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Mysterious lake inexplicably replenishes its freshwater without a source


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Hypothesis: Fairies. Fairies replenish the water.

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Confession: I really, really, and I mean really had to go bad. I feel better now.:tu:

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A quite similar to the Fosse Dionne in France. For centuries, people have relied on the gushing, colour-changing waters of this ancient well – but no-one has ever been able to locate its source.

In the heart of France’s idyllic Burgundy region, surrounded by manicured vineyards, fortified Renaissance chateaux and medieval hill towns, sits one of the bucolic area’s most mysterious attractions: a seemingly bottomless spring-fed pit in the small town of Tonnarre known as the Fosse Dionne.

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20200730-the-fosse-dionne-frances-mysterious-underground-spring

 

The Fosse Dionne: France's mysterious underground spring - BBC Travel

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31 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

A quite similar to the Fosse Dionne in France. For centuries, people have relied on the gushing, colour-changing waters of this ancient well – but no-one has ever been able to locate its source.

In the heart of France’s idyllic Burgundy region, surrounded by manicured vineyards, fortified Renaissance chateaux and medieval hill towns, sits one of the bucolic area’s most mysterious attractions: a seemingly bottomless spring-fed pit in the small town of Tonnarre known as the Fosse Dionne.

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20200730-the-fosse-dionne-frances-mysterious-underground-spring

 

The Fosse Dionne: France's mysterious underground spring - BBC Travel


That's pretty. I should go there.

Though that just supports my hypothesis. The water fairy Melusine is associated with Burgundy.

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 What is really super amazing is that it never, ever, ever rains on that particular mountain. Ever!  Not a drop!

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Water pressure from bellow and spread throughout the base of the lake? I have no idea how geological processes go.

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Posted (edited)

There is obviously a “ source” of water, because, there is water in the lake.   If it doesn’t come from above, it comes from below?

Edited by lightly
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Dumn article title.  Of course there is a "source".   Probably springs.  

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Posted (edited)

Yup Abe, that’s undoubtedly the answer to the mystery. :P     Over most of the earth there is much more water underground, than above.    

Edited by lightly
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11 minutes ago, lightly said:

Yup Abe, that’s undoubtedly the answer to the mystery. :P     Over most of the earth there is much more water underground, than above.    

Blame gravity.

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That photo is NOT the lake they are speaking about. Not even close. It�s called � Lake on the Mountain�.
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Posted (edited)

Aquifer and rain...There's a lot of lakes without any spring or river coming in. Water just sip in underground. 

But you can have a pristine spring nearby:

CavernousPertinentAmericanavocet-max-1mb.gif.39116c2f392ddbe4b516a8283692e98b.gif

Edited by Jon the frog
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