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7,000-year-old structure near Prague is older than Stonehenge, Egyptian pyramids


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Archaeologists digging near Prague have discovered the remains of a Stone Age structure that's older than Stonehenge and even the Egyptian pyramids: an enigmatic complex known as a roundel. Nearly 7,000 years ago during the late Neolithic, or New Stone Age, a local farming community may have gathered in this circular building, although its true purpose is unknown.  

The excavated roundel is large — about 180 feet (55 meters) in diameter, or about as long as the Leaning Tower of Pisa is tall, Radio Prague International reported. And while "it is too early to say anything about the people building this roundel," it's clear that they were part of the Stroked Pottery culture, which flourished between 4900 B.C. and 4400 B.C., Jaroslav Řídký, a spokesperson for the Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IAP) and an expert on the Czech Republic's roundels, told Live Science in an email.

https://www.livescience.com/neolithic-roundel-structure-prague

https://english.radio.cz/archaeologists-prague-uncover-ancient-neolithic-structure-8760696

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Newgrange in Ireland is older than either the Egyptian pyramids or Stonehenge, and, as gfar as I know, is the oldest astronomically aligned man-made structure in Europe.

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On 9/21/2022 at 9:49 PM, Ozymandias said:

Newgrange in Ireland is older than either the Egyptian pyramids or Stonehenge, and, as gfar as I know, is the oldest astronomically aligned man-made structure in Europe.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almendres_Cromlech

The construction of these structures dates back to the 6th millennium BC. They were rediscovered in 1966 by Henrique Leonor Pina, who was carrying out field work relating to the country's geological charts.[1][3][4][5]

The excavation of the site unearthed a series of both megalithic and neolithic construction phases; Almendres I 6000 BC (Early Neolithic), Almendres II 5000 BC (Middle Neolithic), and Almendres III 4000 BC (Late Neolithic). The relative chronology of the cromlech and menhirs is extremely complex and covers a period from the Neolithic to Chalcolithic. It is believed that the monument either had a religious/ceremonial purpose or functioned as a primitive astronomical observatory.[1][5]

Edited by Abramelin
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