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NASA will smash its DART spacecraft into an asteroid on Monday. Here's how to watch.


Still Waters
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40 minutes ago, SHaYap said:

:rolleyes:

~

"mission accomplished"

~

You’ve made it extremely obvious of your ignorance to the significance of the mission.

<10 minutes might help with the context:

 

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22 minutes ago, Timothy said:

You’ve made it extremely obvious of your ignorance to the significance of the mission.

Coming from you, that's one of the highest compliment I've ever had here on UM, thanks 

You can go back to playing with your rockit ships and Star Trek action figures now

~

22 minutes ago, Timothy said:

<10 minutes might help with the context:

:lol:

Quote

[00.00:12]

I see your 10minutes and raise you 12seconds

~

 

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9 minutes ago, SHaYap said:

Coming from you, that's one of the highest compliment I've ever had here on UM, thanks 

You can go back to playing with your rockit ships and Star Trek action figures now

~

:lol:

I see your 10minutes and raise you 12seconds

~

 

It’s fine if you don’t get the significance. All G.

I’ll look forward to the updates.

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27 minutes ago, Timothy said:

All G

The acceleration of gravity on the surface of the earth at sea level is

9.8 m/s2

~

 

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58 minutes ago, SHaYap said:

The acceleration of gravity on the surface of the earth at sea level is

9.8 m/s2

~

 

You’re fun.

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2 hours ago, SHaYap said:

The acceleration of gravity on the surface of the earth at sea level is

9.8 m/s2

~

 

What does that have anything to do with this topic? NOTHING.

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@pallidin I am really looking forward to seeing the data on the deflection of the body and change of orbit due to the impact.

This is just the start. Smashing a relatively small and highly destructible satellite into a celestial body at high velocity.

The data will be invaluable.

The fact that they hit it at that distance and speed is amazing!

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This was an amazing feet and I'm glad they did it.   Congratulations to them.  

To successfully aim and hit an object from that distance with a refrigerator sized object will provide invaluable information for the future.   

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

First images of asteroid strike from Webb, Hubble telescopes

The James Webb and Hubble telescopes on Thursday revealed their initial images of a spacecraft deliberately crashing into an asteroid, marking the first time the two most powerful space telescopes have observed the same celestial object.

https://phys.org/news/2022-09-images-asteroid-webb-hubble-telescopes.html

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On 9/27/2022 at 8:16 PM, Tatetopa said:

F=ma?   The explosion vaporizes a  portion of the  surface. Tons and tons of vaporized particles are accelerated at tremendous speed away from the surface.  Like a rocket motor I think the reaction mass pushes the asteroid in the opposite direction.

How about it @zep73 care to weigh in?

Sorry, been busy.

A nuclear explosion is not chemical energy, so it doesn't require oxygen, making it quite effective in space. But no one in their right mind would launch a rocket into space with a nuke. Rocket launches are terribly unreliable. (Unless maybe if there were no other choices.)

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41 minutes ago, zep73 said:

Sorry, been busy.

A nuclear explosion is not chemical energy, so it doesn't require oxygen, making it quite effective in space. But no one in their right mind would launch a rocket into space with a nuke. Rocket launches are terribly unreliable. (Unless maybe if there were no other choices.)

I thought it was just kinetic energy, a few  hundred pounds of satellite moving at high speed contacting the surface of the asteroid like a meteorite would,

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30 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

I thought it was just kinetic energy, a few  hundred pounds of satellite moving at high speed contacting the surface of the asteroid like a meteorite would,

The original question (which you answered, and asked me to weigh in):

 

On 9/27/2022 at 7:10 PM, lightly said:

Would a nuke be as powerful in no atmosphere?   .  . ?

 

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36 minutes ago, zep73 said:

The original question (which you answered, and asked me to weigh in):

Right you are. Its good to have you around.  Thanks.

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, zep73 said:

Sorry, been busy.

A nuclear explosion is not chemical energy, so it doesn't require oxygen, making it quite effective in space. But no one in their right mind would launch a rocket into space with a nuke. Rocket launches are terribly unreliable. (Unless maybe if there were no other choices.)

Forgive my lack of knowledge please…but, doesn’t a shock wave need something to wave?  Like atmosphere?     I was reading that a nuclear explosion in space would produce lots of heat and light (Radiation) but no violent physical force???  because there is almost nothing to push against??        Thanks Tatetopa for answering, and concurring zep.. as to what would happen if a nuke were detonated at the asteroid’s surface.

Edited by lightly
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

A new image shows that an asteroid which was deliberately struck by Nasa's Dart probe has left a trail of debris stretching thousands of kilometres.

A telescope in Chile captured the remarkable picture of a comet-like plume spreading behind the giant rock.

The probe was crashed last week to test whether asteroids that might threaten Earth can be nudged out of the way.

Scientists are working to establish whether the test was a success, and the asteroid's trajectory altered.

The extraordinary image was taken two days after the collision by astronomers in Chile, who were able to capture the vast trail using the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope (Soar).

It stretches for more than 10,000km (6,200 miles), and is expected to get even longer until it disperses completely, and looks like other space dust floating around.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-63140097

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On 10/2/2022 at 4:07 PM, lightly said:

Forgive my lack of knowledge please…but, doesn’t a shock wave need something to wave?  Like atmosphere?     I was reading that a nuclear explosion in space would produce lots of heat and light (Radiation) but no violent physical force???  because there is almost nothing to push against??        Thanks Tatetopa for answering, and concurring zep.. as to what would happen if a nuke were detonated at the asteroid’s surface.

That 'something' would be an asteroid.

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2 hours ago, Golden Duck said:

Not the Dart!  Why a Dart?

  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

Bigger impact than a durrie?

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Ok well here’s my 2 cents worth on this. If we absolutely had something heading our direction then sure blast it. But just playing target practice on objects that have been traveling the same sequence and direction for billions of years is foolish. Space is functioning like a clock they just busted a gear. Now something is going to bump something else and in due time they just caused a problem we didn’t have.
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On 10/22/2022 at 1:48 PM, Freez1 said:

When you screw with things you shouldn’t in the solar system you change the path and trajectory of everything.

https://futurism.com/the-byte/nasa-asteroid-dart-twin-tails?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=news_tab

You don't actually think this never occurred to NASA and you're the only one clever enough to realise that a deflection could have other consequences??? 

I'd say we're good. 

We had to know if we can do this. It was necessary.  Now we know we can. 

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ASTEROID NASA SMASHED A SPACECRAFT INTO GREW TWO "UNEXPECTED" TAILS

ASTRONOMERS ARE "BOTH SURPRISED AND PUZZLED."

omg I was just joking!:wacko:

On 9/23/2022 at 6:36 PM, joc said:

CNN Headline ~ Tuesday September 27

Yesterday NASA applauded the 1,210-pound (550 kilograms) DART craft as a huge success after slamming into the Asteroid Dimorphos dislodging it's orbit around its larger partner — the 1,280-feet-wide (390 m) asteroid Didymos. 

Unfortunately it appears  that both asteroids have changed direction and are now on a direct path to Earth.  NASA is perplexed as to why the speed with which both asteroids were travelling has now increased significantly.  SpaceX is preparing to launch more DART craft into orbit to intercept the asteroids.  It is a race against time as both asteroids are now traveling at roughly 263,875 mph (424,666 km/h) and the velocity appears to be increasing.  

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1 hour ago, psyche101 said:

You don't actually think this never occurred to NASA and you're the only one clever enough to realise that a deflection could have other consequences??? 

I'd say we're good. 

We had to know if we can do this. It was necessary.  Now we know we can. 

No but as this is a open forum where people voice their opinions on subjects of interest I figured I would cast my own. But like always I have a way of stumbling across some smart ass. Thanks for sticking out and reminding us all you are always lurking in the shadows.

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16 minutes ago, Freez1 said:

No but as this is a open forum where people voice their opinions on subjects of interest I figured I would cast my own. But like always I have a way of stumbling across some smart ass. Thanks for sticking out and reminding us all you are always lurking in the shadows.

Smart ass hey.

NASA has sent five probes outside the solar system. The new horizons project sent a craft hurtling at 36,400 mph over nine years using gravity assist to manoeuvre a craft the size of a grand piano 1.4 million miles from the surface offering unprecedented clarity of a distant solar object. 

And next to that we have your opinion. 

Thanks for reminding us deliberate ignorance is in your shadow in abundance. 

Edited by psyche101
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