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The Success of Scotland and Wales's Mimimum Alcohol Price policy may be extended to England


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Posted (edited)

Overall, Prof Peter Anderson, from Newcastle University who led the research, said the findings showed "the introduction of a MUP in Scotland has made a significant impact on reducing alcohol levels, with a sustained drop in overall units bought by some of the highest-consuming households two years on".

He added: "We can now see that the introduction of a MUP in Wales at the beginning of March 2020 has had a similar impact to the one we saw in Scotland in 2018 and we hope to see a continued benefit."

He said MUP was an important step forward in addressing alcohol-related health problems and the social harm caused by over consumption.

Prof Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said: "This is powerful, real-world evidence of the success of minimum unit pricing as a harm reduction policy."

He called on the UK government to follow the lead of the devolved administrations in Scotland and Wales and introduce minimum pricing for England.

Minimum unit alcohol price has 'lasting impact' - BBC News

Edited by The Silver Shroud
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  • The title was changed to The Success of Scotland and Wales's Mimimum Alcohol Price policy may be extended to England
 

Success? I assume its been anything but.

But fascists are facists and birds of a feather flock together. 

On 6/9/2022 at 9:41 AM, The Silver Shroud said:

Prof Peter Anderson, from Newcastle University who led the research,

Yes, but who paid for it?

As much as I'm 'politically' opposed to such interventions it doesn't work.

All that an alcoholic on £150pw welfare does is eat less food. 

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2 hours ago, ethereal_scout said:

Success? I assume its been anything but.

But fascists are facists and birds of a feather flock together. 

Yes, but who paid for it?

As much as I'm 'politically' opposed to such interventions it doesn't work.

All that an alcoholic on £150pw welfare does is eat less food. 

The academic view is that increasing the price of alcohol reduces consumption:Pricing as a means of controlling alcohol consumption | British Medical Bulletin | Oxford Academic (oup.com)

But what do experts know, hey? 

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4 hours ago, The Silver Shroud said:

The academic view is that increasing the price of alcohol....

But what do experts know, hey? 

How to keep getting tax payer funding if they keep recommending increasing government powers and tax takes?

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11 minutes ago, Hugh Mungus said:

How to keep getting tax payer funding if they keep recommending increasing government powers and tax takes?

So what is the alternative? Give up scientific study and just go on the intuition and 'gut feeling' of people who have been educated in the University of Life? Of course governments fund studies, that's how we get knowledge about policies.

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Posted (edited)

Is there any data in this having an effect on addiction?

Quote

However, the exception to this was those in high-purchasing, low-income homes, who did not seem to change their habits.

Seems like it might just be wealthy and middle class families sticking to their budgets and buying less alcohol because it cost more. 

That dosen't necessarily mean this policy lowers addictions rates 

Edited by spartan max2
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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

Is there any data in this having an effect on addiction?

Seems like it might just be wealthy and middle class families sticking to their budgets and buying less alcohol because it cost more. 

That dosen't necessarily mean this policy lowers addictions rates 

I should imagine data is the point of the studies- that is the raison d'etre of science, rather than anecdotal evidence.

Though I take your point about addiction vs lifestyle. But even addicts have limits- if cigarettes went up to £40 per packet (political suicide I know)- there would be a lot of anguish, but cigarette smoking would end, for example.

It wouldn't be a bad thing if drinkers stopped getting drunk, anyway.

Edited by The Silver Shroud
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6 hours ago, The Silver Shroud said:

But even addicts have limits- if cigarettes went up to £40 per packet

THats because it become un-affordable to your average Joe - minimum alcohol pricing DOESN'T put it out of reach of your average alcoholic.

 

11 hours ago, The Silver Shroud said:

But what do experts know, hey? 

They're bought and sold like anyone else - its like Defense lawyers - so you want someone on side or don't you - you're paying for their profession services.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/9/2022 at 9:41 AM, The Silver Shroud said:

Overall, Prof Peter Anderson, from Newcastle University who led the research, said the findings showed "the introduction of a MUP in Scotland has made a significant impact on reducing alcohol levels, with a sustained drop in overall units bought by some of the highest-consuming households two years on".

He added: "We can now see that the introduction of a MUP in Wales at the beginning of March 2020 has had a similar impact to the one we saw in Scotland in 2018 and we hope to see a continued benefit."

He said MUP was an important step forward in addressing alcohol-related health problems and the social harm caused by over consumption.

Prof Sir Ian Gilmore, chair of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said: "This is powerful, real-world evidence of the success of minimum unit pricing as a harm reduction policy."

He called on the UK government to follow the lead of the devolved administrations in Scotland and Wales and introduce minimum pricing for England.

Minimum unit alcohol price has 'lasting impact' - BBC News

I dont think its right for the state to nanny the health of the population.

At the same time if someone knackers up their health from alcoholism I think they should be seen as waving their right to NHS treatment (except for perhaps pain relief while they go off on their way)

Edited by Cookie Monster
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Minimum alcohol price ‘causes poorest to cut back on food’ in Scotland

Some problem drinkers also reducing heating to afford rising alcohol costs, according to Public Health Scotland

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jun/07/minimum-alcohol-pricing-causes-poorest-cut-back-food-scotland

 

'No clear evidence minimum pricing reduced consumption among drinkers dependent on alcohol'

https://uk.style.yahoo.com/no-clear-evidence-minimum-pricing-040000468.html?

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1 hour ago, Eldorado said:

Minimum alcohol price ‘causes poorest to cut back on food’ in Scotland

Some problem drinkers also reducing heating to afford rising alcohol costs, according to Public Health Scotland

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jun/07/minimum-alcohol-pricing-causes-poorest-cut-back-food-scotland

 

'No clear evidence minimum pricing reduced consumption among drinkers dependent on alcohol'

https://uk.style.yahoo.com/no-clear-evidence-minimum-pricing-040000468.html?

I agree with you, Eldorado. I only started this thread because someone had started another to bash Nicola Sturgeon over this policy. I think generally price increases discourage use- I have noticed there are less cars on the roads in Dorset since petrol went up so much. But people can take or leave non-essential journeys. The point about addiction is that people can't take or leave their drug of choice. I was talking to some smokers in a smoking area recently, about the cost of tobacco- the consensus was that we just had to suck it up- if people were going to quit, they would have quit when it started costing £8 per day, so all making it £10 per day is increasing their hardship (and mine). Mind you, now my brand has gone up to £10.50, I shall make an effort to quit. 

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On 6/15/2022 at 9:37 PM, Cookie Monster said:

I dont think its right for the state to nanny the health of the population.

At the same time if someone knackers up their health from alcoholism I think they should be seen as waving their right to NHS treatment (except for perhaps pain relief while they go off on their way)

I sort of agree, but tobacco revenues bring in three times more than smokers cost the NHS. And if you want to exlude reckless people from the NHS, then you should also exclude people who ride horse and do extreme sports. Horse riding is I think the most dangerous hobby/sport in the UK (and I am a horse rider). 

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7 hours ago, The Silver Shroud said:

I sort of agree, but tobacco revenues bring in three times more than smokers cost the NHS. And if you want to exlude reckless people from the NHS, then you should also exclude people who ride horse and do extreme sports. Horse riding is I think the most dangerous hobby/sport in the UK (and I am a horse rider). 

What I said and what you said are some of the downsides of state healthcare.

My view is to privatise the NHS and to take a different approach to helping low income households with their medical care. In essence a Medicare Benefit. It should cover a list of conditions and illnesses, and should be based on a persons income level. Private hospitals should be unable to refuse patients on Medicare and be paid a set amount for each type of treatment determined by the state.

Not going onto the list should be self-inflicted health issues from obesity, smoking, drugs, dangerous past times, and criminal activities. 

 

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