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Polish researcher solves mystery of Anonymous God of Palmyra


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

A Polish archaeologist has unlocked a 100-year-old mystery after identifying over 200 inscriptions addressed to an anonymous god.

Aleksandra Kubiak-Schneider had been carrying out research in an ancient metropolis in today’s Syria known as Palmyra when she made her discovery.

Among the approx. 2,500 inscriptions in Aramaic on various architectural elements scattered around Palmyra, she found about 200 texts dated mainly to the 2nd and 3rd century CE. All of them contained mysterious phrases in the form of addressing a deity: 'He whose name is blessed forever', 'Lord of the Universe', 'Merciful'.

https://scienceinpoland.pl/en/news/news%2C92637%2Cpolish-researcher-solves-mystery-anonymous-god-palmyra.html

Mysterious 'lord of the universe' deity from ancient Palmyra finally identified

https://www.livescience.com/ancient-palmyra-god-identified

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Great, another one for my Sky Gods collection, you can never have too many!
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I'm surprised they didn't include El Agabal, who Roman Emperor Elagabalus was the High Priest of and named himself after and was then worshiped as Sol Invictus by Constantine the Great.

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Ah well, I was hoping for a benevolent god who did nice things anonymously.  So many gods just do it to impress people and  collect followers.

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The two titles 'He whose name is blessed forever' and 'Lord of the Universe' could also be used as alternate translations for the title of Atum, the All Lord. Atum was the lord of all time from it's beginning to end, and lord of all that the Egyptians believed to exist, even if he did not create the basic underlying fabric of the universe, which in their view was the waters of Nun, created by Ptah. So this Palmyran god could be a fusion of two or more gods, and I'm not saying that it would be Atum and Ptah, but they had been around for thousands of years and would have been familiar all around the Levant, or, as this is Syria, a version of Elagabal, as Piney points out.

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16 hours ago, Piney said:

I'm surprised they didn't include El Agabal, who Roman Emperor Elagabalus was the High Priest of and named himself after and was then worshiped as Sol Invictus by Constantine the Great.

Heliogabalus knew how to party:

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Roses_of_Heliogabalus#/media/File%3AThe_Roses_of_Heliogabalus.jpg
 

Oppressit in tricliniis versatilibus parasitos suos violis et floribus, sic ut animam aliqui efflaverint, cum erepere ad summum non possent.

In a banqueting-room with a reversible ceiling he once buried his guests in violets and other flowers, so that some were actually smothered to death, being unable to crawl out to the top.

—Jaylemurph 

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