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Did a Deadly Plague Destroy Neolithic Europe?


Abramelin
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What caused the Neolithic Decline in Europe? Was it the first great plague in history? And if so, did it cause a Neolithic apocalypse?

In the 4th Millennium BC, Neolithic Europe experienced a sustained decline. By about 3000 BC Western Steppe Herders like the Yamnaya and related groups migrated west into Europe, changing the genetics and culture forever, and bringing about the Bronze Age.

The male lineages of Neolithic Europe came to an end as the steppe herders had offspring with the Neolithic farmer women. Did this only happen because the settled farmers had already been brought to their knees by waves of plague?

In this video we look at the first recorded samples of the plague - Yersinia Pestis - the same bacterium that caused the Black Death and the Plague of Justinian and Bronze Age plagues.

Did the disease first become dangerous in the vast proto-cities of the Cucuteni-Trypillia culture in Eastern Europe?

 

 

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Most probably a dedly plague was a fatal to the Neolithic Europe.

https://www.earth.com/news/oldest-plague-neolithic-europeans/

''The new strain of the plague is not only the oldest that has ever been discovered, but is also the closest to the genetic origin of Y. pestis. The strain likely diverged from other strains around 5,700 years ago, which was a time when mega-settlements of 10,000-20,000 inhabitants were becoming common in Europe. This made job specialization, new technology, and trade possible, but these large groups may have also provided a breeding ground for plague.

“These mega-settlements were the largest settlements in Europe at that time, ten times bigger than anything else. They had people, animals, and stored food close together, and, likely, very poor sanitation. That’s the textbook example of what you need to evolve new pathogens,”

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9 minutes ago, jethrofloyd said:

Most probably a dedly plague was a fatal to the Neolithic Europe.

https://www.earth.com/news/oldest-plague-neolithic-europeans/

''The new strain of the plague is not only the oldest that has ever been discovered, but is also the closest to the genetic origin of Y. pestis. The strain likely diverged from other strains around 5,700 years ago, which was a time when mega-settlements of 10,000-20,000 inhabitants were becoming common in Europe. This made job specialization, new technology, and trade possible, but these large groups may have also provided a breeding ground for plague.

“These mega-settlements were the largest settlements in Europe at that time, ten times bigger than anything else. They had people, animals, and stored food close together, and, likely, very poor sanitation. That’s the textbook example of what you need to evolve new pathogens,”

That article is based on the paper in the link in the second post. Just like the video in the OP.

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Interesting that the male linages ended and the females had a greater survival rate to a plague situation. Generally it was a plague of swords and arrows that was noticeably gender selective.:lol:

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