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Rediscovering The Sources Of Egyptian Metals


Thanos5150
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2018.

Rediscovering The Sources Of Egyptian Metals

From one of the studies:

Quote

The 22 artifacts show similar production technology, but diverse origins of the metal, including an Early Dynastic Egyptian object from Abusir, high nickel metal in which is consistent with ores and artifacts from Early Bronze Age Anatolia, in present-day Turkey.

"Lead isotopes showed us where the ore was most probably coming from," said archaeometallurgist Jiří Kmošek. "The results were quite unexpected," added Egyptologist Martin Odler. The study confirms that special metals had circulated around the Ancient Near East earlier than previously thought.


Egyptian-copper.jpg

Abstract:

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An assemblage of ancient Egyptian metalwork from the Early Dynastic and Old Kingdom periods, currently in the Egyptian Museum of Leipzig University (Germany), has been studied using a wide range of available archaeometallurgical methods. The 3rd millennium BC Egyptian copper metallurgy is known only superficially until now. The data are interpreted in the framework of the known and reconstructed distribution networks of ancient Egyptian society. The production technology of the objects has been examined. The lead isotope analyses have made it possible to discuss the origin of the ore used for the production of Old Kingdom metalwork for the first time. A rather surprising presence in the Early Dynastic assemblage of object similar in isotopic ratios to Anatolian Early Bronze Age metalwork is discussed.


More:

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The artefacts were found at the Egyptian sites of Abusir, Abydos and Giza. They were excavated in the royal tomb of King Khasekhemwy at Abydos (c. 2700 BCE) and non-royal tombs of officials from the Early Dynastic Period (Abusir; c. 3100–2900 BCE) and the Old Kingdom (Giza; c. 2350–2275 BCE).

Figure-1-300x184.jpg
 

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The greatest surprise was a large bowl from a Dynasty-1 tomb at Abusir (Fig. 2). It is peculiar by its contents of arsenic (1.4%) and nickel (4.8%), very unusual for that period in Egypt. The lead isotope ratios match Anatolian ores and are similar to contemporary Early Bronze Age Anatolian artefacts, in a distance more than 1,500 kilometres.
Figure-2-300x147.jpg
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6 minutes ago, Thanos5150 said:

The artefacts were found at the Egyptian sites of Abusir, Abydos and Giza. They were excavated in the royal tomb of King Khasekhemwy at Abydos (c. 2700 BCE) and non-royal tombs of officials from the Early Dynastic Period (Abusir; c. 3100–2900 BCE) and the Old Kingdom (Giza; c. 2350–2275 BCE).

Further reading: Khasekhemwy- Bridge to the Pyramid Age

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On 7/26/2022 at 8:16 AM, Thanos5150 said:

 

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This thread is about the abrupt change in stone working ability and all that entails from one pharaoh to the next that is not explained in the archeological record. Or by religion. What is baffling to me is that you'd think this would be a subject of interest to students of history, a real "mystery" as it were, and yet other than you and one other in response to you there has been no participation here and even then it has not actually been about the point of the OP. Par for the course. Yet in the meantime, since this thread was started, several pages of the same BS has continued in the Atlantis thread by the same participants saying the same things over and over again. 43 f-ing pages and counting and this is just one of these moronic Atlantis threads that have come and gone since I have been here. How do we explain this? 

Several months later....

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On 7/26/2022 at 8:03 PM, Thanos5150 said:

Egyptian-Southern Levantine Interaction in the 4th and 3rd Millennium B.C. - A View from Tell el-Farkha

And:

Egyptian trading post at Tel Erani in Israel older than previously thought

These finds push the dating to at least the Naqada II c.3300BC, perhaps as early as Naqada I. Article of the same:

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Recent studies of researchers from Kraków have shown that the inhabitants of Lower Egypt maintained relations with southern Levant, which used to be a topic of discussion. "We proved that they were very intensive" - notes the expedition leader. He explains that in the fourth millennium BC, the two regions cooperated closely. Commodities like copper and oil were imported to Egypt. Meat of animals and fish was shipped to Levant.


Sites with artifacts of Narmer in the southern Levant:
narmerinPalastine.gif

Sites where 1st Dynasty pottery has been found:
potteryinpalastine.gif

And:

Very interesting:

En Esur: Ancient Megalopolis Uncovered in Israel c. 3000-5000BC

More.

En Esur:
19386322-7543517-image-a-46_1570437568880.jpg

sxPbER6HsLgfaZhvzkjhXA-970-80.jpg

More images.
 

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Archeologists [sic] recently discovered an ancient lost city north of Tel Aviv. This large, 5,000-year-old city, bustling with around 6,000 people, was the "early Bronze Age New York," of the region and likely one of the first complex cities in what is now Israel, according to excavation directors at the Israel Antiquities Authority....

"Such a city could not develop without having behind it a guiding hand and an administrative mechanism," they said. "Its impressive planning, the tools brought to Israel from Egypt [and Egyptian pottery] found at the site, and its seal impressions are proof of this." Below some of the houses, the archaeologists also uncovered evidence of an even older city that dates back some 7,000 years to the Chalcolithic period.

 

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23 hours ago, Thanos5150 said:

Very interesting:

En Esur: Ancient Megalopolis Uncovered in Israel c. 3000-5000BC

More.

En Esur:
19386322-7543517-image-a-46_1570437568880.jpg

sxPbER6HsLgfaZhvzkjhXA-970-80.jpg

More images.
 

Quote

Archeologists [sic] recently discovered an ancient lost city north of Tel Aviv. This large, 5,000-year-old city, bustling with around 6,000 people, was the "early Bronze Age New York," of the region and likely one of the first complex cities in what is now Israel, according to excavation directors at the Israel Antiquities Authority....

"Such a city could not develop without having behind it a guiding hand and an administrative mechanism," they said. "Its impressive planning, the tools brought to Israel from Egypt [and Egyptian pottery] found at the site, and its seal impressions are proof of this." Below some of the houses, the archaeologists also uncovered evidence of an even older city that dates back some 7,000 years to the Chalcolithic period.

 

More: Temples and Temple-Builders at Early Bronze Age Megiddo (ca. 3300–3000 BCE) 

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  • 4 months later...
On 7/29/2022 at 9:47 AM, Thanos5150 said:

En Esur: Ancient Megalopolis Uncovered in Israel c. 3000-5000BC

More.

En Esur:
19386322-7543517-image-a-46_1570437568880.jpg

sxPbER6HsLgfaZhvzkjhXA-970-80.jpg

More images.

Archeologists [sic] recently discovered an ancient lost city north of Tel Aviv. This large, 5,000-year-old city, bustling with around 6,000 people, was the "early Bronze Age New York," of the region and likely one of the first complex cities in what is now Israel, according to excavation directors at the Israel Antiquities Authority....

"Such a city could not develop without having behind it a guiding hand and an administrative mechanism," they said. "Its impressive planning, the tools brought to Israel from Egypt [and Egyptian pottery] found at the site, and its seal impressions are proof of this." Below some of the houses, the archaeologists also uncovered evidence of an even older city that dates back some 7,000 years to the Chalcolithic period.

 

Israeli Archaeological Sites Like En Esur Fast Disappearing Under Construction Pressure

Edited by Thanos5150
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On 12/6/2022 at 11:53 AM, Thanos5150 said:

I hate seeing that. It makes me think of the wanton destruction that happened in North America with the Hopewell and Adena sites and that fool who wanted to pull the Egyptian pyramids down.

On top Cromwell's Puritan chuckleheads also destroying ancient English sites.

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