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Guns now leading cause of death among children and teenagers in US, data suggests


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Firearms are now the leading cause of death among children and teenagers in the United States, figures suggest.

More people aged one to 19 died from gun-related injuries in 2020 than in vehicle crashes or drugs overdoses, according to analysis of federal data by researchers at the University of Michigan.

More than 4,300 died of firearm-related injuries that year - a 29% increase from 2019, they found - based on their analysis of mortality data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The figure includes suicides, homicides and unintentional deaths.

https://news.sky.com/story/guns-now-leading-cause-of-death-among-children-and-teenagers-in-us-data-suggests-12595878

An article detailing the researchers' findings has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2201761

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Gee if only there was a solution we could use that literally every other developed country on earth has done which completely solves this particular problem...

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Gun confiscation would be as unsuccessful as The War on Drugs which began in 1971. It’s been 52 years, yet drug abuse and drug overdoses continue virtually unimpeded. The paramilitary drug cartels operating on our Southern border can easily arm their associates in the US, just as they now supply their drug distributors.
 

 

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1 hour ago, simplybill said:

Gun confiscation would be as unsuccessful as The War on Drugs which began in 1971. It’s been 52 years, yet drug abuse and drug overdoses continue virtually unimpeded. The paramilitary drug cartels operating on our Southern border can easily arm their associates in the US, just as they now supply their drug distributors.
 

 

Except it worked /literally everywhere it was tried/. The drug war didn't. 

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2 hours ago, Autochthon1990 said:

Gee if only there was a solution we could use that literally every other developed country on earth has done which completely solves this particular problem...

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/nearly-1-300-kids-killed-guns-each-year-study-finds-n774086

Quote

“African American children have the highest rates of firearm mortality overall,” they wrote. Black children are 10 times more likely to be killed by guns than white children, they found.

Do away with the black ghetto culture and rates will drop. Remove the statistics of major democrat stronghold cities and watch the numbers drop.

Yes and your going to read it again. Guns don't kill people, people kill people.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Autochthon1990 said:

Except it worked /literally everywhere it was tried/. The drug war didn't. 

It depends on which gun control tactics are used. Here in the US, for example, gun buybacks have no effect on gun violence statistics.

From CNN:

“Chicago officials annually take in hundreds of guns through buyback programs. But decades of research shows such programs don't reduce gun violence, in large part because they don't result in guns being taken from people who aren't supposed to have them. One recent study found "no evidence that (gun buyback programs) reduce suicides or homicides where a firearm was involved."

https://www.cnn.com/2022/04/16/us/chicago-gun-buybacks/index.html

Edited by simplybill
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From a uni that must've studied with those Stanford brains that said they could find no evidence that guns offer any protection.

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2 hours ago, simplybill said:

Gun confiscation would be as unsuccessful as The War on Drugs which began in 1971. It’s been 52 years, yet drug abuse and drug overdoses continue virtually unimpeded. The paramilitary drug cartels operating on our Southern border can easily arm their associates in the US, just as they now supply their drug distributors.
 

Name any other places where that has ACTUALLY happened. Drugs and firearms are, market wise, as similar as chalk and cheese.

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37 minutes ago, ethereal_scout said:

Name any other places where that has ACTUALLY happened. Drugs and firearms are, market wise, as similar as chalk and cheese.

I’m not sure what you’re asking. 
My responses are in reply to the first sentence of the opening post:

“Firearms are now the leading cause of death among children and teenagers in the United States, figures suggest.”

Guns and drugs are intrinsically woven together in illegal drug production and distribution. I suspect that a major contributor to increased gun deaths among children and teenagers is the use of minors to transport illegal drugs. Minors rarely receive harsh sentences for drug crimes, whereas adults are given mandatory minimum sentences. Increasing the number of gang-associated minors in areas prone to turf wars will of course lead to higher numbers of casualties among minors.

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4 hours ago, Autochthon1990 said:

Gee if only there was a solution we could use that literally every other developed country on earth has done which completely solves this particular problem...

Gee if only they would enforce the current gun laws/terroristic threatening laws we already have, maybe we would have less problems. No good passing more laws in they're not gonna enforce current laws and fix mental health care.

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53 minutes ago, Gunn said:

fix mental health care.

Oh?  I'd love to hear your ideas on that.  

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Gang culture has gotten so bad in most major cities, this was inevitable. 

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6 minutes ago, Agent0range said:

Oh?  I'd love to hear your ideas on that.  

What? C'mon man, you've been here long enough that I know you've read at least one of my past posts on that subject. If you got something to say about what I said in the past about it, quite digging at me and just say it dude. You don't agree it needs to be fixed? You do agree it needs to be fixed? What's your opinion?

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8 minutes ago, Gunn said:

What? C'mon man, you've been here long enough that I know you've read at least one of my past posts on that subject. If you got something to say about what I said in the past about it, quite digging at me and just say it dude. You don't agree it needs to be fixed? You do agree it needs to be fixed? What's your opinion?

Yea, universal healthcare.

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4 minutes ago, Agent0range said:

Yea, universal healthcare.

If that gets people affordable mental health care, I'm all for it. It's a start. And I think we need to bring back the mental asylums while we're at it. Instead of putting nutcases in prisons. Of course this time, we would we need to have a third independent organization to conduct oversight and make sure people are not being admitted to mental facilities only to be gotten rid of. It's not going to work if they don't do that.

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35 minutes ago, Agent0range said:

Oh?  I'd love to hear your ideas on that.  

Spend more money on it, spend money on destigmatising getting mental health care, make it easier to access and prevent price gouging on the part of private contractors in the mental health care industry so more people can acces it. 

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6 hours ago, Autochthon1990 said:

Gee if only there was a solution we could use that literally every other developed country on earth has done which completely solves this particular problem...

It’s not that easy - you have a culture of gun fetishisation (for want of a better word). Whereas they were seen as tools here in Oz, they are part of your founding mythos. You can replace a tool with something else, but a totem of your entire national foundation? Bloody hard.

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12 minutes ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Spend more money on it, spend money on destigmatising getting mental health care, make it easier to access and prevent price gouging on the part of private contractors in the mental health care industry so more people can acces it. 

Private contractors?  I don't know how it works over there but private contract mental health workers are rare in the state and federal government.  And the ones that do work for the government don't set their own price.  But one can not just go to a state or federal facility and get standard mental health care.  Can you walk in a hospital and get yourself committed?  Sure..but therapy is not an option without a high cost.  The only way to fix that, is to have universal healthcare.  You can't tell a college graduate with $250,000 in student loans that they can't charge $100 an hour for their services...

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1 hour ago, preacherman76 said:

Gang culture has gotten so bad in most major cities, this was inevitable. 

Suicide, homicide, unintentional, and undetermined is what the article said.  It would be interesting to know how much a rise in gang violence drove that number.

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1 hour ago, Gunn said:

f that gets people affordable mental health care, I'm all for it. It's a start. And I think we need to bring back the mental asylums while we're at it. Instead of putting nutcases in prisons. Of course this time, we would we need to have a third independent organization to conduct oversight and make sure people are not being admitted to mental facilities only to be gotten rid of. It's not going to work if they don't do that.

Yeah, there are some non-violent but nevertheless mentally incompetent people that wind up on the street because there is no current recourse other than street or prison. It would be good for society too and much cheaper than what we are currently doing.

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2 hours ago, Agent0range said:

Oh?  I'd love to hear your ideas on that.  

Pay someone $300,000 for mental injury and it's too much.

It augurs well for a solution.

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57 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Yeah, there are some non-violent but nevertheless mentally incompetent people that wind up on the street because there is no current recourse other than street or prison. It would be good for society too and much cheaper than what we are currently doing.

Hi Tate

We have our fair share of homeless here and some of them that should be living in council won't because they are not doing the drugs that they are prescribed and are doing street drugs. Have wondered if giving them a facility where they got stoned and could spend the time watching tv, free meals and a mat on the floor would be motivation enough. I think in some way that if they are given clean drugs and are monitored will self help/life skills coaching on a volunteer basis so that it is a choice might help. They don't have to scam or steal to get drugs or food so certain behaviors may be less expressed and others explored you can't help people that do not want it nor can you force anyone to do what's best for them and are left with lock them up if they get caught breaking a serious enough crime.

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3 hours ago, Agent0range said:

Private contractors?  I don't know how it works over there but private contract mental health workers are rare in the state and federal government.  And the ones that do work for the government don't set their own price.  But one can not just go to a state or federal facility and get standard mental health care.  Can you walk in a hospital and get yourself committed?  Sure..but therapy is not an option without a high cost.  The only way to fix that, is to have universal healthcare.  You can't tell a college graduate with $250,000 in student loans that they can't charge $100 an hour for their services...

Ohh now here’s a thought - ditch the student debt*. Last time we did that tax revenue jumped above and beyond that of the price of paying for the government covering uni fees
 

 

 

 

*government paid for uni degrees 

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1 minute ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Ohh now here’s a thought - ditch the student debt*. Last time we did that tax revenue jumped above and beyond that of the price of paying for the government covering uni fees
 

 

 

 

*government paid for uni degrees 

Yea...the right would never go for that...

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6 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Suicide, homicide, unintentional, and undetermined is what the article said.  It would be interesting to know how much a rise in gang violence drove that number.

You gotta read between the lines. This is 10 more likely to happen to a black kid then a white one, as another poster pointed out. 

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