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Loch Ness Monster may live in a 'parallel universe'


Eldorado
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So branches, otters and wind all exist in parallel universes?  :o 

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This is not a "new theory". Ted Holliday proposed an interdimensional/paranormal Nessie in the 1970's.

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23 minutes ago, Piney said:

Like the interdimensional Bigfoot that only stops in this one to snack because there are no deer, dogs or sheep in his. :yes:

Nessie is quite fond of lamb!

C2ONu49W8AAo7i-.thumb.jpg.bf2aa3e1912a4151f49baf3e316ad146.jpg

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:hmm:  

Quote

He said: "Scientists have suggested there could be other universes. And somehow our world interacts with these other worlds through portals.

I believe though we have been cut off from the universe, so this is possible, but not right now.

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1 hour ago, Eldorado said:

The Loch Ness Monster maybe be living in a Stranger Things-style parallel universe,

It's called 'fantasy', or 'imagination'.

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I'm very open to this idea. When dealing with modern mysteries, new thinking is allowed. I've seen/heard of plenty enough to think our straightforward understanding of reality is not all there is.

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16 minutes ago, papageorge1 said:

I'm very open to this idea. When dealing with modern mysteries, new thinking is allowed. I've seen/heard of plenty enough to think our straightforward understanding of reality is not all there is.

I agree.

But your 'new thinking' is as old as time.

 

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Parallel universes are BS. They were only thought up to solve particle duality, but fails to solve all the other quantum oddities. It's not even half a solution, it's a total blunder.

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5 hours ago, Dreamer screamer said:

I believe

Never a relevant start to any sentence.

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2 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

I'm very open to this idea. When dealing with modern mysteries, new thinking is allowed. I've seen/heard of plenty enough to think our straightforward understanding of reality is not all there is.

New thinking is always allowed...and always encouraged.  There are things we do not know...like the relationship between that which we call 'outer space' and the rest of the universe.  There may be parallel universes...overlapping with ours like an Algebraic Venn Diagram.  Notwithstanding, the belief in all that is just that...belief.  And no belief has any relevance whatsoever to the truth we know about the known universe.

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13 hours ago, joc said:

New thinking is always allowed...and always encouraged.  There are things we do not know...like the relationship between that which we call 'outer space' and the rest of the universe.  There may be parallel universes...overlapping with ours like an Algebraic Venn Diagram.  Notwithstanding, the belief in all that is just that...belief.  And no belief has any relevance whatsoever to the truth we know about the known universe.

I wouldn't call them 'beliefs' but 'theories'. And when considering modern mysteries novel theories should be considered. That was my point.

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But parallel universe theory is not novel.  

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The idea of infinite worlds was first suggested by the pre-Socratic Greek philosopher Anaximander in the sixth century BCE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiverse#History_of_the_concept

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2 hours ago, papageorge1 said:

I wouldn't call them 'beliefs' but 'theories'. And when considering modern mysteries novel theories should be considered. That was my point.

Often 'theories' are accompanied by scientific papers...

I'd like to read one about this topic.

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6 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

I'd like to read one about this topic.

I believe this is the closest you can get:

https://www.nature.com/articles/134765a0

AT a general meeting of the Linnean Society of London, held on November 8, the Loch Ness ‘monster’ was for the first time discussed by a scientific society. Sir Edward Mountain gave an account of his en deavours to settle the creature's identity by employing twenty watchers distributed around the Loch under the supervision of Capt. Fraser. These watchers were suppJied with cameras on loan from the Kodak Co. Ltd., and also with field glasses. During the first two weeks of last July, the creature was seen by the watchers twenty-one times. In September a film was taken by Capt. Fraser with a telephoto lens at a distance of about a mile from the creature; it was stated that the portion of the creature visible in the film had been estimated by the Kodak Co. to be about eight feet in length. The film was run through the projector several times and a discussion followed. The first impression of most members of the audience was probably that the movements of the creature shown on the film suggested those of a seal, but some of the speakers pointed out difficulties in the way. Commander R. T. Gould did not believe that the creature was a seal; he felt sure that the watchers would have readily recognised it as such. Further, he considered that it could not be a killer whale. Sir Sidney Harmer thought that until further evidence had been produced the verdict should be ‘not proven’. He thought that the creature was not a cetacean, but would probably prove to be a seal. Mr. M. A. C. Hinton and Mr. F. C. Fraser felt certain that the creature was a seal, with which opinion Dr. Stanley Kemp disagreed; nor did he believe it to be a cetacean. Sir Arthur Smith Woodward, referring to the popular belief, said that it was hopeless to com pare the creature with a Mesozoic reptile as no traces of these reptiles had been found in Tertiary rocks in any part of the world. Capt. J. G. Dollman was firmly convinced that the creature was an otter. The president (Dr. W. T. Caiman) and Mr. A. J. Wilmott expressed doubts as to the size of the creature as estimated by the Kodak Company. Enlargements of some of the ‘still’ photographs taken by the watchers were also exhibited at the meeting.

 
 

 

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On 9/24/2022 at 3:41 PM, Carnoferox said:

Nessie is quite fond of lamb!

C2ONu49W8AAo7i-.thumb.jpg.bf2aa3e1912a4151f49baf3e316ad146.jpg

Thats a great print i like it enough to hang on the wall yet its very inaccurate a pleso couldnt crawl on land nor could it hold its head neck up like that out of water especially with weight.

 

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On 9/25/2022 at 10:33 AM, papageorge1 said:

I wouldn't call them 'beliefs' but 'theories'. And when considering modern mysteries novel theories should be considered. That was my point.

They are only "theories" in the sense of a wild guess which never considers reality based evidence.

Theories in science explain evidence, and make successful predictions or they are discarded.

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