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Escaped alpacas spark Loch Ness Monster sightings


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I just read an very interesting article about the famous Coelacanth fish. An supposed extinct fish that come back to life (1938). I wonder, maybe some kind of similar process of 'return' from prehistory took place in the Loch Ness? And created the Ness monster.

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7 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

I just read an very interesting article about the famous Coelacanth fish. An supposed extinct fish that come back to life (1938). I wonder, maybe some kind of similar process of 'return' from prehistory took place in the Loch Ness? And created the Ness monster.

Be careful here. The extinct coelacanth is extinct. The species found today are not the species that had been found in the fossil record.

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8 hours ago, ThereWeAreThen said:

Well atleast there's a clear photo.:innocent:

I think that's because the alpacas do not have antigravity drives that blur the photos

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3 hours ago, stereologist said:

The species found today are not the species that had been found in the fossil record.

Yes, I know it. But still, in the last 10 million years Coelacanth fish gained 'only' 62 new genes. It is basically 99.99% the same fish even today, as a fish found in the fossil record. In addition, these 62 new genes are classified as so-called 'parasite genes'. And it is still not possible to say with certainty whether these genes changed the morphology of Coelacanth at all.

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Posted (edited)

Escaped alpacas spark Loch Ness Monster sightings . . .

The title is confusing. I assumed it meant Nessie had come out of the water to collect her packed alpaca lunch :unsure2:

Edited by ouija ouija
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4 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

Yes, I know it. But still, in the last 10 million years Coelacanth fish gained 'only' 62 new genes. It is basically 99.99% the same fish even today, as a fish found in the fossil record. In addition, these 62 new genes are classified as so-called 'parasite genes'. And it is still not possible to say with certainty whether these genes changed the morphology of Coelacanth at all.

The morphology is recorded in the fossil record, the behavior is not. Where did this DNA come from? DNA is not going to be available from fossils over 60Mya.

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6 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

Yes, I know it. But still, in the last 10 million years Coelacanth fish gained 'only' 62 new genes. It is basically 99.99% the same fish even today, as a fish found in the fossil record. In addition, these 62 new genes are classified as so-called 'parasite genes'. And it is still not possible to say with certainty whether these genes changed the morphology of Coelacanth at all.

biggest difference I can see is that we have clear pics of the Coelacanth fish.

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18 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

I just read an very interesting article about the famous Coelacanth fish. An supposed extinct fish that come back to life (1938). I wonder, maybe some kind of similar process of 'return' from prehistory took place in the Loch Ness? And created the Ness monster.

The North Sea has giant squid, I think past photos have been a tentacle popping above the waves. I can see one straying up river in Scotland every now and again. The loch is very deep water.

We do have Lama and Alpaca here. Strange animals, look odd. I have a Lama farm near me and every time I pass it I laugh at those strange beasts. I can see someone mistaking them for Loch Ness Monsters if they had just their necks and heads above water.

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On 8/12/2022 at 3:29 PM, jethrofloyd said:

I just read an very interesting article about the famous Coelacanth fish. An supposed extinct fish that come back to life (1938). I wonder, maybe some kind of similar process of 'return' from prehistory took place in the Loch Ness? And created the Ness monster.

The coal didnt "come back" it simply wasnt know tribal fishermen had been catching them all along, so tell me what "prehistoric" creatures were in the lock hiding all this time?

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On 8/12/2022 at 3:10 PM, ThereWeAreThen said:

Well atleast there's a clear photo.:innocent:

Yet its still easy to see just what it is.

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48 minutes ago, the13bats said:

..what "prehistoric" creatures were in the lock hiding all this time?

I dunno, Bats. Maybe a some prehistoric turtle? They had a rather long neck. A long neck is what is most often attributed to the 'Loch Ness monster'.

This giant prehistoric turtle is... - Jurassic World Alive | Facebook

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18 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

I dunno, Bats. Maybe a some prehistoric turtle? They had a rather long neck. A long neck is what is most often attributed to the 'Loch Ness monster'.

This giant prehistoric turtle is... - Jurassic World Alive | Facebook

Its boring but i believe mamy sightings are the wells catfish dumped in the lock for sport fishing. No heads out of water.

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46 minutes ago, the13bats said:

 No heads out of water.

These are some of the most well known images of the 'Loch Ness monster'.

Loch Ness Monster - Wikipedia              Darren Naish on Twitter: "It was, he said, smooth and glossy, with powerful  muscles, and that the portion out of the water was about 1.5m long (which  is large). There's a white

 

                        Loch Ness Monster — CorbinMaxey.com

 

                                                 

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Well ones a fake the other is a whale dick?

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48 minutes ago, the13bats said:

... the other is a whale dick?

No, the Loch Ness Monster isn’t just a whale penis, professor says

A UK professor who hilariously proposed that Scotland’s iconic Loch Ness monster is actually a “whale’s penis” has since walked back his salacious claim.

“There are no whales whatsoever in Loch Ness,” Michael Sweet, a molecular ecologist at the University of Derby, told Live Science regarding his cryptozoological bombshell.

https://nypost.com/2022/04/18/no-loch-ness-monster-isnt-a-whale-penis-professor-says/

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, the13bats said:

Well ones a fake

This is a generally accepted truth. But, the question is, is it a really accurate?

''Not everyone accepts the Spurling story. American journalist Richard Smith, for example, notes that toy experts question whether the toy submarines of the 1930s could have performed as described, and he wonders why Boyd waited until after Spurling's death to reveal his confession. But in the aftermath of Boyd's 1994 bombshell, most people now believe the surgeon's photo was yet another Loch Ness hoax''.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/lochness/legend3.html

And, here is an pretty long PDF text with the analysis and a conclusion, that famous photo is not a hoax.

Loch Ness Surgeon's Photo hoax rebuttal:  https://www.academia.edu/11962898/Loch_Ness_Surgeons_Photo_Hoax_Rebuttal

Edited by jethrofloyd
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46 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

This is a generally accepted truth. But, the question is, is it a really accurate?

''Not everyone accepts the Spurling story. American journalist Richard Smith, for example, notes that toy experts question whether the toy submarines of the 1930s could have performed as described, and he wonders why Boyd waited until after Spurling's death to reveal his confession. But in the aftermath of Boyd's 1994 bombshell, most people now believe the surgeon's photo was yet another Loch Ness hoax''.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/lochness/legend3.html

And, here is an pretty long PDF text with the analysis and a conclusion, that famous photo is not a hoax.

Loch Ness Surgeon's Photo hoax rebuttal:  https://www.academia.edu/11962898/Loch_Ness_Surgeons_Photo_Hoax_Rebuttal

 

Is the back story true? I dont know or care because i can tell by the wave size subject size compared to said waves its not a large subject,

As far as claims how a clock work toy of that era would perform it doesnt matter its not "performing" its a still pic.

image-asset.jpeg

In addition if it was a creature then it would fall into the trap of breeding population numbers and never seen since.

This is a fake a hoax.

If i were to reproduce it i wouldnt use a 3d creature just a cut out, and use the out of focus grainy pic to my advantage and i could do it with a 30s clock work toy.

Not unlike the cardboard fin the kids in Jaws used.

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5 hours ago, jethrofloyd said:

No, the Loch Ness Monster isn’t just a whale penis, professor says

A UK professor who hilariously proposed that Scotland’s iconic Loch Ness monster is actually a “whale’s penis” has since walked back his salacious claim.

“There are no whales whatsoever in Loch Ness,” Michael Sweet, a molecular ecologist at the University of Derby, told Live Science regarding his cryptozoological bombshell.

https://nypost.com/2022/04/18/no-loch-ness-monster-isnt-a-whale-penis-professor-says/

Can a whale take the wrong direction and accidently find its way in there though?

No, thats not bum hole humour, I mean entering the loch.

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10 minutes ago, Cookie Monster said:

Can a whale take the wrong direction and accidently find its way in there though?

No, thats not bum hole humour, I mean entering the loch.

Only if it can negotiate around 27 Locks and manned swing bridges... Impossible. 

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15 minutes ago, Cookie Monster said:

Can a whale take the wrong direction and accidently find its way in there though?

I belive there is no chans for the eel to wander into the Loch Ness, let alone a whale. As I know the Loch Ness and Inverness(on the North Sea shore) are connected with the Caledonian Canal which looks like this:

Aerial view of the Caledonian Canal and canal locks at Fort Augustus,  Inverness-shire, Scotland Stock Photo - Alamy

A lot of these ''barriers'' (I don't know what they are called professionally) which are used to regulate a water level during the passage of the boats,

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Earlier reports had the monster walking on land.

The only reason that the Loch monster is even famous is due to the BBC. Before that they promoted the Lake Champlain monster in the US. When they found out they could promote something in the UK they stopped promoting the US monster in favor of the UK monster, which was relatively unknown before the promotion.

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The earliest report of Loch Ness monster appears in an ancient text from the sixth century AD. This describes an encounter by the Irish monk Saint Columba who was staying in the near the mouth of the River Ness. On seeing the monster, Columba made the sign of the cross and banished the creature to Loch Ness.

                                               Bildagentur | mauritius images | St Columba Rebukes The Loch Ness Monster  After It Attacked A Man.

 

                                                   A stone found near the Loch Ness lake.

 

                                               Symbol stone

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