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Tomb linked to King Arthur is set to be excavated


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The only link is the name, I think. The stone is est. about 6k years old, King Arthur lived (if he did live and was not a complete myth) in the 5th or 6th Century.

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17 hours ago, The Silver Shroud said:

The only link is the name, I think. The stone is est. about 6k years old, King Arthur lived (if he did live and was not a complete myth) in the 5th or 6th Century.

Hi Silver

Doesn't mean that it wasn't used later as a burial site it does say that the stone is engraved with Arthur's battle scene and that would have been done long after the stones were erected. Was kind of surprised that there was no mention of ground penetrating radar use to guild then in excavation or even if there is anything under ground.

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Some research and excavations around the Arthur's Stone was done last year:

Neolithic monument linked to King Arthur is older than Stonehenge

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/an-ancient-monument-associated-with-King-Arthur-is-Older-than-Stonehenge-180978541/

Arthur's Stone dates to around 3700 B.C.E., making it a millennium older than Stonehenge, which was constructed around 2500 B.C.E.

Per Atlas Obscura, the tomb consists of nine standing stones that support a 25-ton, 13- by 7-foot quartz capstone. As the statement notes, the site served as a source of inspiration for the Stone Table in C.S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia.

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I don't understand. Can't they scan what is in the ground before just digging? They have to already have an idea what they are looking for.
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My thinking exactly @Nnicolette

Ground penetrating radar is remarkably potent... but then they'd lose funding I guess, so bring in the shovels...

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On 7/7/2022 at 9:06 PM, quiXilver said:

My thinking exactly @Nnicolette

Ground penetrating radar is remarkably potent... but then they'd lose funding I guess, so bring in the shovels...

The technology, however, cannot pick up organic matter, meaning it will not be able to determine whether skeletal remains lie below. Over time, bones will absorb the minerals out of the soil and become very similar to the soil, said Steve Watson, owner of the Ontario-based Global GPR Services Inc. If it's a relatively new burial, a technician may be able to identify the bones or identify an object that looks like a bone within a couple of years of that object being buried, he said.  If you've got something that's 50, 60 years or 100 years or 200 years, you're not going to see the bones,

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ground-radar-technology-residential-school-remains-1.6049776

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