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20 Winter Weather Folklore Sayings


rashore
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
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The folklore of winter weather is fascinating. You’re sure to know some of these weather sayings, passed down by generations of people who lived close to the land and nature. Which ones do you know?

Winter is the harshest season. The natural world—clouds, birds, animals, and plants—all provided cues to predict what the winter will bring! Generations of hunters, farmers, and fishermen relied upon this weather lore to predict storms and the severity of the coming winter.

Did you know: The study of weather proverbs is known as paroemieology. Most are fanciful fun with no basis in scientific fact while others have been found to have a kernel of truth at their core.

https://www.almanac.com/winter-weather-folklore

 

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I guess I'm in for a hard winter because the first week of August here has been blazing hot.

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I asked a biologist working for the US Park service about some very large acorns I found. I was told that was due to wet summers.

I have leaves falling quite early this year. I know that is due to the apple-cedar rust.

I have squirrels with very bushy tails. That's because they are well fed by the seed falling from my numerous feeders.

I've been seeing lots of bears this summer. Hope it's a great acorn season to keep the bears out of the towns.

Will the hot summer bring a cold winter? I have no idea.

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5 hours ago, stereologist said:

I asked a biologist working for the US Park service about some very large acorns I found. I was told that was due to wet summers.

I have leaves falling quite early this year. I know that is due to the apple-cedar rust.

I have squirrels with very bushy tails. That's because they are well fed by the seed falling from my numerous feeders.

I've been seeing lots of bears this summer. Hope it's a great acorn season to keep the bears out of the towns.

Will the hot summer bring a cold winter? I have no idea.

The trees here are shutting down and changing because of the extreme heat.

 

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12 hours ago, Piney said:

The trees here are shutting down and changing because of the extreme heat.

 

Could be true, but I see the spots on the leaves from the cedar-apple rust. It happens every year. It's the rain drops that splashes the fungus spores from leaf to leaf. I also see the orange squishy blobs in the cedar trees each spring. The maples and oaks are not affected, just the crab apples and other apples trees by the house.

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20 minutes ago, stereologist said:

Could be true, but I see the spots on the leaves from the cedar-apple rust. It happens every year. It's the rain drops that splashes the fungus spores from leaf to leaf. I also see the orange squishy blobs in the cedar trees each spring. The maples and oaks are not affected, just the crab apples and other apples trees by the house.

Most of the ERC around here aren't near any apples and even though I cut a lot of ERC here I haven't encountered the rust in the past 2 seasons.

But your right. The orchard owners want the ERC taken out of their woodlands regardless. 

It's actually surprising it doesn't affect oaks, which are basal rosids and distantly relatives of apples.

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1 hour ago, Piney said:

Most of the ERC around here aren't near any apples and even though I cut a lot of ERC here I haven't encountered the rust in the past 2 seasons.

But your right. The orchard owners want the ERC taken out of their woodlands regardless. 

It's actually surprising it doesn't affect oaks, which are basal rosids and distantly relatives of apples.

It's like the red currants being removed to allow the white pines to grow into timber.

Back in the days leading to 2012 some people were claiming that the dropping of leaves in a wet year was actually proof that the world was tilting due to an incoming planet.

All of my ERC are well shaped by the deer that use them as back scratchers

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