:

Oh psyche can’t you see?? All you have is observation.

Observation of brain waves with sensitive instruments. What more could you possibly want? We watch the activity disapate. 

40 minutes ago, preacherman76 said:

Scientifically you have no reason to believe consciousness continues other than the fact it’s been observed. It defies all known neurological science. I have listened to many lectures on this. When there is not a single neuron firing, consciousness isn’t possible. The very idea defies 75 years of study. This is well established. 

Old ideas.

A study by Norton in 2017 recorded EEG activity in 4 terminal patients having their life-support turned off. One of the four patients displayed brain activity well into 10 minutes after they were declared clinically dead (i.e. absence of pulse or pupillary action). This patient experienced similar brain waves as to what is typically seen in deep sleep. This was in contrast to the slow death wave seen in the previous study that is seen in some people leading up to their moment of death.

https://www.news-medical.net/amp/health/What-Happens-to-the-Brain-After-Death.aspx

The cerebral cortex isn't the entire brain. 

That's what's changed in 75 years. 

40 minutes ago, preacherman76 said:

Whatever gets you through the night man. Speaking of which, have a good night. 

That's a strange comment. You want to explain what I've posted that supports your argument? Did you know that cells in your body work furiously as if you were alive for days after death? Trying to carry out normal functions and repair damage? 

You have a good night as well. I've still got a few hours in my day. Suns just going down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, psyche101 said:

Observation of brain waves with sensitive instruments. What more could you possibly want? We watch the activity disapate. 

Old ideas.

A study by Norton in 2017 recorded EEG activity in 4 terminal patients having their life-support turned off. One of the four patients displayed brain activity well into 10 minutes after they were declared clinically dead (i.e. absence of pulse or pupillary action). This patient experienced similar brain waves as to what is typically seen in deep sleep. This was in contrast to the slow death wave seen in the previous study that is seen in some people leading up to their moment of death.

https://www.news-medical.net/amp/health/What-Happens-to-the-Brain-After-Death.aspx

The cerebral cortex isn't the entire brain. 

That's what's changed in 75 years. 

That's a strange comment. You want to explain what I've posted that supports your argument? Did you know that cells in your body work furiously as if you were alive for days after death? Trying to carry out normal functions and repair damage? 

You have a good night as well. I've still got a few hours in my day. Suns just going down.

It’s 3 am here. I usually have trouble staying asleep around this time, so I’m up again. Last post for the night. I’ll probably toss and turn next couple hours. Then I’ll be ready for an hour or so of sleep just as I have to get up lol. 
 

Ahh shoot, I have some ideas but confesses I haven’t read this through yet. Maybe it will help me go back to sleep. I’ll give it the attention it deserves. On the morrow psyche. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, psyche101 said:

Observation of brain waves with sensitive instruments. What more could you possibly want? We watch the activity disapate. 

Old ideas.

A study by Norton in 2017 recorded EEG activity in 4 terminal patients having their life-support turned off. One of the four patients displayed brain activity well into 10 minutes after they were declared clinically dead (i.e. absence of pulse or pupillary action). This patient experienced similar brain waves as to what is typically seen in deep sleep. This was in contrast to the slow death wave seen in the previous study that is seen in some people leading up to their moment of death.

https://www.news-medical.net/amp/health/What-Happens-to-the-Brain-After-Death.aspx

The cerebral cortex isn't the entire brain. 

That's what's changed in 75 years. 

That's a strange comment. You want to explain what I've posted that supports your argument? Did you know that cells in your body work furiously as if you were alive for days after death? Trying to carry out normal functions and repair damage? 

You have a good night as well. I've still got a few hours in my day. Suns just going down.

Ok so I was finally able to read the article. With only one example, certainly this must have sparked a need for more study? Just one would be considered an anomaly no? Possibly even a mistake. Is there anything else? 
 

I mean you don’t really think a single possible case deletes 75 years of neurological science right? 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, preacherman76 said:

Ok so I was finally able to read the article. With only one example, certainly this must have sparked a need for more study? Just one would be considered an anomaly no? Possibly even a mistake. Is there anything else? 
 

I mean you don’t really think a single possible case deletes 75 years of neurological science right? 

That one is the record.

In this instance, another man showed brain activity for seven minutes after death:

https://medium.com/sciention/7-minutes-after-death-youre-alive-8a407d42e32

And this case sparked these new theories:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/brain-scans-suggest-life-flashes-before-our-eyes-upon-death-180979647/

 

Animal experiments are listed in the other link, gruesome experiments where rats brain activity is measured after decapitation, and out brains removed and to a very basic extent revived. Cells started working again, but only random neurones were firing. The network is a neural workshop capable of conceptual thoughts, it's why your brain can imagine an elephant dancing on the head of a pin. We can automatically rescale and create wild combinations due to this ability. 

This link delves a little into the animal experiments:

https://www.news-medical.net/amp/health/What-Happens-to-the-Brain-After-Death.aspx

Rats:

Pre-decapitation, awake animals exhibited consciousness and sensory awareness. Upon decapitation, there was a sharp loss in EEG signal (power to the brain) followed by the presence of artefacts from chewing movements a few seconds post-decapitation. On the whole, the EEG pattern flat-lined in around 15 seconds post-decapitation indicative of no sensory awareness, cognition or alertness.

However, between 50-80 seconds post-decapitation and EEG signal decay, there was a large but slow wave-form on the EEG that was observed in all rats. The authors speculate that this moment is when neurons lose their electrical ability and a huge influx of ions causes a mass depolarisation across the brain synchronously in what they have called a ‘wave of death’. This wave was also seen in another study observing brain waves during death in patients where they observed this large slow wave appear near death

Pigs:

Researchers extracted brains after slaughtering for meat and kept them in special chambers. four hours after death, a synthetic fluid (BrainEx) that mimics blood was pumped into the brain.

BrainEx infusion 4-6 hours after death resulted in the re-establishing of normal cellular metabolism (i.e. utilising glucose to produce ATP) in neurons and other cells.

The structural integrity of cells remained preserved whereas control brains without BrainEx infusion deteriorated. Furthermore, applying electrical stimulation to extracted tissues from revived brains resulted in individual neurons firing, though not in a synchronous network fashion of coordinated patterns across the brain, which would resemble consciousness.

 

There's a great deal more supporting information than the one case. It is the most remarkable. 

And I'm just revealing the tip of the iceberg. There's been increased interest over the last decade. Sam Parnia seems to be leading the pack so to speak. There is profound information regarding resuscitation with the possiblity of full revival. That's the motivation. Bringing back the dead. The neural network is our current wall to climb. If it can be preserved, the dead might rise again to see another day. Neurological sciences aren't wrong, they are simply being revised. There's just more to it than we realised.

Edited by psyche101
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, psyche101 said:

That one is the record.

In this instance, another man showed brain activity for seven minutes after death:

https://medium.com/sciention/7-minutes-after-death-youre-alive-8a407d42e32

And this case sparked these new theories:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/brain-scans-suggest-life-flashes-before-our-eyes-upon-death-180979647/

 

Animal experiments are listed in the other link, gruesome experiments where rats brain activity is measured after decapitation, and out brains removed and to a very basic extent revived. Cells started working again, but only random neurones were firing. The network is a neural workshop capable of conceptual thoughts, it's why your brain can imagine an elephant dancing on the head of a pin. We can automatically rescale and create wild combinations due to this ability. 

This link delves a little into the animal experiments:

https://www.news-medical.net/amp/health/What-Happens-to-the-Brain-After-Death.aspx

Rats:

Pre-decapitation, awake animals exhibited consciousness and sensory awareness. Upon decapitation, there was a sharp loss in EEG signal (power to the brain) followed by the presence of artefacts from chewing movements a few seconds post-decapitation. On the whole, the EEG pattern flat-lined in around 15 seconds post-decapitation indicative of no sensory awareness, cognition or alertness.

However, between 50-80 seconds post-decapitation and EEG signal decay, there was a large but slow wave-form on the EEG that was observed in all rats. The authors speculate that this moment is when neurons lose their electrical ability and a huge influx of ions causes a mass depolarisation across the brain synchronously in what they have called a ‘wave of death’. This wave was also seen in another study observing brain waves during death in patients where they observed this large slow wave appear near death

Pigs:

Researchers extracted brains after slaughtering for meat and kept them in special chambers. four hours after death, a synthetic fluid (BrainEx) that mimics blood was pumped into the brain.

BrainEx infusion 4-6 hours after death resulted in the re-establishing of normal cellular metabolism (i.e. utilising glucose to produce ATP) in neurons and other cells.

The structural integrity of cells remained preserved whereas control brains without BrainEx infusion deteriorated. Furthermore, applying electrical stimulation to extracted tissues from revived brains resulted in individual neurons firing, though not in a synchronous network fashion of coordinated patterns across the brain, which would resemble consciousness.

 

There's a great deal more supporting information than the one case. It is the most remarkable. 

And I'm just revealing the tip of the iceberg. There's been increased interest over the last decade. Sam Parnia seems to be leading the pack so to speak. There is profound information regarding resuscitation with the possiblity of full revival. That's the motivation. Bringing back the dead. The neural network is our current wall to climb. If it can be preserved, the dead might rise again to see another day. Neurological sciences aren't wrong, they are simply being revised. There's just more to it than we realised.

In a world...where a human patient's brain is removed soon after the patient has died and transplanted into an AI Android body where it is then brought back to life...to live...virtually forever!               

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, joc said:

In a world...where a human patient's brain is removed soon after the patient has died and transplanted into an AI Android body where it is then brought back to life...to live...virtually forever!               

If we can maintain that neural network. It's the key. 

There are around as many neural connections in your brain as there are stars in the galaxy. 

That's a lot. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Ok so I’m a bit confused. Seems the article is making claims the researchers did not. 
 

“Results: Electrocerebral inactivity preceded the cessation of the cardiac rhythm and ABP in three patients. In one patient, single delta wave bursts persisted following the cessation of both the cardiac rhythm and ABP. There was a significant difference in EEG amplitude between the 30-minute period before and the 5-minute period following ABP cessation for the group, but we did not observe any well-defined EEG states following the early cardiac arrest period.”

I got this from a link posted at the end of the article  


Having delta wave bursts, while impressive and was I imagine surprising, is a far cry from saying they were in a dream like state. It would require a steady flow of delta waves for that. Not single bursts. 
 

I also find it very strange that this has not been explored further. This should have been a very big deal. Why has no one picked up the torch? 

Edited by preacherman76
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also I’d like to add, and I know this is pretty much impossible to explore, but why are so many NDE’s follow a pattern? With different reactions, categorically there seem to be three phases of the NDE. Often people start out in what they describe as a void. A place of total darkness. Some find it peaceful, some find it terrifying. The other starting phase is the typical out of body experience. Seeing their bodies, and usually feel indifferent to it. Likes they feel it’s no longer needed. The sensation of floating, and or the ability to move around the room, or even leave the room. Many times the experience ends there. They are revived. 
 

For those who go further, wether in that void or having an out of body experience, they usually see a light way off in the distance. The light then expands and gets closer till they are surrounded by it, turning it into a tunnel around them which they are being propelled through. Strong feelings of moving at an incredible speed. 
 

At the end of that tunnel, they begin to see what some would describe as celestial beings of light, and or, people they knew on earth who have died before them. They feel a overwhelming feeling of acceptance, of unconditional love. They move on from there to have a full life review, where they are not judged by those around them, but are helped by them as they judge themselves. Describe feeling everyone’s experience around them in any given part of the review. What it was like to be hurt by there actions or words. This is often overwhelming. 
 

Then usually by a family member, or some even describe by a God like figure are told they have to return. They usually protest, to no avail. 
 

There are millions of these cases, going back all through history and all over the world. I say all this so folks can get a good understanding of how complicated and profound these experiences are. Most are permanently changed following these experiences. 
 

A few delta busts recorded after clinical death in no way can explain this. Nor does it even begin to explain why all these people have such similar experiences. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really when you think about it, if you could confirm even two experiences from different people who don’t know each other that went for better or worse how I described above, it should be considered astonishing. Impossible even. 
 

There are hundreds of thousands of these cases recorded, even long before internet days. As it’s completely dismissed. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/5/2022 at 10:35 AM, psyche101 said:

I've lived a pretty full life. One doesn't need superstition to be complete. 

Yep, superstition is generally silly except for walking under ladders which is occupational safety :tu:

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/7/2022 at 8:02 PM, preacherman76 said:

Ok so I’m a bit confused. Seems the article is making claims the researchers did not. 
 

“Results: Electrocerebral inactivity preceded the cessation of the cardiac rhythm and ABP in three patients. In one patient, single delta wave bursts persisted following the cessation of both the cardiac rhythm and ABP. There was a significant difference in EEG amplitude between the 30-minute period before and the 5-minute period following ABP cessation for the group, but we did not observe any well-defined EEG states following the early cardiac arrest period.”

Before and after death there's delta waves. During cardiac arrest, there aren't. 

I don't think that changes that activity is recorded after brain death. 

On 5/7/2022 at 8:02 PM, preacherman76 said:

I got this from a link posted at the end of the article  


Having delta wave bursts, while impressive and was I imagine surprising, is a far cry from saying they were in a dream like state. It would require a steady flow of delta waves for that. Not single bursts. 

It's intense at certain points. The five minute mark for instance. More like REM sleep, interestingly people who reported heavy REM activity are the majority of NDE claimants. 

On 5/7/2022 at 8:02 PM, preacherman76 said:

I also find it very strange that this has not been explored further. This should have been a very big deal. Why has no one picked up the torch? 

That's what the rat and pig experiments are. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/7/2022 at 9:00 PM, preacherman76 said:

Also I’d like to add, and I know this is pretty much impossible to explore, but why are so many NDE’s follow a pattern? With different reactions, categorically there seem to be three phases of the NDE. Often people start out in what they describe as a void. A place of total darkness. Some find it peaceful, some find it terrifying. The other starting phase is the typical out of body experience. Seeing their bodies, and usually feel indifferent to it. Likes they feel it’s no longer needed. The sensation of floating, and or the ability to move around the room, or even leave the room. Many times the experience ends there. They are revived. 
 

For those who go further, wether in that void or having an out of body experience, they usually see a light way off in the distance. The light then expands and gets closer till they are surrounded by it, turning it into a tunnel around them which they are being propelled through. Strong feelings of moving at an incredible speed. 
 

At the end of that tunnel, they begin to see what some would describe as celestial beings of light, and or, people they knew on earth who have died before them. They feel a overwhelming feeling of acceptance, of unconditional love. They move on from there to have a full life review, where they are not judged by those around them, but are helped by them as they judge themselves. Describe feeling everyone’s experience around them in any given part of the review. What it was like to be hurt by there actions or words. This is often overwhelming. 
 

Then usually by a family member, or some even describe by a God like figure are told they have to return. They usually protest, to no avail. 
 

There are millions of these cases, going back all through history and all over the world. I say all this so folks can get a good understanding of how complicated and profound these experiences are. Most are permanently changed following these experiences. 
 

Cultural expectations along with a common brain death sequence. I'd say it indicates that all brains go through the same thing during shutdown. If you are told to expect something your whole life, and believe it, them your brain will produce it. 

About 17% of people who nearly die report an NDE. If NDE is continuation of consciousness, that number should be higher. 

On 5/7/2022 at 9:00 PM, preacherman76 said:

A few delta busts recorded after clinical death in no way can explain this. Nor does it even begin to explain why all these people have such similar experiences. 

Cultural expectations definitely illustrate commonality. 

Why can't delta waves produce such a phenomenon in 17% of people on average?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/7/2022 at 9:36 PM, preacherman76 said:

Really when you think about it, if you could confirm even two experiences from different people who don’t know each other that went for better or worse how I described above, it should be considered astonishing. Impossible even. 

I can't see how. If you expect your life to drain a certain way, there's no reason the brain wouldn't simulate just that. 

Like when you dream about your day. It's not something one intends to do. 

On 5/7/2022 at 9:36 PM, preacherman76 said:

There are hundreds of thousands of these cases recorded, even long before internet days. As it’s completely dismissed. 

I've just proven it's not dismissed. There are plenty of current experiments, as well as ones that go back to the early 1900s 

Sadly all that information is generally dismissed for an optimistic outlook. Some idiots are still proposing dualism. How can the subject be taken seriously with clowns like that convoluting the path? 

Death isn't a mystery. It's just another study. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/7/2022 at 7:58 PM, openozy said:

Yep, superstition is generally silly except for walking under ladders which is occupational safety :tu:

Great post, this thread needed a little humor injected into it!:D

Hope you and yours are well my friend!:tu:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, psyche101 said:

 

About 17% of people who nearly die report an NDE. If NDE is continuation of consciousness, that number should be higher. 

17% is a big number though. The rest may have not crossed far enough to experience this. I don't think you could call it consciousness if you are clinically dead.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Great post, this thread needed a little humor injected into it!:D

Hope you and yours are well my friend!:tu:

Hey bro good to see you. Been wondering where you have been.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, openozy said:

17% is a big number though. The rest may have not crossed far enough to experience this.

83% is much bigger. 

Isn't it more interesting that the majority of those 17% are reporting regular REM activity? Which are the same waves seen in death?

29 minutes ago, openozy said:

I don't think you could call it consciousness if you are clinically dead.

That's what afterlife proponents are proposing though. Like simply stepping or floating out of your body. Just a transition.

It's more likely that senses are recording sounds. I was thinking this during my own investigations when learning hearing was the last sense to go. 

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200708105935.htm

 

Date:

July 8, 2020

Source:

University of British Columbia

Summary:

Hearing is widely thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process. Now, the first study to investigate hearing in palliative care patients who are close to death provides evidence that some may still be able to hear while in an unresponsive state. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to measure the dying brain's response to sound. The findings may help family and friends bring comfort to a person in their final moments.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, psyche101 said:

Hey bro good to see you. Been wondering where you have been.

I been busy with life, I don’t know how much longer I will be back though.

Hope you and your family are doing well my friend!:tu:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, psyche101 said:

sn't it more interesting that the majority of those 17% are reporting regular REM activity

It is interesting and I know two people brought back from being clinically dead, they both said there was nothing but blackness. I still don't think they were dead long enough to experience what came after though.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, openozy said:

It is interesting and I know two people brought back from being clinically dead, they both said there was nothing but blackness. I still don't think they were dead long enough to experience what came after though.

Everybody I know has said that. My brother passed away a couple Xmases ago and he had a heart attack about 12 months prior to his passing. He was actually rather scared to find there was nothing at all. He was religious to an extent, not a crazy but definitely a believer. 

A poster here Dany also reported nothing. I think it's more people who are likely to survive a nasty brush with death that tend to have these experiences. I personally theorise that it's like being woken in am intense dream during REM activity. An interruption of the death process. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

I been busy with life, I don’t know how much longer I will be back though.

Hope you and your family are doing well my friend!:tu:

Good the hear all is well. All the best bro. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, psyche101 said:

I personally theorise that it's like being woken in am intense dream during REM activity. An interruption of the death process. 

Two things come to mind.  First, my conversation with my daughter Sunday about the experience of 'your entire life flashing all at once right before your eyes'...when something dramatically life changing happens...my experience was back in the 80s when I drove off a road into the field several feet below.  My Ford LTD actually went airborne for about 1/2 a second.  But in that half a second, my entire life did actually flash before my eyes...it is a really strange experience.

Secondly, a thread I visited the other day where memory editing was being discussed.   Losing consciousness to the point of one's heart stopping it's beat is definitely a life changing occurrence.   It is also a dramatic life changing experience when one's heart begins beating again...stale blood, freshly oxygenated being pumped back into an oxygen starved brain.  Good Lord only knows what kind of brain activity happens when that occurs.  But, I think we do have a bit of knowledge concerning exactly that...hallucinations, remembering things we shouldn't even be aware of...etc.

Any vision or remembering of anything immediately upon regaining consciousness therefore has to be considered part of the regaining consciousness occurrence, and not the complete loss of memory occurrence.  What people think is that they remember something that happened while they were unconscious...but it is actually part of the experience of regaining consciousness.

All that to say...there is no life after death...and being kind of dead but not really doesn't count as being dead.  Although it is an interesting thing to happen.  My best friend died over 15 years ago...he isn't going to suddenly come back to life.  

There is no veil of the shadow of being in between life and death...there is only hallucination and false memories.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.