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Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Breivik sues state again over isolation


Still Waters

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The 43-year-old Norwegian far-right extremist has been in solitary confinement in prison since his 2012 conviction, according to his lawyer Oystein Storrvik. Earlier this year he was moved from one prison to another, but Mr Storrvik said there's been no progress in terms of human contact.

https://news.sky.com/story/mass-murderer-anders-breivik-suing-norway-government-again-in-bid-to-end-his-prison-isolation-12681931

https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/norwegian-mass-murderer-sues-norwegian-state-88885977

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I hope they keep him in prison.

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Too bad, is all I can say to this.  Did the crime now do the time.   I hope they do not bend to him.

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  • 1 year later...

And again:

Quote

Anders Behring Breivik is claiming his prison life in solitary confinement is illegal.

Convicted mass murderer Anders Breivik appeared in court on Monday in a second attempt to sue the Norwegian state for allegedly breaching his human rights.

https://www.euronews.com/2024/01/08/mass-killer-tries-to-sue-norway-for-alleged-human-rights-breach

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On 8/26/2022 at 7:57 PM, Still Waters said:

The 43-year-old Norwegian far-right extremist has been in solitary confinement in prison since his 2012 conviction, according to his lawyer Oystein Storrvik. Earlier this year he was moved from one prison to another, but Mr Storrvik said there's been no progress in terms of human contact.

https://news.sky.com/story/mass-murderer-anders-breivik-suing-norway-government-again-in-bid-to-end-his-prison-isolation-12681931

https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/norwegian-mass-murderer-sues-norwegian-state-88885977

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Lets not forgot Norway doesn`t do whole life sentences.

At some point he will be released unless they change their laws. Is it 20 years max there? He would be out in 2032 minus whatever time was served during pre-trial detention.

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4 hours ago, Electric Scooter said:

Lets not forgot Norway doesn`t do whole life sentences.

At some point he will be released unless they change their laws. Is it 20 years max there? He would be out in 2032 minus whatever time was served during pre-trial detention.

So it would be great if he do an Eipstein in 2032 whatever time was served during pre-trial detention.

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26 minutes ago, Jon the frog said:

So it would be great if he do an Eipstein in 2032 whatever time was served during pre-trial detention.

Ah yes, the staged bedsheet hanging, ignoring how all the cable has been torn up in the cell, and how the cameras were turned off.

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Extreme right-wing terrorist, not mass murderer. Call him what he is.

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13 hours ago, Setton said:

Extreme right-wing terrorist, not mass murderer. Call him what he is.

So, a successful right-wing terrorist?

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2 minutes ago, pellinore said:

So, a successful right-wing terrorist?

My point is that if he were Muslim, he'd never be described just as a mass murderer, as if his ideology had nothing to do with his crimes.

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7 minutes ago, Setton said:

My point is that if he were Muslim, he'd never be described just as a mass murderer, as if his ideology had nothing to do with his crimes.

A very good point but isn't this also true: Muslim terrorism is frequent and global- Sam Harris wrote about it in The End of Faith. Right-wing terrorism in the form of mass murder is rare- there were the NZ synagogue shootings, the Unibomber, and Brevik. And being so extremely right-wing as to actually murder strangers is considered a bit nut-job, not mainstream, while killing apostates and non-believers is central to Islam.

I may be wrong, though. But it may explain why we think of Brevik as an aberration, while the Manchester Bomber conformed to stereotype.

 

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Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, pellinore said:

A very good point but isn't this also true: Muslim terrorism is frequent and global- Sam Harris wrote about it in The End of Faith. Right-wing terrorism in the form of mass murder is rare- there were the NZ synagogue shootings, the Unibomber, and Brevik. And being so extremely right-wing as to actually murder strangers is considered a bit nut-job, not mainstream, while killing apostates and non-believers is central to Islam.

I may be wrong, though. But it may explain why we think of Brevik as an aberration, while the Manchester Bomber conformed to stereotype.

There are a number of issues with this post.

1. The frequency of terrorist attacks should not dictate definitions. Brevik is a convicted terrorist and should be treated exactly the same as any other convicted terrorist.

2. Just because extreme right wing terrorists are less successful in their attacks, that should not change the way we treat it. The main reason mass murder is less common is because they don't have coordinated logistics in the way large Islamist groups do. Yet. There's also a difference in ideology - right wing terrorists are less willing to die for their cause, which means they're less likely to employ IEDs, lowering casualties.

3. Extreme right wing terrorism is also frequent and global. It is the fastest growing terrorist threat in the UK, making up 1/3 of all foiled attacks. Read up on the trajectory across Europe, Australia and North America too.

4. You fundamentally misunderstand the motivations behind Islamist terrorism ('Muslim terrorism' doesn't make sense as a term). They don't kill us because we're unbelievers. That's what makes it permissable to kill us. The motivation for killing us is to get us out of what they see as their territory so they can establish an Islamist state there. There's a reason ISIS tried to open communication with the government after taking British hostages, and it wasn't because they were desperate for money, controlling Iraqi oil fields. They wanted to be treated as a state and negotiated with.

Edited by Setton
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  • 1 month later...

Neo-Nazi Anders Breivik, who killed 77 people in Norway in 2011, has lost his case against the state in a bid to end his years of isolation in prison.

Breivik had sued the Norwegian authorities, claiming his conditions were "inhumane" and he was suicidal.

But a court ruled on Thursday that Breivik's sentencing terms were "not a violation of human rights".

Breivik's lawyer said his client was disappointed with the outcome and would appeal against the latest judgment.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-68310127

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1 hour ago, Still Waters said:

Neo-Nazi Anders Breivik, who killed 77 people in Norway in 2011, has lost his case against the state in a bid to end his years of isolation in prison.

Breivik had sued the Norwegian authorities, claiming his conditions were "inhumane" and he was suicidal.

But a court ruled on Thursday that Breivik's sentencing terms were "not a violation of human rights".

Breivik's lawyer said his client was disappointed with the outcome and would appeal against the latest judgment.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-68310127

He should look on the bright side, there are no booty bandits in solitary.

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On 1/9/2024 at 6:11 PM, Setton said:

Extreme right-wing terrorist, not mass murderer. Call him what he is.

Don’t think semantics apply here, thou your point is well taken

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He murdered 77 people, mostly teenagers, and now he's concerned about human rights. Yeah. What he wants. How about his Nazi salute in court?

It looks like he has it pretty good in prison. All the modern conveniences. 

I remember discussing the NZ mass shooting here in the forum. It was two mosques, not a synagogue, that he attacked. That shooter idolized Breivek. He had a big manifesto praising him. He was sentenced to life in prison. A sentence never given before in New Zealand.

I'm glad Breivek's case was denied. I hope neither one of them ever gets out of prison. 

Edited by susieice
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56 minutes ago, susieice said:

He murdered 77 people, mostly teenagers, and now he's concerned about human rights. Yeah. What he wants. How about his Nazi salute in court?

It looks like he has it pretty good in prison. All the modern conveniences. 

I remember discussing the NZ mass shooting here in the forum. It was two mosques, not a synagogue, that he attacked. That shooter idolized Breivek. He had a big manifesto praising him. He was sentenced to life in prison. A sentence never given before in New Zealand.

I'm glad Breivek's case was denied. I hope neither one of them ever gets out of prison. 

Norway has some strange rules about prison sentences - 20 years max.

If it was in the USA he would have 3500 years.

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Imagine murderously breaking the law and then legally challenging the punishment for murder

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On 2/18/2024 at 1:25 AM, Electric Scooter said:

Norway has some strange rules about prison sentences - 20 years max.

If it was in the USA he would have 3500 years.

Depending on the state, he would have gotten the death penalty.

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On 2/19/2024 at 4:36 PM, susieice said:

Depending on the state, he would have gotten the death penalty.

Yet despite the death penalty, the US has many times the rate of violent crime compared to Norway:

STAT
Norway
United States
HISTORY
Age of criminal responsibility 15
Ranked 8th. 3 times more than United States
6
Ranked 58th.
 
Crime levels 29.93
Ranked 69th.
55.84
Ranked 30th. 87% more than Norway
 
Drugs > Annual cannabis use 4.6%
Ranked 5th.
13.7%
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Norway
 
Drugs > Opiates use 0.4%
Ranked 1st.
0.57%
Ranked 3rd. 42% more than Norway
 
Murder rate 0.6 5
Police officers 233.9
Ranked 7th.
243.6
Ranked 27th. 4% more than Norway
 
Rape rate 19.2
Ranked 15th.
27.3
Ranked 9th. 42% more than Norway

Total crimes 330,071
Ranked 29th.
11.88 million
Ranked 1st. 36 times more than Norway

Norway vs United States Crime Stats Compared (nationmaster.com)

Edited by pellinore
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26 minutes ago, pellinore said:

Yet despite the death penalty, the US has many times the rate of violent crime compared to Norway:

STAT
Norway
United States
HISTORY
Age of criminal responsibility 15
Ranked 8th. 3 times more than United States
6
Ranked 58th.
 
Crime levels 29.93
Ranked 69th.
55.84
Ranked 30th. 87% more than Norway
 
Drugs > Annual cannabis use 4.6%
Ranked 5th.
13.7%
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Norway
 
Drugs > Opiates use 0.4%
Ranked 1st.
0.57%
Ranked 3rd. 42% more than Norway
 
Murder rate 0.6 5  
Police officers 233.9
Ranked 7th.
243.6
Ranked 27th. 4% more than Norway
 
Rape rate 19.2
Ranked 15th.
27.3
Ranked 9th. 42% more than Norway
 
Total crimes 330,071
Ranked 29th.
11.88 million
Ranked 1st. 36 times more than Norway

Norway vs United States Crime Stats Compared (nationmaster.com)

Few states actually carry them out. With appeals, it can take over 20 yrs in many states. My state, Pennsylvania, has the death penalty but has only actually used it 3 times in spite of all the murderers who were sentenced to it. It does depend on the state.

We also have many times the population of Norway.

Edited by susieice
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10 minutes ago, susieice said:

Few states actually carry them out. With appeals, it can take over 20 yrs in many states. My state, Pennsylvania, has the death penalty but has only actually used it 3 times in spite of all the murderers who were sentenced to it. It does depend on the state.

We also have many times the population of Norway.

A criminals psychology is in most cases all over the place. But there are always deaths due to accidents, foolishness, and immaturity too. But with most have a psychology all over the place then I think the test is as follows:

Life Sentence + Psychological Mess = No need to keep them locked up on death row for 20 years, just go ahead and execute.

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I know California carried out a death sentence on one of the original founders of the Bloods gang, 22 years after his sentence. I know there's appeals and I don't remember how long it took, but that seemed to me to be a little cruel. That man certainly didn't expect the sentence to be carried out after all those years. 

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31 minutes ago, susieice said:

We also have many times the population of Norway.

Pretty certain that rate means the overall numbers are immaterial. For example, a lung cancer mortality rate of 20% means 1 in 5, regardless of the population numbers. Brevik is an aberration. Scandinavian countries score well for low crime, happiness and well-being. Their food is also good.

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2 hours ago, pellinore said:

Yet despite the death penalty, the US has many times the rate of violent crime compared to Norway:

There is room to improve the process involved in death sentences but the argument that it doesn't tend to reduce murders is silly.  It isn't intended to do that alone.  It is the ultimate punishment for the ultimate crime one human can commit against another - murder.  It certainly stops the killer from ever repeating his/her actions.  

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