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New discovery about distant galaxies: Stars are heavier than we thought


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

For as long as humans have studied the heavens, how stars look in distant galaxies has been a mystery. In a study published today in The Astrophysical Journal, a team of researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute is challenging previous understandings of stars beyond our own galaxy.

Since 1955, it has been assumed that the composition of stars in the universe's other galaxies is similar to that of the hundreds of billions of stars within our own—a mixture of massive, medium mass and low mass stars. But with the help of observations from 140,000 galaxies across the universe and a wide range of advanced models, the team has tested whether the same distribution of stars apparent in the Milky Way applies elsewhere. The answer is no. Stars in distant galaxies are typically more massive than those in our "local neighborhood." The finding has a major impact on what we think we know about the universe.

https://phys.org/news/2022-05-discovery-distant-galaxies-stars-heavier.html

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ac695e

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On 5/25/2022 at 10:08 PM, Still Waters said:

For as long as humans have studied the heavens, how stars look in distant galaxies has been a mystery. In a study published today in The Astrophysical Journal, a team of researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute is challenging previous understandings of stars beyond our own galaxy.

Since 1955, it has been assumed that the composition of stars in the universe's other galaxies is similar to that of the hundreds of billions of stars within our own—a mixture of massive, medium mass and low mass stars. But with the help of observations from 140,000 galaxies across the universe and a wide range of advanced models, the team has tested whether the same distribution of stars apparent in the Milky Way applies elsewhere. The answer is no. Stars in distant galaxies are typically more massive than those in our "local neighborhood." The finding has a major impact on what we think we know about the universe.

https://phys.org/news/2022-05-discovery-distant-galaxies-stars-heavier.html

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/ac695e

Gets rid of dark matter.

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