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High Resolution Imaging Reveals Puzzling Features Deep in Earth’s Interior


Manwon Lender
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New research led by the University of Cambridge is the first to obtain a detailed ‘image’ of an unusual pocket of rock at the boundary layer with Earth’s core, some three thousand kilometers beneath the surface. The mysterious area of rock, which is located almost directly beneath

The research, published on May 19, 2022, in the journal Nature Communications, is the first to reveal the complex internal variability of one of these pockets in detail, shedding light on the landscape of Earth’s deep interior and the processes operating within it. the Hawaiian Islands, is one of several ultra-low velocity zones – so-called because earthquake waves slow to a crawl as they pass through them. 

https://scitechdaily.com/high-resolution-imaging-reveals-puzzling-features-deep-in-earths-interior/!

https://scitechdaily.com/high-resolution-imaging-reveals-puzzling-features-deep-in-earths-interior/:  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-30502-5

 

 

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I'm curious, and didn't see this addressed in the article, would this low velocity zone make earthquakes weaker or stronger than they otherwise would be in the area they are under?  Maybe neither and I'm just barking up the wrong tree entirely.

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3 hours ago, OverSword said:

I'm curious, and didn't see this addressed in the article, would this low velocity zone make earthquakes weaker or stronger than they otherwise would be in the area they are under?  Maybe neither and I'm just barking up the wrong tree entirely.

I also was unable to find anything. I even looked online but no luck sorry man!:tu:

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, OverSword said:

I'm curious, and didn't see this addressed in the article, would this low velocity zone make earthquakes weaker or stronger than they otherwise would be in the area they are under?  Maybe neither and I'm just barking up the wrong tree entirely.

It seems to me that they would be weaker.  Just generally speaking, if you shook a bush gently, i.e. Low Speed, you might shake off a leaf or two, but if you shook the bush violently, i.e. High Speed then you would cause more damage to the bush.  But also Earth Quakes are caused by a collision of tectonic plates (if I remember correctly) and the Earth's core is molten iron/metal.  There must be incredible pressure at the core of the Earth to push that molten iron up to the surface...but once the core metals are at the surface and cool, then they would be much harder to displace by say, an Earthquake.  Just me thinking out loud.

Edited by joc
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12 hours ago, OverSword said:

I'm curious, and didn't see this addressed in the article, would this low velocity zone make earthquakes weaker or stronger than they otherwise would be in the area they are under?  Maybe neither and I'm just barking up the wrong tree entirely.

The features discussed in the article are very deep and close to the Earth core boundary. 

The speed at which waves pass through this region would probably have negligible impact at the surface ? 

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As an edit to my previous post I said Iron/metal....I meant to say iron/nickel molten core

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