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First ever prayer beads from medieval Britain discovered


Eldorado
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The first ever example of prayer beads from medieval Britain has been discovered on the island of Lindisfarne, one of Britain’s most historic ancient sites, to the excitement of archaeologists.

Dating from the 8th to 9th century AD, they were made from salmon vertebrae. With fish an important symbol of early Christianity, they were clustered around the neck of one of the earliest skeletons - possibly one of the monks buried within the famous early medieval monastery.

Archaeologists are seeking to unearth the lost history of Lindisfarne, also known as Holy Island, off the coast of Northumberland. It was established by the Kings of Northumbria in the 7th century as an important religious centre and became the scene of the first major Viking raid on Britain in the 8th century.

MSN

History Blog

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2 hours ago, Eldorado said:

The first ever example of prayer beads from medieval Britain has been discovered on the island of Lindisfarne, one of Britain’s most historic ancient sites, to the excitement of archaeologists.

Dating from the 8th to 9th century AD, they were made from salmon vertebrae. With fish an important symbol of early Christianity, they were clustered around the neck of one of the earliest skeletons - possibly one of the monks buried within the famous early medieval monastery.

Archaeologists are seeking to unearth the lost history of Lindisfarne, also known as Holy Island, off the coast of Northumberland. It was established by the Kings of Northumbria in the 7th century as an important religious centre and became the scene of the first major Viking raid on Britain in the 8th century.

MSN

History Blog

Nope. Often repeated, but wrong.

The first incursion was in the South, recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle a few years earlier, in 789, if I recall properly. Some Danes pulled up, brought stuff on land to trade, killed the King's tax man when they disagreed on fees, then b*****ed back off to Scandia. Can't get more Viking that that.

--Jaylemurph

 

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