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Extraterrestrial stone brings first supernova clues to Earth


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

New chemistry "forensics" indicate that the stone named Hypatia from the Egyptian desert could be the first tangible evidence found on Earth of a supernova type Ia explosion. These rare supernovas are some of the most energetic events in the universe.

This is the conclusion from a new study published in the journal Icarus, by Jan Kramers, Georgy Belyanin and Hartmut Winkler of the University of Johannesburg, and others.

Since 2013, Belyanin and Kramers have been uncovering a series of highly unusual chemistry clues in a small fragment of the Hypatia Stone. In their new research, they eliminate "cosmic suspects" for the origin of the stone in a painstaking process. They have pieced together a timeline stretching back to the early stages of the formation of Earth, our sun and the other planets in our solar system.

https://phys.org/news/2022-05-extraterrestrial-stone-supernova-clues-earth.html

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103522001555?

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Posted (edited)

A rare stone found in the Egyptian desert, named 'Hypatia' is believed to have formed before our very own solar system and could shed light on the mysteries of our universe. Space is odd, weird, and fascinating. We all have at least once in a life dreamt of going to space, but we forget we are traveling in space all the time, on a giant rock that sort of looks like a ball. The True Spaceball! Though this rock was formed four and half billion years ago, space didn’t stop contributing to it. A strange extraterrestrial space rock unearthed in the Sahara Desert is an unexpected gift from the universe that we have unwrapped millions of years after its delivery, and could be the first evidence on Earth for a rare type of supernova.

 

 

Edited by Abramelin
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