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Ukrainian Army captures hundreds of Russian vehicles and tanks


Manwon Lender
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Ukrainian Soldiers reportedly captured hundreds of Russian combat vehicles, including T-90 main battle tanks, 2S19 Msta-S self-propelled howitzers, Lynx and Typhoon armoured vehicles. 

What was striking was that the Russian military abandons even their most advanced and combat-ready air defense systems at the sight of Ukrainian drones and aircraft. Over the past few days, the Ukrainian Army strikes or captured Tor-M2 surface-to-air missile systems, Pantsir-S1 self-propelled anti-aircraft gun and missile (SPAAGM) systems, Buk-M1 surface-to-air missile systems. As Oryx Blog previously reported, Russia already lost 353 combat vehicles and aircraft, of which: destroyed – 154, damaged – 8, abandoned – 82, captured – 107.

https://defence-blog.com/ukrainian-army-captures-hundreds-of-russian-vehicles-and-tanks/

Update: Ukrainian forces successfully thwarted the Russian battalion’s river crossing and destroys at least 70 military vehicles.

Ukraine’s military released drone images on May 12 showing the remains of two pontoon bridges with ruins of 73 main battle tanks and armoured vehicles in the Siverskyi Donets River, in the Luhansk region. Images show a bridge was completely destroyed along with dozens of Russian vehicles, inflicting heavy casualties.

 

 

https://defence-blog.com/ukrainian-forces-destroy-columns-of-russian-armoured-vehicles-in-luhansk-region/


 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The Russian army that invaded Ukraine was overwhelmingly made up of peacetime soldiers, taught to follow orders on the parade ground, but clueless on the battlefield. They didn't even know they were going to war. It was just a special operation in the good old Ukraine, mostly Russian speaking, where the girls were awesome. Then the shooting began. They were worse off, even  than the peacetime occupation troops rushed to Pusan, Korea from Japan in 1950 as a stopgap measure to slow the North Korean armored juggernaut. At least they were better trained and knew they were going into combat, ill-prepared for it though they were. The Russian soldiers were green, poorly led--no NCOs and no Comisars, anymore, to "inspire" the men.  Ancient, nonfunctioning communication equipment resulted in commercial substitutes and unencrypted messaging on open channels and cell phones. Generals had to go to the front to make sure their orders were not intercepted, understood and carried out. That's why there have been so many generals and other senior command officers killed. If the Ukrainians mount a sustained, combined arms offensive, they'll roll the Russian army up like a rug.

Edited by Hammerclaw
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51 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

The Russian army that invaded Ukraine was overwhelmingly made up of peacetime soldiers, taught to follow orders on the parade ground, but clueless on the battlefield. They didn't even know they were going to war. It was just a special operation in the good old Ukraine, mostly Russian speaking, where the girls were awesome. Then the shooting began. They were worse off, even  than the peacetime occupation troops rushed to Pusan, Korea from Japan in 1950 as a stopgap measure to slow the North Korean armored juggernaut. At least they were better trained and knew they were going into combat, ill-prepared for it though they were. The Russian soldiers were green, poorly led--no NCOs and no Comisars, anymore, to "inspire" the men.  Ancient, nonfunctioning communication equipment resulted in commercial substitutes and unencrypted messaging on open channels and cell phones. Generals had to go to the front to make sure their orders were not intercepted, understood and carried out. That's why there have been so many generals and other senior command officers killed. If the Ukrainians mount a sustained, combined arms offensive, they'll roll the Russian army up like a rug.

Life’s a b**** if your a Russian Soldier involved in the Ukrainian Invasion, and there is no doubt that Putin is pouting. While it certainly appears your right about the quality of the Russian forces used in the invasion, their General Staff made some serious mistakes I can’t fathom. This entire invasion in every detail has been a fiasco, from logistics to all forms of planning, and Putins delusional belief that the Ukraine would fall apart like the Crimea is the root cause of this disaster. In addition to Putins mistaken belief that the EU, NATO and the United States would just sit back happen.

Putin has placed himself in a no win situation, and the humiliation that will follow. The best the Russians can hope for is a cease fire that will allow an orderly withdrawal back to Russia. At this point l don’t believe that Russia can regain momentum in their invasion, I could certainly be wrong but without the intervention of comrade China which I don’t believe will happen I can not see anyway they can save any face!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Manwon Lender said:

Life’s a b**** if your a Russian Soldier involved in the Ukrainian Invasion, and there is no doubt that Putin is pouting. While it certainly appears your right about the quality of the Russian forces used in the invasion, their General Staff made some serious mistakes I can’t fathom. This entire invasion in every detail has been a fiasco, from logistics to all forms of planning, and Putins delusional belief that the Ukraine would fall apart like the Crimea is the root cause of this disaster. In addition to Putins mistaken belief that the EU, NATO and the United States would just sit back happen.

Putin has placed himself in a no win situation, and the humiliation that will follow. The best the Russians can hope for is a cease fire that will allow an orderly withdrawal back to Russia. At this point l don’t believe that Russia can regain momentum in their invasion, I could certainly be wrong but without the intervention of comrade China which I don’t believe will happen I can not see anyway they can save any face!

There was no plan, no overall strategy for the invasion, at all. Even the generals had less than 24 hours warning the invasion was on. Most of the top brass thought Putin was bluffing, a-gain. He wasn't. His intelligence personnel had assured him that after the initial "shock and awe" attack on Ukrainian military infrastructure, equipment and munitions, all they had to do is roll down to Kiev, seize the government and install a puppet regime and game over. Well, his "military intelligence" either failed to understand incipient Ukrainian nationalism, the sophisticated training for 8 years in western asymmetric warfare tactics, the art of retreat and individual initiative, or were afraid to tell him anything he didn't want to hear. So, the young naive conscripts who poured over the border with visions of Ukraine babes, dancing in their heads, basically, rolled into a slaughter. Cold war equipment, training and tactics ran head on into cutting edge tactics and sophisticated platoon level ordinance. The Russian army is procedure oriented with a top-down hierarchy where individual initiative is frowned on. The modern Ukrainian army is goal oriented with flexible tactics and lots of individual initiative i.e. whatever gets the job done. The Russian army can't operate more that about a hundred klicks from a railway terminal. The logistics tail hasn't enough trucks. Most of their wheeled vehicles weren't properly maintained, fired up and rotated when stored outside. The consequence was one side would have sun-rot in their cheap Chinese tires and would wind up all blown out on that side and then abandoned. The tanks ran out of gas and the Russians don't have anywhere near the number of fuel trucks necessary to supply that size force in the field. That railway terminal limitation bit them in the backside, big time.

Edited by Hammerclaw
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1 hour ago, Hammerclaw said:

There was no plan, no overall strategy for the invasion, at all. Even the generals had less than 24 hours warning the invasion was on. Most of the top brass thought Putin was bluffing, a-gain. He wasn't. His intelligence personnel had assured him that after the initial "shock and awe" attack on Ukrainian military infrastructure, equipment and munitions, all they had to do is roll down to Kiev, seize the government and install a puppet regime and game over. Well, his "military intelligence" either failed to understand incipient Ukrainian nationalism, the sophisticated training for 8 years in western asymmetric warfare tactics, the art of retreat and individual initiative, or were afraid to tell him anything he didn't want to hear. So, the young naive conscripts who poured over the border with visions of Ukraine babes, dancing in their heads, basically, rolled into a slaughter. Cold war equipment, training and tactics ran head on into cutting edge tactics and sophisticated platoon level ordinance. The Russian army is procedure oriented with a top-down hierarchy where individual initiative is frowned on. The modern Ukrainian army is goal oriented with flexible tactics and lots of individual initiative i.e. whatever gets the job done. The Russian army can't operate more that about a hundred klicks from a railway terminal. The logistics tail hasn't enough trucks. Most of their wheeled vehicles weren't properly maintained, fired up and rotated when stored outside. The consequence was one side would have sun-rot in their cheap Chinese tires and would wind up all blown out on that side and then abandoned. The tanks ran out of gas and the Russians don't have anywhere near the number of fuel trucks necessary to supply that size force in the field. That railway terminal limitation bit them in the backside, big time.

It seems amazing to me that this occurred, when I was working as Contractor in Syria in 2017 and 2018 the Russians had none of these problems. Their soldiers were top notch, and they had no obvious logistical issues to speak of. One thing I don’t agree with the above is that they were not using Cold War equipment, I started a thread here today on the total loss of Russian Equipment destroyed, abandoned and captured. Much of the equipment was their top line equipment.

I became familiar with their equipment in Syria, and I went through the files in the link below where every vehicle is listed and ever vehicle has a picture included all 3623 of them. In my opinion the difference between the Ukrainian and Russian military is the Russian soldiers in reality have nothing to fight for, and the Ukrainian Soldiers are fighting for the freedom of their people and their Nation. I have seen over the years especially with the Kurds, where smaller but well equipped forces can destroy larger forces to protect their loved ones.

I would appreciate it if you would share some of your sources with me, I have been trying to find as much information as I can and the information your sharing is better in some areas that what I have been able to find.

Thanks for sharing I have enjoyed the conversation very much.

 

Russia total of  3623 pieces lost of which the following were destroyed: 2006, damaged: 71, abandoned: 273, captured: 1273

 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/13/2022 at 6:39 AM, Manwon Lender said:

It seems amazing to me that this occurred, when I was working as Contractor in Syria in 2017 and 2018 the Russians had none of these problems. Their soldiers were top notch, and they had no obvious logistical issues to speak of. One thing I don’t agree with the above is that they were not using Cold War equipment, I started a thread here today on the total loss of Russian Equipment destroyed, abandoned and captured. Much of the equipment was their top line equipment.

I became familiar with their equipment in Syria, and I went through the files in the link below where every vehicle is listed and ever vehicle has a picture included all 3623 of them. In my opinion the difference between the Ukrainian and Russian military is the Russian soldiers in reality have nothing to fight for, and the Ukrainian Soldiers are fighting for the freedom of their people and their Nation. I have seen over the years especially with the Kurds, where smaller but well equipped forces can destroy larger forces to protect their loved ones.

I would appreciate it if you would share some of your sources with me, I have been trying to find as much information as I can and the information your sharing is better in some areas that what I have been able to find.

Thanks for sharing I have enjoyed the conversation very much.

 

Russia total of  3623 pieces lost of which the following were destroyed: 2006, damaged: 71, abandoned: 273, captured: 1273

 

My understanding from multiple sources is--that while Russia has some new ordinance and vehicles, much of even it is upgraded older designs. Personal night vision equipment is at a premium and Russian forces are loath to engage in night actions. Most Russian personal arms are iron sights, only. There are no NCOs in the Russian army. Russian soldiers are required to obey the last order received from their officers, hours or days after such commands may be no longer applicable to the present situation. Only where their forces are dug in and stationary is their command structure somewhat effective. In essence, they are immobilized while the Ukrainians own the night and roam where they will.

Russian People Surprised to Find Out Ukraine War Not Going Well on State TV (newsweek.com)

Russia Sends Most Advanced Tanks to Ukraine in Bid to Turn the Tide of War (newsweek.com)

Edited by Hammerclaw
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Fantastic stuff. Ukraine is doing far, far better then anybody ever expected. I'm quite glad to see my tax dollars going to support such a cause, and wish them nothing but the best on getting rid of the invaders. Hopefully EU membership will follow once they're gone with their own version of the Marshall Plan to repair as much damage as possible. They can't bring back the lives lost, but they can at least ensure their sacrifice wasn't in vain. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Autochthon1990 said:

Fantastic stuff. Ukraine is doing far, far better then anybody ever expected. I'm quite glad to see my tax dollars going to support such a cause, and wish them nothing but the best on getting rid of the invaders. Hopefully EU membership will follow once they're gone with their own version of the Marshall Plan to repair as much damage as possible. They can't bring back the lives lost, but they can at least ensure their sacrifice wasn't in vain. 

I am with you completely Auto, this is wonderful.  Long term this is great , because it it destroys the myth of Russian in invincibility. If things don’t change the Ukraine is going to be another Afghanistan and Putin allow tha to happen.:tu:

 

Edited by Manwon Lender
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In addition, if Sweden and Finland join NATO, the alliance will be even stronger.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

My understanding from multiple sources is--that while Russia has some new ordinance and vehicles, much of even it is upgraded older designs. Personal night vision equipment is at a premium and Russian forces are loath to engage in night actions. Most Russian personal arms are iron sights, only. There are no NCOs in the Russian army. Russian soldiers are required to obey the last order received from their officers, hours or days after such commands may be no longer applicable to the present situation. Only where their forces are dug in and stationary is their command structure somewhat effective. In essence, they are immobilized while the Ukrainians own the night and roam where they will.

Russian People Surprised to Find Out Ukraine War Not Going Well on State TV (newsweek.com)

Russia Sends Most Advanced Tanks to Ukraine in Bid to Turn the Tide of War (newsweek.com)

Man you make some great points especially the fact that the Russian military , does  not have an NCO Corp’S.

Edited by Manwon Lender
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7 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

Man you make some great points especially the fact that the Russian military , does  not have an NCO Corp’S.

Just a gestalt armchair summation of everything I've read. The Russians seem to have overran most of the territory they've seized in the initial phase of their "special operation". Once the Ukrainians recovered from the shock and mounted an effective defense their territorial aspirations have been, for the most part, stymied. The Russians want to use their forces like a sledge hammer and crush Ukrainian resistance. Instead, they are suffering a death of a thousand cuts from the asymmetric warfare tactics employed by the Ukrainians which they were tutored in by the US and NATO. Much to the chagrin of the Russians, tanks are proving to be dinosaurs on the battlefield as wielded by the Russians; cold war relics, new though some may be, employed with obsolete tactics. You'd think they'd have learned the lesson they taught the Israelis through the Egyptians in the Sinai in '73. Armor, without sufficient infantry support, is sitting ducks for enemy infantry armed with effective antiarmor weaponry.

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12 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

Just a gestalt armchair summation of everything I've read. The Russians seem to have overran most of the territory they've seized in the initial phase of their "special operation". Once the Ukrainians recovered from the shock and mounted an effective defense their territorial aspirations have been, for the most part, stymied. The Russians want to use their forces like a sledge hammer and crush Ukrainian resistance. Instead, they are suffering a death of a thousand cuts from the asymmetric warfare tactics employed by the Ukrainians which they were tutored in by the US and NATO. Much to the chagrin of the Russians, tanks are proving to be dinosaurs on the battlefield as wielded by the Russians; cold war relics, new though some may be, employed with obsolete tactics. You'd think they'd have learned the lesson they taught the Israelis through the Egyptians in the Sinai in '73. Armor, without sufficient infantry support, is sitting ducks for enemy infantry armed with effective antiarmor weaponry.

Well overall for someone who never served in the Military, you tactical knowledge is great, w very refreshing to be honest

Don’t know how much longer I will be here, hope your well my friend 

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2 hours ago, Manwon Lender said:

Well overall for someone who never served in the Military, you tactical knowledge is great, w very refreshing to be honest

Don’t know how much longer I will be here, hope your well my friend 

I hope you are well and with us, always. You can credit my tactical knowledge to James F. Dunnigan, military-political analyst and Defense and State Department consultant. 

In college and afterwards he created and/or published wargames for Avalon hill and his own company, Simulation Publications Inc. I belonged to a wargame club in the '70s, long before the PC and became firmly grounded in tactical knowledge and strategy. 

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Commercial DJI drone and a mortar in a garden:

 

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